Geography BA (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: L700
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : D*DD
geography-1

Module details

Programme Year One

Students will take the following compulsory modules and choose three optional modules as detailed below.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Human Geography Through Merseyside (ENVS162)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module is designed with the following aims in mind:

    Introduce students to key areas of human geography inquiry practised at the University of Liverpool through engagement in practical exercises.

    Ground learning in a particular geographic context through focus on human geographic processes in Merseyside and Liverpool.

    Provide students with practical experience in a variety of methods for collecting and analysing geographic data.

    Allow students to practise speaking and writing about geographic concepts and linking these concepts to real-world examples.

    Provide experience working independently and in groups.

    Prepare students for studying Human Geography in subsequent years.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of key areas of Human Geography inquiry, and relate important geographic concepts to examples in Liverpool and Merseyside.

    (LO2) Demonstrate basic skills in the collection and interpretation of geographical data, both qualitative and quantitative.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Teamwork

  • Living With Environmental Change (ENVS119)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The over-arching aim of thismodule is to introduce students to the so-called ‘Grand Challenges’ facing society and what is being done to address them. Living with Environmental Change is a key interdisciplinary research theme currently being addressed worldwide; from tackling climate change and carbon emissions to promoting sustainable resource use and energy efficiency. This module illustrates that an interdisciplinary approach is crucial to identifying the underlying problems faced by humanity and to finding holistic and sustainable solutions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Obtain an understanding of the Grand Challenges facing society;

    (LO2) Develop an appreciation of the significance of interdisciplinary working in addressing the Grand Challenges;

    (LO3) Understand that Geography plays a key role in the Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) research agenda;

    (LO4) Become familiar with the linkages between research, policy and sustainability.

    (S1) Abstraction and synthesis of information

    (S2) Assessing the merits of contrasting theories and explanations

    (S3) Taking responsibility for learning and reflection upon that learning

    (S4) Synthesising, contextualising and critically evaluating information of different styles and from different sources

  • New Horizons in Human Geography (ENVS116)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To identify key geographical factors to demonstrate how geography may influence and individuals health.

    Utilise concepts including race, othering and exclusion and demonstrate how they relate to real world case studies

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify key population trends in health and how these vary geographically

    (LO2) Understand critical arguments about the role of geography in health research

    (LO3) Utilise concepts including race, othering and exclusion

    (LO4) Apply social geography theories to real world case studies

    (S1) Develop reasoned arguments

    (S2) Critically evaluate evidence

    (S3) problem-solving and decision-making skills

    (S4) self-reflective learning

    (S5) good written communication and presentation

  • Research Frontiers in Human Geography (ENVS161)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with an introduction to cutting edge debates in contemporary human geography.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of key issues in contemporary human geography

    (LO2) Recognize the contribution and interplay of key subdisciplinary areas within contemporary human geography

    (LO3) Demonstrate knowledge of a range of subdisciplinary approaches to key concepts in human geography including space and place

    (S1) Critical thinking

    (S2) Written communication

  • Study Skills and Gis (ENVS100)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop essential study and disciplinary skills required by Geographers, both for their current studies and future employment.

    Introduce students to key approaches/concepts and ideas in Geography.

    To help students identify and effectively employ appropriate sources of data and information.

    Develop students' study skills and provide essential training for subsequent years Develop students' personal transferable skills.

    To enhance student employability and make students aware of the key skills taught throughout the programme relevant to career and employability development.

    To introduce the application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to Environmental/Social Science.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to record field observations and ideas.

    (LO2) Use IT tools to find accurate and up to date information.

    (LO3) Undertake independent GPS data collection.

    (LO4) Demonstrate basic GIS interpretation and analysis techniques.

    (LO5) Plan and structure written work to University standard.

    (LO6) Ability to critically evaluate academic publications.

    (LO7) Prepare and deliver poster presentations.

    (LO8) Awareness of the importance of early planning for employability enhancement.

    (S1) Lifelong learning skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Teamwork

Year One Optional Modules

  • Contemporary Town Planning (ENVS152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Extend understanding of the form and operation of planning systems at the local level; 
    To provide practical experience of surveying, analysis and policy relevance for planning purposes; 
    To develop skills in group working, written and graphic presentation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be conversant with the process of plan preparation at the local scale and aware of current issues and debates in local planning practice

    (LO2) Be able to undertake simple local planning surveys, gather secondary data, present, analyse and interpret their findings and formulate simple plans for the development of small areas.

    (LO3) Be able to work in a group and to present their work using written and graphic methods.  

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Ecology and Conservation (ENVS157)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Using certain key themes, to introduce students to the complex and multifaceted nature of environmental issues and ecological science, particularly stressing the interrelationships between their biophysical and human dimensions.

    To encourage students to manage their own learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understandand explain fundamental principles of how ecological systems are structured andhow they function at the scale of individuals, populations and communities

    (LO2) Tounderstand the effects of human activities on communities and ecosystems at arange of timescales

    (LO3) Developan ability to critically evaluate how ecological understanding and data can beused to inform conservation policy

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S3) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S4) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Comparative Politics (POLI107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to European politics by focusing on key contemporary issues while introducing some basic concepts of political science encountered in studying this subject;

    To examine key challenges encountered when attempting to define and conceptualise Europe;

    To develop understanding of key debates around status of democracy and crisis of the nation-state in the European context;

    To examine salient transversal themes encountered in the politics of Europe, such as integration, international migration and security.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the historical development and contemporary practice of European politics.

    (LO2) A working knowledge of the principles underlying political processes and systems (electoral systems and party systems) and how they operate in the European political space.

    (LO3) An understanding of the political importance of different government structures (parliaments, the executive) at national and regional (EU) levels.

    (LO4) A knowledge of the challenges posed by contemporary political trends to European nation-states and European integration.

    (S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

  • European Politics II (POLI108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive characteristics of political institutions in selected European states; To introduce the main features of political development in a range of European countries; To provide a basis for comparison between different European political systems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of key features of contemporary European political systems in a range of countries.

    (LO2) Analytical understanding of processes of democratisation in southern and eastern Europe.

    (LO3) Ability to compare and contrast forms of executive leadership, party systems, state institutions and the political evolution of European political systems since the latter half of the nineteenth century.

    (S1) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S2) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Experiments in Physical Geography I (ENVS120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    For students to learn:

    Careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments.

    Approaches to measurement quality control via replication and reference materials.

    Appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics using MINITAB.

    Succinct and clear presentation of experimental results in poster form (Powerpoint)

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A deeper understanding of processes that underlie the interaction between people and the physical environment.

    (LO2) Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instrument; and general knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measurement.

    (LO3) Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) IT skills

  • Foundations in International Politics (POLI104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches;

    To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath;

    To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of international relations (IR) and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post Cold War period. More specifically, students will have acquired the following: An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories.  

    (LO2) Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics.

    (LO3) Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations.

    (S1) Students will be able to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of knowledge and information.

    (S2) Students will be able to demonstrate that they are able to write arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (S3) Students will acquire the ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 1 (SOCI102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    - Encourages you to think about history in sociological terms, particularly about the ways in which an understanding of the past can help to illuminate the present.

    - Provides you with an appreciation of continuity and change in social life in Britain, with an emphasis, inter alia, on politics, social policy, the economy, family life, and social and cultural relations.

    - Provides you with an understanding of how different social scientists have studied, described and explained these processes of continuity and change in various areas of social life.

    - Provides you with a way of putting wider processes of continuity and change in social, cultural, political and historical context.

    - Provides you with a foundation of theories, concepts and knowledge for study at the second and third years.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Encourages you to describe processes of social continuity and change over time in various areas of social life from a sociological perspective.

    (LO2) Encourages you to think critically about what we gain by investigating the links between the present and the past.

    (LO3) Encourages you to apply and evaluate sociological theories and concepts in relation to various conceptual, methodological and empirical issues surrounding the question of history and the analysis of social change in various areas of social life.

    (LO4) Supports the transition to modules in the second year with knowledge and understanding of key events and debates  in social, political and economic life.

    (S1) The capacity to think sociologically about various aspects of British life in historical perspective.

    (S2) The capacity to draw on theories, concepts and evidence in support of arguments and analyses.

    (S3) The capacity to critically evaluate theories, concepts and evidence used in support of others' arguments and analyses.

    (S4) Study skills: including note-taking, presenting arguments and critical thinking.

  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 2: Changing Inequalities (SOCI103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To provide students with an appreciation of the main changes that have taken place in British society since 1945, with a particular emphasis on 'race' and ethnicity, gender and social class.  
    - To provide students with an understanding of how sociologists have studied, described and explained these changes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) to describe and explain some of the main social changes that have taken place in British society since 1945 by drawing upon sociological studies.

    (LO2) to discuss the inter-relationship between 'race', ethnicity, class and gender and understand the influence of these on society.

    (LO3) to evaluate different sociological concepts and theories and relate these to broader historical, social and political contexts.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Theory and Laboratory Experiments in Earth Surface Processes (ENVS165)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module uses a lecture and laboratory-based problem-solving approach to explore some of the fundamental physical and chemical processes underlying physical geography. It is designed to provide a foundation for environmental and physical geography modules in the second and third years.

    It also aims to provide training in careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments. Throughout there is emphasis on quality control via replication and reference materials, and appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The core processes and landforms underlying major geomorphic systems

    (LO2) Long term environmental change – Pleistocene and Holocene

    (LO3) A deeper understanding of processes that underlie the interaction between people and the physical environment

    (LO4) Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instruments; and general knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measurement

    (LO5) Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis

    (S1) IT skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) Teamwork

  • Town & Country Planning: An Introduction (ENVS110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to provide an introduction to the history, theory and practice of town and country planning in Britain.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) a)  be conversant with the growth and developmeng of twon planning in Britain

    (LO2) b) be familiar with the operation of the current planning system

    (LO3) c) be able to discuss selected issues in contemporary planning theory and practice

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

  • Urban and Environmental Economics (ENVS155)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The principal objectives of the module are:

    To provide an introduction of some key micro and macro-economic concepts and principles relevant to urban and environmental policies.

    To introduce basic spatial analytical techniques and methods used to analyse economic and demographic trends and issues.

    To appreciate the ways in which economic and demographic analyses contribute to urban and environmental planning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) 1. Have a basic knowledge of the history of economic ideas and the core characteristics of differing schools of thought;

    (LO2) 2. Have a grounded understanding of the economic characteristics of land and environmental regulation;

    (LO3) 3. Be familiar with the economic reasoning used to analyse issues in the built and natural environment and be able to relate this to spatial planning practice.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Communication skills

Programme Year Two

Students will take the following compulsory modules and choose three optional modules as detailed below.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Field Class (edinburgh) (ENVS286)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The Edinburgh field class has three aims;
    To provide practical experience and training in designing, executing, analysing, writing-up and presenting a field research project in preparation for dissertation research.
    To provide practical experience of quantitative and qualitative techniques, and to critically reflect on the effectiveness and ethics of different methods in preparation for dissertation research design and write-up.
    To develop team-working and communication skills through conduct of group research projects and field presentations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Research project planning, execution and delivery.

    (LO2) Critical engagement with methods and ability to evaluate their appropriateness to a research project.

    (LO3) Qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques (at least four from the following list: archives; qualitative and quantitative secondary data, interviews, focus groups, (participant) observation, survey questionnaire).

    (LO4) Qualitative and quantitative data anlaysis techniques.

    (LO5) Qualitative and quantitative data presentation techniques (oral, visual and textual).

    (LO6) Teamwork.

    (LO7) Developed skills to undertake future independent empirical research.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) IT skills

    (S6) Adaptability

    (S7) Ethical awareness

    (S8) Leadership

    (S9) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S10) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S11) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S12) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S13) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S14) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S15) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

  • Field Class (belfast) (ENVS282)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The field class has three aims:
    To provide practical experience and training in designing, executing, analysing, writing-up and presenting a field research project in preparation for dissertation research;
    To provide practical experience of quantitative and qualitative techniques, and to critically reflect on the effectiveness and ethics of different methods in preparation for dissertation research design and write-up;
    To develop team-working and communication skills through conduct of group research projects and field presentations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learn how to plan, execute and present a research project, taking into account academic, practical, ethical and safety considerations

    (LO2) Develop a greater critical appreciation of field based data collection techniques (using at least four from the following list: archives; qualitative and quantitative secondary data, interviews, focus groups, (participant) observation, survey questionnaires)

    (LO3) Practise and enhance skills in analysing qualitative and quantitative data

    (LO4) Practise and enhance skills in presenting qualitative and quantitative data (oral, visual, textual)

    (LO5) Gain an enhanced appreciation of the factors that make for successful teamwork

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Commercial awareness

    (S5) Teamwork

    (S6) Organisational skills

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) IT skills

    (S9) Lifelong learning skills

    (S10) Ethical awareness

    (S11) Leadership

  • Field Class (glasgow) (ENVS288)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The Glasgow field class has three aims;
    To provide practical experience and training in designing, executing, analysing, writing-up and presenting a field research project in preparation for dissertation research.
    To provide practical experience of quantitative and qualitative techniques, and to critically reflect on the effectiveness and ethics of different methods in preparation for dissertation research design and write-up.
    To develop team-working and communication skills through conduct of group research projects and field presentations

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Research project planning, execution and delivery

    (LO2) Critical engagement with methods and ability to evaluate their appropriateness to a research project.

    (LO3) Qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques (at least four from the following list: archives; qualitative and quantitative secondary data, interviews, focus groups, (participant) observation, survey questionnaire)

    (LO4) Qualitative and quantitative data analysis techniques

    (LO5) Qualitative and quantitative data presentation techniques (oral, visual and textual)

    (LO6) Teamwork

    (LO7) Developed skills to undertake future independent empirical research

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) IT skills

    (S6) Adaptability

    (S7) Ethical awareness

    (S8) Leadership

    (S9) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S10) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S11) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S12) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S13) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S14) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S15) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • Field Class (cardiff) (ENVS280)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    T​he  field class has three aims:

    1. to provide practical experience and training in designing, executing, analysing, writing-up and presenting a field research project in preparation for dissertation research

    2. to provide practical experience of quantitative and qualitative techniques, and to critically reflect on the effectiveness and ethics of different methods in preparation for dissertation research design and write-up

    3. to develop team-working and communication skills through conduct of group research projects and field presentations

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Learn how to plan, execute and present a research project, taking into account academic, practical, ethical and safety considerations

    ​Develop a greater critical appreciation of field based data collection techniques (using at least four from the following list: archives; qualitative and quantitatvie secondary data, interviews, focus groups, (participant) observation, survey questionnaires)

    Practise and enhance skills in analysing qualitative and quantitative data

    ​Practise and enhance skills in presenting qualitative and quantitative data (oral, visual, textual)

    Gain an enhanced appreciation of the factors that make for successful teamwork

  • Principles and Theory in Geography (ENVS249)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop a critical and reflexive sense of the nature of geography as a dynamic, plural and contested discipline;
    To become aware of major theoretical and conceptual frameworks used in Geography;
    To develop an understanding of cutting edge debates in physical and human Geography;
    To develop an understanding of the interrelations and interface between physical and human Geography, particularly around environmental issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Critically evaluate key perspectives on human and physical geography, and to situate them in the history of the discipline.

    (LO2) Apply different styles of spatial thinking to particular contexts and research questions.

    (LO3) Engage in theoretical understanding of the behaviour of complex social and physical systems, and the approached to their modelling.

    (LO4) Understand the relevance of theoretical debates for their own research practices.

    (LO5) Understand the interface between physical and human Geography, and be able to illustrate how this can help in the analysis of environmental problems.

    (S1) Teamwork: Students will be asked to work in groups to complete mini formative assessments ahead of scheduled workshop sessions

    (S2) Organisational skills: Students will be asked to work in groups to complete mini formative assessments ahead of scheduled workshop sessions

    (S3) IT skills: Students will be expected to engage with IT packages such as MS word and Power Point during the course

    (S4) Communication skills: students will be asked to give a 5 minute formative presentation in the workshop sessions

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • Research Skills (geography and Environmental Science) (ENVS203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide students with training in research methods and analysis techniques

    Develop students' understanding and appreciation of the Environmental Sciences as a contemporary academic discipline

    Nurture students' understanding of, and engagement with, theoretical and methodological issues in the Environmental Sciences

    Develop students' skills of critical analysis and academic writing

    Support students' preparation for individual research projects

    Develop students' study and personal transferable skills

    Develop students' awareness of careers and employability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge of the development of Geography and the Environmental Sciences in recent decades

    (LO2) Demonstrate an appreciation of the nature and appropriate use of different methodological strategies

    (LO3) Making use of newly-developed research skills and knowledge, identify a research problem or subject and design an appropriate research strategy

    (LO4) Write a dissertation proposal in an academic style with appropriate illustrations, citations and references

    (LO5) Enhanced ability to write an essay in a technical English academic style

    (LO6) Make an oral presentation on a researched topic to a small group

    (LO7) Develop personal employability skills through application letter and CV development

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) Communication skills

    (S6) IT skills

  • Exploring the Social World (ENVS225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - provide students with the knowledge of the different research methodologies that are available to carry out research in Geography and more widely in the Social Sciences;
    - provide students with the knowledge of the research process in the Social Sciences;
    - enable students to define coherent research questions that can be addressed by different research methods;
    - enable students to recognise the problems and limitations associated with certain research methods, instruments for data collection and techniques for data analysis;
    - enable students to make informed decisions on the most appropriate methodological choices to carry out their own research;
    - prepare students to carry out their own research in the Social Sciences;

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand theparadigms deployed by qualitative and quantitative Social Science research

    (LO2) To understand the main methods used in Social Science research

    (LO3) To understand the limitations of existing research methods

    (LO4) To criticallyassess the main types of contemporary Social Science research methods

    (LO5) To select appropriate methods to evaluate empirically assessable research questions

    (LO6) To have basic training in data collection, exploration and analysis methods

    (LO7) To reflect and set attainable objectives, priorities, action plans and schedules of work to achieve objectives (Planning & Organization)

    (LO8) To critically assess a problem and find the best possible data collection, exploration and analysis approach (Problem Solving)

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • An Introduction to Environmental History (ENVS223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module seeks to introduce students to the discipline of Environmental History, examining the different ways in which human-environment interactions have changed through time. Providing students with a knowledge of how present interactions have been shaped by past activities, and how these can be used to better understand the future.  It forms a basis for more advanced environmental courses in Year 3.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module, students should be able:- 1. Demonstrate an understanding of global environmental history from the pre-history to the present day. 2. To have a demonstrable understanding and ability to critically evaluate the impact on the earth of: the domestication of plants and animals; the agricultural and industrial revolutions from the eighteenth century; and present day processes of globalisation and resource management. 3. To critically explain the consequences of desertification and deforestation.4. To critically evaluate present day academic and policy perspectives on the sustainability of agricultural and industrial systems. 5. To engage with debates on environmental philosophy and ethics. Achievement of these objectives will be assessed by examination.

    (S1) Communication skills

  • Catchment Hydrology (ENVS217)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to enable students to investigate and understand the main hydrological processes operating in drainage catchments in terms of their measurement, operation and controlling factors. The module will provide students with a 'hands-on' experience of both observing hydrology and modelling hydrological systems, with an emphasis on applied learning, which might be useful in a vocational sense in the future. The module will aim to deliver excellent training for students in the knowledge required to work in a wide variety of environmentally-facing careers, including those with the EA, Natural England or DEFRA, as well as Environmental Consultancies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the key hydrological components of the catchment system

    (LO2) Explain the main controlling factors on hydrological processes occurring within drainage catchments

    (LO3) Analyse and predict the response of catchments to rainfall events

    (LO4) Evaluate methods used to predict river flows

    (LO5) Review the environmental variables that control lake functioning and eutrophication

  • Changing Environments (ENVS214)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    At the end of this module, students will have  a strong understanding of the mechanisms that have shaped our landscape over time; laboratory and computer skills to yield environmental reconstructions; a critical insight of the different techniques and methodologies for reconstructing past environments; an understanding of the importance to study the past to forecast future environmental change.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of this module, students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the global changes that have affected the Earth in the recent past

    (LO2) Students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the key characteristics of important depositional environments

    (LO3) Students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the major environmental indicators used  in these environments and the dating techniques

    (LO4) Through practical work, you will have acquired practical knowledge of different laboratory techniques needed for environmental reconstruction.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Cities and Regions (ENVS230)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To equip students with an understanding of the nature of urban and regional change and the policy issues that it presents.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand, and be able to discuss, the economic, social and environmental causes of urban and regional change

    (LO2) Understand, and be able to analyse, the consequences of urban and regional change for local economies, environments and societies

    (LO3) Understand, and be able to predict, the policy issues arising from the consequences of urban and regional change

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) International awareness

  • Climatology (ENVS231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module aims to provide knowledge and understanding across a number of areas of meteorology and weather, covering physical processes. These processes are covered at a detailed level and supported by an overview of the subject area. This module gives the scientific foundation for more discursive as well as process orientated final year modules. The practicals provide an introduction to aspects of meteorological analysis. These are supported through the general lecture programme.  The practical series add to the learning experience and skills to enable students to apply what is learnt in the lecture programme.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate appropriate theories, methods and techniques

    (LO2) Recognise how selected environments interact with appropriate atmospheric and weather processes

    (LO3) Understand different weather from high, mid and tropical latitudes

    (LO4) Apply practical data analysis.

    (S1) The handling of large datasets

    (S2) Written and graphical communication

    (S3) Analysis and problem-solving through quantitative and qualitative methods

    (S4) Numeracy and statistical literacy

  • Comparing Welfare States (SOCI207)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    A1) Provide an understanding of Esping-Andersen’s typology of welfare regimes, ‘the three worlds of welfare capitalism’.
    (A2) Introduce the concepts of ‘decommodification’, ‘destratification’ and ‘systems of exchange’ and explain their significance in understanding ‘the mixed economy of welfare’ in different countries.
    (A3) Set out a systematic approach for critically assessing claims about the similarities and differences between welfare ‘regimes’.
    (A4) Compare and contrast welfare settlements in liberal, conservative and social democratic regimes with reference to the examples of the USA, Germany and Sweden.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge of Esping-Andersen’s typology of welfare regimes.

    (LO2) Link Esping-Andersen’s typology to the concepts of '(de)commodification' and '(de)stratification'.

    (LO3) Use that typology as a basis for comparing and contrasting welfare settlements in different countries.

    (LO4) Draw on evidence to critically assess claims about the similarities and differences between welfare regimes, including Esping-Andersen’s own claims.

    (LO5) Connect the development of welfare to the ‘political economy’ of capitalist societies.

    (LO6) Outline how ‘the mixed economy of welfare’ in different countries changes over time in response to wider social, political and economic challenges and crises.

    (S1) Comparative analysis

    (S2) Using conceptual frameworks to approach claims about the similarities and differences between the political economy of welfare states systematically

    (S3) Locating, analysing and critically assessing the relative strengths and weakenesses of different forms of evidence and the claims made on the basis of that evidence.

    (S4) Communication: presenting the results of analysis in a structured, clear and considered manner.

  • Deviance, Youth and Culture (SOCI252)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the main academic literature sources relevant to the study of deviance and deviancy.

    To examine historical and contemporary debates on deviancy in the UK and beyond.

    To examine the different functions and strategies of the media and culture to ‘policing’ youth.

    To provide a critical insight into the key cultural practices of deviance.

    To identify the form of power that constitutes deviant practices.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Use and apply the main sources of deviancy literature for sociological research and analysis of social and political life.

    (LO2) Understand the relationship between deviancy, culture and youth as a contested form of social regulation.

    (LO3) Evaluate the impact and effects of media representations, discourses, ideology and media technologies in the construction of deviance and criminality.

    (LO4) Appreciate and situate cultural practices of resistance as part of the process of social ordering.

    (LO5) Demonstrate the relationship between theory, analysis and interpretation and the skills associated with evaluation and presentation.

    (S1) Competence in using sociological and criminological theory and concepts relating to deviance in order to understand the relationship between deviancy and culture and respond critically to crime and deviance.

    (S2) Appreciate the historical complexity and diversity of the ways in which deviancy and disorder is produced, perceived, practiced and dealt with in society.

    (S3) The ability to identify the most important conceptual arguments in a text and to discuss, address and develop theoretical accounts of deviancy in group discussions.

    (S4) Be able to assess and evaluate the role of the media in the construction of deviance and public disorder.

    (S5) Written and oral communication skills, including the clear presentation of academic debates, and the student’s own arguments supported with evidence.

    (S6) Critical thinking skills, including the ability to be evaluative with academic material relating to deviancy and draw appropriate conclusions.

  • Environmental Sustainability (ENVS218)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to; introduce students to current thinking in relation to sustainable development and locate environmental sustainability within this broader framework of ideas;
    Develop an understanding of various dimensions of environmental sustainability and their relationship to patterns of human development;
    Develop an understanding of the role of the public and private sectors in promoting environmentally sustainable development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students completing the course successfully should be aware of current thinking in relation to sustainable development and be able to locate environmental sustainability within this broader framework of ideas

    (LO2) Students completing the course successfully should have an understanding of various dimensions of environmental sustainability and their relationship to patterns of development;

    (LO3) Students completing the course successfully should develop an understanding of the role of the public and private sectors in promoting environmentally sustainable development.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) International awareness

  • Geomorphology: Ice, Sea and Air (ENVS252)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The module aims  to 1) develop an understanding of major geomorphic systems  and 2) how they create terrestrial landforms.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding ofthe functioning of major geomorphic processes

    (LO2) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the relationship between geomorphic processes and climate

    (LO3) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the magnitude, frequency and spatial scales and timescales under which geomorphic processes operate

    (LO4) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the importance of linkages between geomorphic process, material and resulting landform (energy/material interaction).

    (S1) Field work: measuring and quantifying an observable process

    (S2) Group work: generating data through team work

    (S3) Study skill

    (S4) Field work: logging and mapping sediments in lateral and vertical succession

  • Gis for Human Geography (ENVS257)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to develop an understanding of how and why GIS may be useful in the social sciences. It will introduce students to the fundamentals of GIS and enable students to develop both (i) theoretical knowledge of GIS and (ii) a practical ability to apply GIS in the handling and analysis of spatial data in a human geography context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a sound understanding of the principles of GIS in a social science context

    (LO2) Students will understand how to implement the basic functions of GIS.

    (LO3) Students will know how to apply a number of spatial analysis techniques and how to interpret the results, in the process of turning data into information.

    (LO4) Students, when faced with a new dataset, will be able to work independently using a GIS.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S4) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S5) Numeracy/computational skills - Numerical methods

  • Political Economies of Globalisation (ENVS264)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    This module introduces students to the study of globalisation. It will be of interest to those who wish to learn how capitalism is transformed, and what challenges this transformation entails for the functioning of national and local economies, states and societies. Specifically, the course examines the changes globalisation has wrought in political life and how globalisation has been contested. Having acquired a basic knowledge of inequalities in the global economy, students will learn how the adverse consequences of globalisation can be challenged, and what are the possibilities of democratic governance in the age of globalisation. By taking this module students will prepare themselves for a more advanced study of international political economy and development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students should: Know and analyse the main paradigms and perspectives on globalisation, mainstream and heterodox Have a basic understanding of the workings of the global political economy Be familiar with and be able to analyse the existing examples of anti-globalisation movements. Understand the contested nature of processes of ‘neoliberalisation.’

    (LO4) Understand the contested nature of processes of ‘neoliberalisation.’

    (S1) Ethical awareness

    (S2) Adaptability

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) International awareness

    (S5) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

  • Population and Societies (ENVS221)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The module aims to Provide an understanding and explanation of the main societal and cultural determinants of a wide range of demography and other events, including being born ; leaving home ; moving home ; partnering ; having sex ; having children ; experiencing well-being , falling ill and dying; Describe and account for how these events lead to spatial and temporal variations in population growth rates and structures Examine the relevance of the demographic and epidemiological (health) transitions to developing countries, and, Assess the future global population prospects. The module aims to move far beyond the basic population geography presented in GCSE and A-level syllabuses by providing;
    Greater breadth and depth of coverage.
    Direct exposure to the population-related research of current staff.
    Greater critical engagement with the material covered.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and explain the main societal and cultural determinants of a wide range of demographic and other events, including being born; leaving home; moving home; partnering; having sex; having children; experiencing well-being, falling ill and dying

    (LO2) Describe and account for how these events lead to  spatial and temporal variations in population growth rates and structures

    (LO3) Critically examine the relevance of the demographic and epidemiological (health) transitions to developing countries.

    (LO4) Critically assess the future global population prospects

  • Rural Geographies (ENVS227)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    To develop a critical awareness of the changes taking place in contemporary rural areas.
    To stimulate informed debate about the geographical difference and inequalities in rural areas both in the UK and Europe.
    To draw attention to, and encourage critique of, the empirical studies and conceptual approaches taken by geographers and social scientists to the study of these issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module, students should be able, at threshold level, to: To critically appraise the studies of geographers and other social scientists to rural issues and the varying conceptual approaches taken to their study.

    (LO2) To articulate how rurality is interconnected with space, economy, politics, society, culture, and nature.

    (LO3) To analyse how rurality shapes and is shaped by political-economic change, social recomposition and cultural meaningfulness.

    (LO4) To critically evaluate the responses by national and local governments, rural communities and other organizations to such changes

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • Social and Cultural Geographies (ENVS275)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    By the end of this module, we aim for you to:
    Have an understanding of the sub-fields of social and cultural geographies;
    Be able to engage with philosophical debates within social and cultural geographies;
    Have developed skills in reading and writing critically;
    Be able to recognise the heterogeneity of social categories;
    Have an understanding of key concepts within the field including social construction, spatial contingency, performance, intersectionality, material cultures and mobilities;
    Be able to link theoretical debates with empirical examples;
    Have an appreciation of the range of methods used in social and cultural geographies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of the sub-fields of social and cultural geographies;

    (LO2) Be able to engage with philosophical debates within social and cultural geographies;

    (LO3) Have developed skills in reading and writing critically;

    (LO4) Be able to recognise the heterogeneity of social categories;

    (LO5) Have an understanding of key concepts within the field including social construction, spatial contingency, performance, intersectionality, material cultures and mobilities;

    (LO6) Be able to link theoretical debates with empirical (academic) examples.

    (S1) Ethical awareness

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions

  • Soils, Slopes and the Environment (ENVS238)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To understand the fundamental properties and characteristics of slopes and soils, understand slope and soil forming processes and evolution and to apply this knowledge to a number of pure and applied problems relating to slope and soil stability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the fundamental physical, chemical and biological properties of soils.

    (LO2) Use your knowledge of the fundamental physical, chemical and biological properties of soils to classify them

    (LO3) Understand the processes of soil formation.

    (LO4) Understand the factors that affect slope and soil stability

    (LO5) Explain the processes of soil erosion, why they vary in time and space, and describe how they shape the landscape.

    (LO6) Explain why landslides/mass movements occur.

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Problem solving skills

    (S6) Numeracy

    (S7) Leadership

  • Strategic Plan Making (ENVS210)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module provides an introduction to the methods and techniques that are used in the preparation and implementation of strategic plans and policies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) be familiar with the main elements of the planning process and techniques associated with them

    (LO2) understand planning documents, including how they are prepared and the different functions they serve;

    (LO3) demonstrate a critical perspective on current planning formats;

    (LO4) understand ther role of plans in shaping places and how the theory of plan making has changed over time

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Communication skills

  • Urban Morphology and Place-making (ENVS256)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Th e specific objectives of the module are to: introduce students to the analysis of the qualities and characteristics of the urban fabric; introduce a working knowledge of design approaches regarding the urban environment; introduce the formative design skills and techniques related to site planning; relate urban design issues to the broader planning agenda including development processes and products.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) understand the basic sequence of urban design in history as it helped shape urban places

    (LO2) have the ability to appraise the qualities and character of an area in urban design terms

    (LO3) an understanding of contemporary theories as they relate to urban design

    (LO4) be conversant with basic design and presentation skills needed for urban design projects

    (LO5) have the ability to make proposals to enhance the spatial qualities of urban places

    (LO6) have a basic knowledge of site planning and design issues and their resolution

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Teamwork

  • Urban Sociology (SOCI236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To provide an introduction to classical and contemporary social scientific approaches to the study of urban life

    - To introduce key classical and contemporary academic studies of urbanism

    - To situate the distinctive contribution made by sociologists to our understanding of cities

    - To critically examine key empirical studies on the social and cultural aspects of city life

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An awareness of the landmark social studies of modern urbanism

    (LO2) An appreciation of the spatial form taken by social inequalities in urban capitalist contexts

    (LO3) Capacity to describe and assess some of the major political interventions in city life in the modern period

    (LO4) Understanding of the relationship between theoretical and methodological studies of the urban

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

Programme Year Three

Students will select one compulsory module and choose six (four if taking the optional field class module) optional modules as detailed below.

One optional (30 credit) field class module:

North America or Barcelona

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Geography Dissertation (ENVS321)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with the opportunity to apply theorectical concepts to real-life situations.
    To alow students to identify a research question, devise a research methodology and conduct a research project on a topic of their choice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Anunderstanding of how to use independent research to address a specific researchquestion, including understanding the diversity of techniques and approachesinvolved in collecting geographical information

    (LO2) Anunderstanding of how to design and undertake a research project to answer thatquestion, including understanding issues involved in research design andexecution

    (LO3) Theability to produce  an independent reviewof academic literature relating to a specific research question

    (LO4) The ability to collect,synthesise and analyse primary and secondary geographical data

    (LO5) Theability to write-up a research project using an appropriate academic style andstructure, including the techniques and approaches required to presentgeographical data

    (LO6) Thedevelopment of time- and project-management skills, including the ability tocoordinate and complete a project independent of close supervision (i.e. managea project independently)

    (S1) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S6) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S7) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Geography Work-based Dissertation (ENVS323)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims;
    To provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to real-life situations.
    To allow students to identify a research question, devise a research methodology and conduct a research project on a topic of their choice.
    To give students the opportunity to develop transferable skills in a workplace context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of how to useindependent research to address a specific research question, includingunderstanding the diversity of techniques and approaches involved in collectinggeographical information

    (LO2) An understanding of how to design and undertake a research project to answer thatquestion, including understanding issues involved in research design andexecution

    (LO3) An understanding of how to designand undertake a research project to answer that question, includingunderstanding issues involved in research design and execution

    (LO4) The ability to collect,synthesise and analyse primary and secondary geographical data

    (LO5) Theability to write-up a research project using an appropriate academic style andstructure, including the techniques and approaches required to presentgeographical data

    (LO6) Thedevelopment of time- and project-management skills, including the ability tocoordinate and complete a project independent of close supervision (i.e. managea project independently)

    (LO7) Experience of working alongside a workplace partner to address aresearch question of relevance to that workplace

    (LO8) The ability to write up research findings for a non-academicaudience in the form of a report

    (S1) Business and customer awareness basic understanding of the key drivers for business success – including the importance of innovation and taking calculated risks – and the need to provide customer satisfaction and build customer loyalty

    (S2) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S3) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S4) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S5) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S7) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S8) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Climate Change - A Critical Review (ENVS389)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The module aims to provide students with the knowledge to evaluate likely outcomes climate change and climate variability over the next 100 years, to understand policy decisions at different levels, to obtain a critical understanding of climate predictions, and to understand the importance of reference to past and present climates.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate a range of future climate change projections .

    (LO2) Recognise the likely impacts of climate change to a range of sectors.

    (LO3) Learn how to engage with stakeholder communities with regard to climate change. 

    (LO4) Produce effectively targeted report writing and visual communication.

    (LO5) Consider the multiple sector impact of climate change on societies

    (S1) Learning and studying, Developing autonomous learning and metacognition  decision making and prioritising tasks

    (S2) Communication in formats appropriate to the audience

    (S3) Awareness of responsibility as a local, national and international citizen with a global perspective

    (S4) Taking responsibility for learning and reflection upon that learning

  • Coastal Environments: Spatial and Temporal Change (ENVS376)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to consider the response of physical processes and coastal environments to changes in sea-level and climate. Attention is given to the geomorphology of coastal environments, its response to external agents, as well as to possible coastal management strategies. The module aims at proving students with knowledge and understanding of the physical processes acting along coastal areas, and to promote students capability to critically understand pros and cons of different management techniques in relation to future climate change.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understanding of physical aspects of coastal environments

    (LO2) Knowledge and understanding of the concept of spatial and temporal variation: physical processes and landforms, and the importance of spatial and temporal scales

    (LO3) Knowledge and understanding of environments as a result of process and form interaction

    (LO4) Knowledge and understanding of methodologies of analysis and interpretation

    (LO5) Development of an informed concern for the Earth and its people

    (LO6) Capability to critically analyze real case studies in the context of previously acquired knowledge

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

  • Geographies of Bodies and Borders (ENVS344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop students' critical understanding of the relationship between bodies, identities and everyday politics ·

    To develop students' critical understanding of the ways in which power operates on bodies at a range of scales including geopolitics,national health policy, the home and the media ·

    To allow students to apply critical geographical theory(particularly feminist and poststructural theory) to case studies and examplesfrom contemporary geographical research

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of Foucauldian and feminist theory as it relates to bodies and public health

    (LO2) Have an understanding of contemporary geopolitics in relation to borders and carceral geographies

    (LO3) Be able to recognise and critically assess the role of biopolitics and geopolitics in relation to a range of contemporary institutional spaces

    (LO4) Have an understanding of key concepts in the field including: surveillance, biopolitics, governmentality, agency and autonomy, morality, power and resistance, citizenship and civility, geopolitics and boundary-making

    (LO5) Be able to engage with debates in the above fields and apply them to empirical (academic) examples

    (LO6) Have developed skills in reading and writing critically

    (LO7) Be able to provide critical commentary on the importance of politics and governance in everyday life

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Ethical awareness

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Fluvial Environments (ENVS372)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To develop understanding of functioning and stability/instability characteristics of fluvial geomorphic systems - in both humid and arid regions over timescales from the Pleistocene to the present day

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, a student should be able to:-1. Describe and analyse the functioning of fluvial systems and apply major concepts (Assessed by exam)

    (LO2) 2. Explain the different temporal and spatial scales on which variations occur (Assessed by exam and essay)

    (LO3) 3. Analyse and evaluate the likely factors influencing fluvial responses (Assessed by essay and exam)

    (LO4) 4. Analyse and use field evidence of fluvial processes and landforms (Assessed by use of field experience in exam and essay)

    (LO5) 5. Critically evaluate and synthesise published literature (Assessed by essay)

    (S1) Lifelong learning skills

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

  • Gender, the Body and Identity (SOCI315)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To introduce and review developments in social, cultural and philosophical theories of gender.
    - To develop conceptual tools to understand and engage with feminist debates on gender, the body and identity.
    - To examine a number of different and contrasting theoretical approaches which place gender, the body and identity at the centre of analysis: including feminist sociology, radical feminism, corporeal feminism, post-structural feminism, black feminism, queer theory and material feminism
    - To evaluate the form and structure of feminist arguments on the meaning and experience of gender for understandings of the body and power.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have knowledge of recent developments in social, philosophical and cultural theories of gender.

    (LO2) Have an in depth understanding of the conceptual tools which surround theories of gender, the body and identity.

    (LO3) Understand the key points of overlap and critical tensions between and within structuralist, constructivist, post-structuralist and materialist feminist theoretical frameworks.

    (LO4) Demonstrate the relationship between theory, analysis and interpretation and the skills associated with evaluation and presentation.

    (S1) Competence in using feminist theory and the concepts relating to gender in order to understand the relationship between the body and identity

    (S2) Appreciate the complexity and diversity of the ways in which gender is theorised, practiced and dealt with in society.

    (S3) The ability to identify the most important conceptual arguments in a text and to discuss, address and develop theoretical accounts in group discussions.

    (S4) Written skills, including the clear presentation of academic debates, and the student’s own arguments supported with evidence.

    (S5) Critical thinking skills, including the ability to be evaluative with academic material relating to gender and draw appropriate conclusions.

  • Geographic Data Science (ENVS363)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module provides students with core competences in Geographic Data Science (GDS). Thisincludes the following: Advancing their statistical and numerical literacy. Introducing basic principles of programming and state-of-the-art computational tools for GDS. Presenting a comprehensive overview of the main methodologies available to the Geographic Data Scientist, as well as their intuition as to how and when they can be applied. Focusing on real world applications of these techniques in a geographical and applied context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate advanced GIS/GDS concepts and be able to use the tools programmaticallyto import, manipulate and analyse data in different formats.

    (LO2) Understand the motivation and inner workings of the main methodological approaches ofGDS, both analytical and visual.

    (LO3) Critically evaluate the suitability of a specific technique, what it can offer and how it canhelp answer questions of interest.

    (LO4) Apply a number of spatial analysis techniques and how to interpret the results, in theprocess of turning data into information.

    (LO5) When faced with a new data-set, work independently using GIS/GDS tools programmatically.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

    (S6) Communication skills

  • Poland: Political, Social and Cultural Geographies Since 1939 (ENVS313)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This third year course will introduce students to specific geographical developments in Poland since 1939. The course will be structured around three key time periods: second world war, socialism, post-socialism. Within these, shifts in the control and use of space will be explored. The second world war theme will consider the impact of war on population and territory in Poland, and the subsequent contestations surrounding wartime memory within the country. A key focus will be on museums and memorial sites as contested sites of memory. The second part of the course will consider the spatial dimensions of everyday life under socialism, including: political uses of public and private space, queuing and the shortage economy, imagined geographies of the west, resistances. The final section will investigate changes in Poland since 1989 - to what extent the country has 'returned to Europe', the impact of shock therapy on social geographies, and how Poland is still working through socialist legacies. Special attention will also be given to Polish migration, before and after EU accession. Ultimately this module will enable an in-depth empirical knowledge of a key site of change in contemporary Europe, while encouraging deep engagement with a range of historical, political, social, cultural and post-socialist geographical readings.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A deep understanding of the specific contexts of historical, political, social and cultural geographies of Poland

    (LO2) An in-depth knowledge of the contested nature and emplacement of wartime remembering in Poland, the spatial dynamics of life under socialist rule, and seismic changes in Poland since 1989

    (LO3) A wider appreciation of shifting geo-political developments in Europe over the last few decades

    (LO4) A good familiarity with the sub-disciplinary field of socialist/post-socialist geography

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) International awareness

  • Building Better Worlds (ENVS387)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To examine understandings of how the world and social relations are reproduced and co-created by people who understand what is wrong and what needs to be changed, and that everyone, including students themselves, have the capacity to make or inhibit change in their everyday and work lives.

    To consider that politics are not solely what happens in elections – but are part and parcel of everyday life.

    To consider how people in different places have struggled for justice, including global examples over the past 500 years.

    To develop an understanding of how people and communities have agency and the ability to shape their future.

    To examine the socially constructed nature of the world, as well as how people organize to co-create the realities and cultures they would like to be a part of and live in.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the array of differing knowledges, ethics, and practices that are found within and across differing social movements

    (LO2) Analyse contemporary social movements and notions of living with dignity using a wide array of varying theoretical frameworks

    (LO3) Understand the range of tactics and strategies available to social movements with respect to both engaging in resistance and constructing alternatives

    (LO4) Understand the differing ways in which structural and historical challenges are defined by theorists and communities, as well as how social movements respond to them

    (LO5) Analyse the development of a specific social movement using theory and conceptualisations of resistance, alternatives, and transformation

    (LO6) Understand the range of responses open to opponents of social movements that enable them to support or hinder their aims

    (LO7) Analyse how protest and mobilisation both from grassroots and elite groups has accelerated and limited the possibilities for progress towards social change

    (S1) Ethical awareness

    (S2) International awareness

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S6) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S7) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S8) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Human-environmental Interactions (ENVS315)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to demonstrate and review how successful management of modern and future landscapes often requires a long time perspective.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learning outcomes are: a knowledge of appropriate theory about environmental change

    (LO2) a deeper understanding of interactions between human activities and landscape in space and time

    (LO3) a critical view of the assumptions on which landscape management decisions and future modelled states are based; 

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Organisational skills

  • Ireland: Political, Social and Cultural Geographies (ENVS399)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students will develop their knowledge of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present. Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape. The module seeks to foster an undertanding of contemporary Irish identity,culture, society and politics. The module aims to develop students' skills of interdisciplinary study relating Ireland and it's past.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will obtain an overview of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present.

    (LO2) Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape.

    (LO3) Students will develop knowlege of contemporary Irish identity

    (LO4) Students will develop interdisciplinary study skills.

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Adaptability

  • Issues in Geography (ENVS385)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    One: To give students the chance to examine a topic or an approach which is new to them. By Year Three, students usually have well-focused areas of study, based on dissertations and module choices. This module allows students to take a step back from this focus and to consider new areas of investigation.

    Two: To extend and assess students' abilities in a range of areas, emphasising communication skills:

    - Identification of a suitable area of study
    - Independent research skills
    - Proposal writing
    - Oral presentation
    - Essay writing

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and formulate a topic, requiring information gathering and synthesis of widely ranging information types

    (LO2) Effectively communicate ideas through oral and written media

    (LO3) Competently handle current communications technology

    (LO4) Synthesise arguments and evidence

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) International awareness

    (S3) Lifelong learning skills

  • Maritime Geographies (ENVS339)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to enable students to develop:

    A critical understanding of how historically, maritime worlds have shaped global geographies;

    An awareness of how physically, the seas have shaped port cities;

    A deep knowledge of how in the present era, oceans are vital to legal, economic and environmental concerns.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Communicate knowledge ofthe place of seas and oceans in the discipline of geography;

    (LO2) Demonstratea critical understanding of understanding how historically, maritime worlds haveshaped global geographies; how physically, the seas have shaped and impact onport cities; and in the present era how oceans are vital to legal, economic andenvironmental concerns;

    (LO3)  Engagecritically with literature and documentation concerning maritime geographies;

    (LO4) Criticallyassess and evaluate the geographies of seas and oceans in the context of maritime Merseyside.

    (LO5) Presentknowledge and critical discussion of the role of maritime worlds for physical andhuman geographies in written form.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) IT skills

    (S6) Lifelong learning skills

    (S7) International awareness

    (S8) Commercial awareness

  • Natural Hazards and Society (ENVS319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To introduce contextual perspectives on a variety of natural hazards, the different levels of impact on human societies and the mitigation/adaptation strategies adopted before, during and after an extreme natural event.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the physical and societal definitions of a natural hazard

    (LO2) An understanding of the processes leading to geophysical, hydrological, meteorological and climatological hazards

    (LO3) An awareness of the vulnerability of societies

    (LO4) An appreciation of the costs on these extremes events on societies

    (LO5) Acquire a sound knowledge on mitigation and adaptation strategies for each type of natural hazard

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) International awareness

  • Peace Activism in A Dangerous World (IRIS322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide a detailed overview of the different forms of peacebuilding that have taken place both within Northern Ireland and globally;  

    To investigate the role that such activism has played in Peace Processes and in post-conflict transformation;

    To assess its efficacy. ​

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will acquire an understanding of the nature of  peace activism in Northern Ireland and other conflicts, such as the Balkans and Rwanda

    They will be able to determine its relevance both socially and politically, make comparisons between the different forms of work and understand the key debates within the field. ​

    Through their seminar presentations and written work, students will develop analytical and research skills by using a wide-range of source material, such as first-hand accounts of those directly involved and government reports as well as the academic literature. ​

    The seminars will encourage students to debate the merits of primary sources and present arguments concisely. ​

  • Politics of the Environment (ENVS325)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This unit is designed to critically evaluate the political responses to the growing impact that environmental issues and the concept of sustainability are having on decision making at all levels of governance, (international, national and local). More specifically the unit aims to;
    Develop an understanding of the growing importance of environmental and sustainable development thinking in political decision-making processes.
    Explore different environmental attitudes, values and perspectives and examine the impact on various political perspectives.
    Develop an understanding of the opportunities and limitations of environmental decision making international dimension of environmental politics and its impact on nation states.
    Understand the role that environmental pressure groups have in shaping political decisions at the international, national and local levels of governance.
    Explore the policy responses at national and local levels to the new emerging environmental agenda.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) an appreciation of how environmental issues are being developed at all levels of governance

    (LO2) an understanding of different environmental values and attitudes and the way that these impact upon political philosophy and decision-making;

    (LO3) an understanding of the way that various environmental interest groups impact on political and other decision making processes an understanding of the way that various environmental intereste groups impact on political and other decision making processes

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Postcolonial Geographies (ENVS334)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This level three module aims to explore the relevance of postcolonial ideas to understanding the contemporary world.

    The module will also aims to applying theoretical ideas to a number of case studies. The first section will deal with colonialism and its legacies in formerly colonised areas, particularly South Asia. This section will allow students to critically interrogate processes such as development and political activism in the global south. The second section of the module will deal with the effects of colonialism on countries which are former colonial powers, and will allow students to interpret processes such as migration and multiculturalism.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will understand the historical origins of global interdependence and inequality;

    (LO2) An understanding of how postcolonial theory has challenged 'Western' schools of thought (such as 'development', or the idea of 'Orientalism')

    (LO3) An understanding of the 'real-world' consequences of imperialism and colonialism in the present (for example, the effects of 'multiculturalism' in different countries).

    (LO4) Students will understand the interlinked relationships between peoples (e.g. ethnicities, cultures) and places (e.g. nations, regions);

    (LO5) By the end of the module, students will have the ability to apply postcolonial theories to contemporary case studies

    (LO6) Through the module assessment, students will develop skills in the analysis of cultural products (e.g. film, television, museum exhibits)

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Ethical awareness

  • 'race', Community and Identity (SOCI346)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To explore the impact of colonialism on patterns of migration to Britain in the post war period and the creation of greater ethnic diversity.  
    - To examine the changing nature of racism as an ideology by exploring and contextualising scientific and institutional forms of racisms and 'newer' manifestations through Islamophobia. 
    - To examine the conflictual relationship between the state and minority ethnic communities through an examination of specific case studies
    - To unpack constructions of ethnic and national identity in the context of post-colonial Britain

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To critically distingusih and evaluate different academic and political perspectives.

    (LO2) Display an awareness of continuity and historical change in relation to 'race' and British society

    (LO3) To have some understanding of the relationship between broader socio-economic and political context and the issues of 'race' and identify

    (LO4) Recognise the way Britain's former imperial position has impacted upon recent pluralities of identity and multicultural development

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Social and Spatial Inequalities (ENVS357)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    · Gain an understanding of several core areas of social and spatial inequalities and how these inter-relate, and to engage with academic debates about these issues;
    Explore evidence for, and interpretations of, social and spatial inequalities, eg labour market, ethnic, spatial aspects of poverty;
    Gain an understanding of the geographies of social inequalities, including why inequalities are not equal between places, and what the implications of this unevenness are for individuals and communities;
    Consider how and why social inequalities have persisted and/or changed over time, with reference to allied theories and empirical evidence;
    Gain acritical understanding of the meaning and measurement of inequalities, poverty and deprivation;
    Identify and review the types of data sources that can be used to explore social and spatial inequalities ;
    Explore the wider UK context for the development of social and spatial inequalities, including economic restructuring and welfare reform;
    Consider representations of inequalities in the media, policy and political debate;
    Consider a number of policy developments/responses to problems of social and spatial inequalities, and to highlight their impact.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Develop anunderstanding of social and spatial inequalities, how these inter-relate, andhow the terms have been (mis-)used in academic, political, policy and public discourses

    (LO2) Develop anunderstanding of how and why social and spatial inequalities might havepersisted over time, and review the empirical evidence for this

    (LO3) Understand how and why social inequalities havespecific geographies and can be concentrated in particular areas orneighbourhoods

    (LO4) Understand the difficulties in defining andmeasuring social and spatial inequalities, and how such definitions may relateto broader theories, perspectives or frameworks of relevance

    (LO5) Gain insightinto a range of government responses that have been developed to combat socialinequalities and related issues in the UK, at the regional and sub-regionallevel

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Lifelong learning skills

    (S5) Ethical awareness

    (S6) Problem solving skills

  • Social Justice in A Post-secular Age (IRIS335)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To provide students with an understanding of both secular and religious concepts of social justice;

    To investigate the role that social justice activism can play in society.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will acquire an understanding of the nature of social justice, both in secular and religious contexts.

    Students will be able to determine its relevance both politically and socially, make comparisons between the different forms of work and understand the key debates in the field.

    ​Through their seminar presentations and written work, students will develop analytical and research skills by using a wide range of source material, such as government and NGO reports as well as the academic literature.

    ​The seminars will encourage students to debate the merits of sources and present arguments concisely.

  • Teaching Geography (ENVS308)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide key transferable skills including: communication; presentation; practical classroom skills and team working;
    Provide teaching experience for undergraduates who are considering teaching as a potential career;
    Encourage a new generation of geography teachers;
    Provide role models for pupils within schools located in areas of high deprivation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the UK educational system and relevant teaching and learning styles

    (LO2) An understanding of Geography learning activites that link to the National Curriculum

    (LO3) The ability to mentor A-level Geography students

    (LO4) The ability to deliver and reflect on a learnnig activity targetted at secondary school pupils

    (LO5) Understanding of the relevant protocols and safeguarding practice relevant to working with school children

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

To help you meet the intellectual and practical challenges of studying Geography, our programmes are taught using a student centred approach, involving a range of learning experiences. These include:

  • Small tutor groups (typically eight students) through all years
  • High levels of field-based learning within the UK and abroad
  • An emphasis on active, problem-based learning (‘learning by doing’)
  • Hands-on experience of cutting-edge laboratory technologies in physical geography
  • Innovative GIS, statistical and qualitative research methodologies and community consultation in human geography
  • Supervised independent and group project work, including (for Single Honours degrees) a final year independent research-based dissertation supervised by a dedicated expert in the field.

A number of the School’s degree programmes involve laboratory and fieldwork. The fieldwork is carried out in various locations, ranging from inner city to coastal and mountainous environments. We consider applications from prospective students with disabilities on the same basis as all other students, and reasonable adjustments will be considered to address barriers to access.


Assessment

Assessments are designed around developing skills and styles of communication that will be relevant to future employers. So, in addition to exams and essays, you will also undertake assessments that include computer-based exercises, oral presentations, policy briefs, field projects, and research reports. Single Honours Geography students complete a compulsory 10,000-word dissertation in their final year on a topic of their choice. This is your opportunity to develop skills as an independent academic researcher, supported on a one-to-one basis by an expert in the field.