Game Design BA (Hons)

Key information


Two students looking at a computer, editing content.

Module details

Programme Year One

Your first year of study will be made up of compulsory modules, establishing the foundational principles and skills required for the rest of your studies; and one option.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Creative Principles in Game Design (SOTA103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide a conceptual basis for practical game design. To gain a better understanding of how existing games are crafted. To cultivate a stable workflow in the design of games. To develop the ability to articulate ideas about game design.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will describe the fundamental principles of game design, particularly in the digital medium.

    (LO2) Students will explain how games from different eras have implemented game design principles.

    (LO3) Students will apply fundamental principles in the production of original game designs.

    (LO4) Students will clearly articulate design ideas to others.

    (S1) Research.

    (S2) Critical thinking.

    (S3) Comprehension.

    (S4) Creativity and adaptability.

    (S5) Time and project management; organization skills.

    (S6) Communication (oral, written, visual).

    (S7) Writing.

    (S8) IT/technical skills.

  • Data Structures and Algorithms (COMP108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To introduce the notation, terminology, and techniques underpinning the study of algorithms.
    To introduce basic data structures and associated algorithms.
    To introduce standard algorithmic design paradigms and efficient use of data structures employed in the development of efficient algorithmic solutions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to describe the principles of and apply a variety of data structures and their associated algorithms;

    (LO2) Be able to describe standard algorithms, apply a given pseudo code algorithm in order to solve a given problem, and carry out simple asymptotic analyses of algorithms;

    (LO3) Be able to describe and apply different algorithm design principles and distinguish the differences between these principles;

    (LO4) Be able to choose and justify the use of appropriate data structures to enable efficient implementation of algorithms;

    (S1) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

    (S2) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem-solving

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving - Critical analysis

  • Games and Meaning (SOTA102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the concept of the holistic close reading and its history and importance for Arts scholarship. To enable students to develop skills in making meaning from specific aspects of game design. To develop students' ability to communicate about what game design can achieve. To demonstrate the importance of meaning in game design, and show how meaning is the product not only of intent but also social, economic and cultural conditions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to describe how meaning is made from specific individual features of video games and their relationships to one another.

    (LO2) Students should be able to produce coherent readings of disparate features of a video game and analyse their roles in sustaining theme and tone.

    (LO3) Students should be able to discuss the nature and aims of close reading, including issues of author intent, textuality and player experience, and their place within the study of art.

    (LO4) Students should be able to read and make meaning from five core areas of game design: camerawork, iconography, environmental design, difficulty and industrial context.

    (LO5) Students should be able to describe in-game events clearly to audiences unfamiliar with the game in question, and relate these to their industrial, economic and cultural contexts.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify unifying themes in extended works of art.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and reflect critically upon them.

    (S4) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S5) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to use and reference academic sources, and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S6) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skills in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S7) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S9) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, including online sources, video and screen capture and editing, and visual presentation aids.

  • Introduction to Game Design Studies (SOTA101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To introduce students to the study of games from a variety of academic perspectives. 2. To introduce students to the specificity of video games as a particular media text, media audience, and media industry. 3. To encourage students to widen their knowledge of media forms and industries through video game culture and the contexts in which we make sense of them. 4. To introduce students to key concepts, theories, and debates related to the study of video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to describe key concepts and theories related to the study of video games.

    (LO2) Students will be able to explain the different aesthetic, social, political and industrial contexts of video games.

    (LO3) Students will be able to report on key aspects and institutions of the video game industry.

    (LO4) Students will be able to identify features of a game's design that are particularly relevant to or revealing of its context as media object.

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) International awareness

  • Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (COMP111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to AI through studying search problems, reasoning under uncertainty, knowledge representation, planning, and learning in intelligent systems.
    To equip the students with an awareness of the main applications of AI and the history, philosophy, and ethics of AI.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to identify and describe the characteristics of intelligent agents and the environments that they can inhabit.

    (LO2) Students should be able to identify, contrast and apply to simple examples the basic search techniques that have been developed for problem-solving in AI.

    (LO3) Students should be able to apply to simple examples the basic notions of probability theory that have been applied to reasoning under uncertainty in AI.

    (LO4) Students should be able to identify and describe logical agents and the role of knowledge bases and logical inference in AI.

    (LO5) Students should be able to identify and describe some approaches to learning in AI and apply these to simple examples.

    (S1) Problem-solving / critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning.

  • Object-oriented Programming (COMP122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop understanding of object-oriented software methodology, in theory and practice.
    To further develop sound principles in software design and software development.
    To understand basic concepts of software testing principles and software version control systems. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe object hierarchy structure and how to design such a hierarchy of related classes.

    (LO2) Describe the concept of object polymorphism in theory and demonstrate this concept in practice.

    (LO3) Design and code iterators for collection-based data management.

    (LO4) Design simple unit tests using appropriate software tools.

    (LO5) Demonstrate concepts of event-driven programming and be able to design simple GUI to demonstrate this understanding.

    (LO6) Identify and describe the task and issues involved in the process of developing interactive products for people, and the techniques used to perform these tasks.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report Writing

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

  • Spatial Design in Games (SOTA104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the tools used in spatial design for games, including graphic and modeling software and game engines. To gain a critical awareness of how virtual space is used and controlled in various types of existing games. To foster creativity and innovation in spatial design.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the basic principles that underlie the design of space in video games.

    (LO2) Use graphics and 3D modeling software at a basic level of proficiency.

    (LO3) Critically analyse the use of space in existing games.

    (LO4) Express spatial design ideas verbally and graphically.

    (S1) Critical thinking.

    (S2) Comprehension.

    (S3) Creativity and adaptability.

    (S4) Time and project management; organization skills.

    (S5) Communication (oral, written, visual).

    (S6) Writing.

    (S7) IT/technical skills.

Year One Optional Modules

  • Introduction to Programming (COMP101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce concepts and principles of problem solving by computer, and the construction of appropriate algorithms for the solution of problems. To demonstrate the principles underlying the design of high level programming languages. To give students experience and confidence in the use of a high level programming language to implement algorithms.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to implement, compile, test and run Java programmes, comprising more than one class, to address a particular software problem.

    (LO2) Understand how to include arithmetic operators and constants in a Java program.

    (LO3) Be able to make use of members of classes found in the Java API (such as the Math class).

    (LO4) Demonstrate the ability to employ various types of selection constructs in a Java program.

    (LO5) Demonstrate the ability to employ repetition constructs in a Java program.

    (LO6) Be able to employ a hierarchy of Java classes to provide a solution to a given set of requirements.

    (LO7) Demonstrate the ability to use simple data structures like arrays in a Java program.

    (LO8) Specific learning outcomes are listed above.General learning outcomes: An understanding of the principles and practice of object oriented analysis and design in the construction of robust, maintainable programs which satisfy their requirements; A competence to design, write, compile, test and execute straightforward programs using a high level language; An appreciate of the principles of object oriented programming; An awareness of the need for a professional approach to design and the importance of good documentation to the finished programs.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

  • Programming Language Paradigms (COMP105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:105
    Aims

    To introduce the functional programming paradigm, and to compare and contrastit with the imperative programming paradigm.
    To explore the common techniques that are employed to solve problems in a functional way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Describe the imperative and functional programming paradigms including the differences between them.

    (LO2) Apply recursion to solve algorithmic tasks.

    (LO3) Apply common functional programming idioms such as map, filter and fold.

    (LO4) Write programs using a functional programming language.

    (S1) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

Programme Year Two

Alongside compulsory modules – which include an independent project – you’ll choose two modules from a range of options.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Computer Networks (COMP211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    1. To introduce networked computer systems in general, and the Internet in particular.
    2. To introduce the basic principles that govern their operation.
    3. To introduce the design and organisation principles of successful computer networks.
    4. To introduce the key protocols and technologies that are used in the Internet.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to describe and justify the OSI Reference Model and the key protocols that govern the Internet.

    (LO2) Students should be able to program applications and protocols for computer networks.

    (LO3) Students should be able to illustrate and debate the use and need of cryptographic techniques in nework security.

    (S1) Problem Solving - Numeracy and computational skills

    (S2) Problem solving – analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Different Play (SOTA202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the work of key queer theorists concerning games. To develop students' understandings of the ways in which games, rule sets and digital systems relate and contribute to broader culture. To broaden students' ideas of the kind of games it is possible to make. T o support students' ability to create work that challenges discrimination and marginalisation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to explain the relationship between queerness and play.

    (LO2) Students should be able to identify the key themes of queer theory relating to games, including representation, community, failure, appropriation and power.

    (LO3) Students should be able to analyse game design tropes and clichés and their role in reinforcing cultural norms.

    (LO4) Students should be able to relate their own creative ideas to social norms and expectations.

    (LO5) Students should be emboldened to challenge repressive and oppressive systems through the design of play experiences.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically about societal assumptions and unspoken conventions.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to present theoretical material through creative and descriptive expression.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to concisely convey the relevant details of a project or proposal.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to take seriously the views of others of different and marginalised identities.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to recognise and understand the implicit meanings of cultural artefacts and media.

    (S7) Students will learn to contextualise artistic features within aesthetic and cultural theory.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to identify and isolate relevant details of complex media works.

  • Game Design Independent Project (SOTA205)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To begin to develop a portfolio of work in the chosen pathway.
    To hone practical skills in a specific area of game content creation.
    To develop creativity and a sense of self-reliance.
    To gain experience generating an effective project proposal.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate pathway-specific skills

    (LO2) Organise and implement design projects in an individual context

    (LO3) Produce work suitable for inclusion with a professional portfolio

    (S1) Time and project management; organization skills

    (S2) Communication (written, verbal, narrative/visual/musical/interactive)

    (S3) Creativity and adaptability

    (S4) IT/technical skills

    (S5) Writing

    (S6) Critical thinking

  • Principles of Computer Games Design and Implementation (COMP222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    1. To introduce the main issues surrounding the computer games architecture.
    2. To introduce the fundamental concepts underpinning computer games development (game physics, game artificial intelligence, content generation).
    3. To provide practical experience of software engineering associated with computer games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of different design issues related to computer games development: game structure, game engine, physics engine;

    (LO2) Have an appreciation of the fundamental concepts associated with game development: game physics, game artificial intelligence, content generation;

    (LO3) Have the ability to implement a simple game using an existing game engine.

    (S1) Problem solving

    (S2) Application of numeracy

    (S3) Application of information technology tools

  • Software Engineering I (COMP201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The module is intended to develop an understanding of the problems associated with the development of significant computing systems (that is, systems that are too large to be designed and developed by a single person, and are designed to be used by many users) and to appreciate the techniques and tools necessary to develop such systems efficiently, in a cost-effective manner.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Realise the problems in designing and building significant computer systems;

    (LO2) Understand the need to design systems that fully meet the requirements of the intended users including functional and non functional elements;

    (LO3) Appreciate the need to ensure that the implementation of a design is adequately tested to ensure that the completed system meets the specifications;

    (LO4) Be fully aware of the principles and practice of an O-O approach to the design and development of computer systems;

    (LO5) Be able to apply these principles in practice;

    (LO6) Produce O-O requirements and design documentation in UML which demonstrates the features of good design such as loose coupling and high cohesion;

    (LO7) Be able to demonstrate how to effectively  implent an O-O design in an O-O languuge such as Java or Python;

    (S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S2) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal action planning

Year Two Optional Modules

  • 3d Modelling and Animation for Games (SOTA203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop and refine techniques and methods of 3D asset creation. To gain greater fluency with standard tools used in 3D asset creation, including modeling software and game engines. To learn how to effectively animate figures in order to convey information meaningfully. To generate work for a creative portfolio that may be used in a professional context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate technical proficiency with 3D modeling software.

    (LO2) Implement dynamic objects in a game engine.

    (LO3) Properly animate figures in order to suit the goal or context of a game scene or setting.

    (LO4) Describe contemporary methods for 3d asset creation and animation.

    (S1) IT/technical skills.

    (S2) Comprehension.

    (S3) Communication (verbal, written, visual/interactive).

    (S4) Time and project management; organization skills.

    (S5) Critical thinking.

    (S6) Writing.

    (S7) Creativity and adaptability.

  • Composition for Digital Games (MUSI305)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide a conceptual and theoretical basis for composing game music. To provide an overview of the function of music in video games, including within different genres and game states. To introduce the fundamentals of middleware and game engines relevant to composing for videogames. To introduce techniques appropriate to composing for video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand the role of music in videogame and the design concepts specific to this medium.

    (LO2) To understand and implement basic techniques relevant to videogame composition (e.g. looping, transitions, cues, stingers).

    (LO3) To understand the principles and function of middleware engines and game integration.

    (LO4) To be able to compose short pieces of music appropriate to particular videogame genres or game-states.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Adaptability

    (S5) Time and project management; organization skills.

  • Games Playing Roles (ENGL397)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will introduce students to the ways in which literature reflects trends in gaming and gamification, and the ways in which authors have used “games”, understood either as literary experiments or as imagined games, within their works. The format of the module (weekly seminars on texts, interspersed with workshops in which students will work in groups to compare and evaluate different approaches to the completion of individual module assessments) are intended to develop the ability to work independently, but also enhance students’ ability to discuss, evaluate, and implement ideas as a group. Moreover, as it forms part of both the literary studies and gaming studies programmes, it will enable students from different disciplinary backgrounds to engage with each other and encourage peer-to-peer learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of the module, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which games relate to contemporary literature at the level of form, structure, and content.

    (LO2) On completion of the module, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the ways in which literary texts can engage with specific aesthetic, cultural, and historical contexts.

    (LO3) On completion of the module, students will have an insight into the similarities and differences between literary and ludic forms.

    (LO4) On completion of the module, students will be able to plan, research, and execute an assignment that demonstrates the above, alongside analytical skills and the ability to deploy appropriate terminology.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S6) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S7) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S9) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S10) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S11) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • Immersive Media and VIrtual Worlds B (COMM211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the histories of immersive media and virtual world forms To introduce students to theories and conceptual approaches to immersion, digital realism, cognition and simulation. To encourage students to develop advanced textual analysis skills in relation to virtual images. To en courage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of the industry contexts in which immersive experience and virtual worlds are produced and consumed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the histories and theories of immersive experiences and virtual realities and worlds.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the capacity to develop critical insight and textual analysis skills of virtual reality texts.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate and accurate terminology and concepts when explaining immersive and virtual reality technologies.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industrial and entertainment contexts around, and uses of, immersive experiences and virtual realities.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Commercial awareness.

    (S3) Organisational skills.

    (S4) Communication skills.

    (S5) International awareness.

  • Music in Gaming (MUSI273)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an overview of technological development and a basic (non-technical) appreciation of how sound and music are generated via gaming software/hardware; and to understand the role of the former in determining compositional design across different 'generations' of gaming hardware.

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between music and gaming contexts (eg genre, narrative function, immersion, emotion, and character portrayal).

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between game-music and other forms of music (eg orchestral styles, film music, popular music in compiled tracks).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of gaming hardware/software and the extent to which this determines, by limiting or affording, the incorporation of sound/music.

    (LO2) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between music in gaming and other gameplay factors (such as narrative, immersion, game-cues).

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate an awareness of broader critical, cultural, and ludomusicological issues, as presented and discussed in both historical and contemporary scholarship.

    (LO4) Students will be able to be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study examples.

    (S1) Communication skills.

    (S2) Research skills.

    (S3) Comprehension.

    (S4) Critical thinking.

    (S5) Writing skills.

    (S6) Applied skills.

    (S7) IT skills.

  • Talking Pictures: Comics and Pictorial Narrative (ENGL362)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of a range of texts within the tradition of comics, pictorial narrative and graphic literature.

    To develop a sense of the possible relationships between visual and verbal exposition and narrative form.

    To develop an understanding of the cultural, intellectual and historical contexts of comics and graphic literature.

    To develop an understanding of the cultural, intellectual and historical contexts of comics and graphic literature.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An enhanced sense of the range of the expressive possibilities of grahpic literature.

    (LO2) An understanding of various literary and artistic techniques.

    (LO3) Enhanced reading skills in relation to verbal and visual modes of narrative, and the relationships between the two.     

    (LO4) An enhanced knowledge and understanding of the cultural and historical contexts in which graphic literature developed.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S7) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

Programme Year Three

Alongside compulsory modules, you’ll undertake a major collaborative project.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • App Development (COMP228)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To provide guidelines, design principles and experience in developing applications for small, mobile devices, including an appreciation of context and location aware services.  To develop an appreciation of interaction modalities with small, mobile devices through the implementation of simple applications and use cases. To be aware of current developments of mobile interface technologies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module, the student will have a working understanding of the characteristics and limitations of mobile hardware devices including their user-interface modalities.

    (LO2) The ability to develop applications that are mobile-device specific and demonstrate current practice in mobile computing contexts.

    (LO3) A comprehension and appreciation of the design and development of context-aware solutions for mobile devices. 

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial awareness

  • Game Design Collaborative Project A (SOTA304)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To generate a substantial body of work that can serve as a professional portfolio.
    To hone practical skills in a specific area of game content creation.
    To gain experience working in teams and applying skills in this context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an ability to work and communicate in a team-based context

    (LO2) Demonstrate technical proficiency with tools in their chosen pathway

    (LO3) Articulate their work clearly and in a compelling manner

    (S1) Time and project management; organisation skills

    (S2) Communication (written, verbal, narrative/visual/musical/interactive)

    (S3) Creativity and adaptability

    (S4) IT/technical skills

    (S5) Writing

    (S6) Critical Thinking

  • Game Design Collaborative Project B (SOTA305)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To generate a substantial body of work that can serve as a professional portfolio.
    To hone practical skills in a specific area of game content creation.
    To gain experience working in teams and applying skills in this context.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Produce work that is viable for use in a professional portfolio.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to work and communicate in a team-based context.

    (LO3) Demonstrate technical proficiency with tools in their chosen pathway.

    (LO4) Articulate their work clearly and in a compelling manner.

    (S1) Time and project management; organization skills.

    (S2) Communication (written, verbal, narrative/visual/musical/interactive).

    (S3) Creativity and adaptability.

    (S4) IT/technical skills.

    (S5) Writing.

    (S6) Critical Thinking.

  • Games and Algorithmic Culture (COMM309)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - Investigate how videogames are responding and contributing to the current technological and cultural changes in the use of AI, data mining, procedurally generated content, metrics and automation.

    - Provide a fundamental knowledge of the videogame industry, the contemporary trends of digital entertainment, and new techniques of game development and distribution.

    - Understand videogames in relation to the history of computing and cybernetics, and through theories of governmentality, posthumanism, and procedural rhetoric.

    - Understand how the medium of the videogame is entangled with the technical, aesthetic, social and economic changes brought by contemporary digital culture.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to critically analyse how the use of AI, data mining, procedurally generated content, metrics and automation is changing our lives and culture, including our contemporary forms of entertainment.

    (LO2) Students will understand and critically analyse the key trends of the videogame industry through documents and reports produced by academic research and industry representatives.

    (LO3) Students will understand and critically analyse how theories of cybernetics, computing, governmentality, procedural rhetoric and posthumanism emerge through contemporary forms of digital play.

    (LO4) Students will identify areas of intervention and of critical analysis through original and independent research.

    (S1) Analysis of academic texts and industry documents

    (S2) Critical skills

    (S3) Analysis of case studies

  • Philosophy of Play and the VIrtual (PHIL343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the main contemporary issues around play and games. To develop students understanding of the relationships between play, labour and virtuality. To enable students to reflect on their own preconceptions of play and value.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain the importance of play as a topic for study.

    (LO2) Students will be able to analyse common topics of discourse around play and games, especially digital games: violence, addiction, therapeutic and educational effects, and gamification.

    (LO3) Students will be able to identify philosophical issues arising from specific games/instances of play.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain some of the philosophical literature around play, make-believe, choice and responsibility, and virtual worlds.

    (LO5) Students will be able to trace connections between surface controversies and deeper philosophical concerns.

    (LO6) Students will develop their ability to reflect on their own preconceptions and how these contribute to both philosophical and popular discourse.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify unifying philosophical issues in everyday discussions and mass-media environments.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to identify their own presumptions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, use and reference academic sources, and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S7) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S10) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, including online sources, video and screen capture and editing, and visual presentation aids.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Contact time generally consists of lectures, in which students are presented with core content, and seminars/labs/workshops, in which students discuss lecture topics, readings and work in groups to complete exercises. The practical modules from within the School of the Arts follow a more interactive model of seminar/workshop. These modules stress short practical lessons and exercises in seminars while allowing students to have supervised time to work independently in workshops.


Assessment

Assessments include a variety of written components (essays, case studies, creative responses, adaptation exercises, etc.) Inspired by the principles of the TESTA (Transforming the Experience of Students Through Assessment) programme, assessments also include both formative and summative coursework. Modules are largely designed to emphasise practical development by means of interactive workshops, small-group work, and individual tutorial sessions with instructors.