Film Studies with International Politics and Policy BA (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: T378
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 with no score less than 4. /
Modern-Languages-and-Cultures-4

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Approaches to Film (FILM102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key theoretical and conceptual debates within Film Studies;

    To develop students' ability to apply theoretical and conceptual debates to close readings of film texts;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Show an awareness of the key theoretical and conceptual debates within Film Studies

    (LO2) Understand film within its broader historical, cultural and social context

    (LO3) Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of a film

    (LO4) Successfully apply a close reading to films across a range of different national and industrial contexts

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S4) Personal attributes and qualities – Independence

  • Film Cultures (FILM104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To understand different sites of film exhibition, for example: Festivals, streaming platforms, made for internet videos, television films / miniseries;

    To analyse digital and physical sites of distribution in relation to the genres and types of films exhibited;

    To analyse film as a global medium;

    To understand the cultural contexts within which these films circulate and the ways in which they create cultural meanings;

    To address and interrogate concepts of taste in the ways in which films circulate and are granted space in media beyond the screen;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand different sites of film exhibition for example festivals, streaming platforms, made for internet videos. Television films / miniseries.

    (LO2) Understand film as a global medium.

    (LO3) Evaluate the cultural contexts within which these films circulate and the ways in which they create cultural meanings.

    (LO4) To address and interrogate concepts of taste in the ways in which films circulate and are granted space in media beyond the screen.

    (S1) Critical analysis and independent thinking.

    (S2) Global citizenship and cultural awareness.

    (S3) Communication: oral, written visual to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.

  • Foundations in International Politics (POLI104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The principal objective of this module is to provide introductory foundations to the study of international politics by introducing the main theories and approaches;

    To provide an overview of the major developments of international politics since the 20th century, paying particular attention to the Cold War and its aftermath;

    To offer brief introductions to four main issues of international politics: globalisation, Europeanisation and regional integration, environmentalism and poverty and development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the main theories of international relations (IR) and a greater awareness of their applicability in analysing specific issues in international politics. Of equal importance, students should have acquired a familiarity with the main themes that characterise both the Cold War and the post Cold War period. More specifically, students will have acquired the following: An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the major IR theories.  

    (LO2) Students should have developed the ability to compare and contrast the various theories when discussing questions and issues affecting international politics.

    (LO3) Students will be familiar with the main events, issues and themes in international relations.

    (S1) Students will be able to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of knowledge and information.

    (S2) Students will be able to demonstrate that they are able to write arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (S3) Students will acquire the ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

  • Foundations in Politics (POLI109)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    Students will demonstrate a foundational understanding of key political concepts;  

    Students will examine democratic theory and its challenges;

    Students will analyse expressions of political power;

    Students will demonstrate a knowledge of major political theories and arguments of key political scientists, political sociologists, and political philosophers;

    Students will understand what the study of politics is, and they will be able to distinguish the different ways in which one can study politics (empirical and normative approaches);

    To give students the skills necessary to master their degree in politics and to maximise their grade potential within the Department of Politics;

    To ensure students develop the skills necessary to be active rather than passive learners;

    To enable students to link study skills and research methods with their own academic success on the modules available in the first year and beyond.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of politics and the study of politics.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to relate political theory to the real world application of political power.

    (LO3) Identify the problems faced by democratic and non-democratic political systems and the means by which they can be understood.

    (LO4) Deconstruct the relationship between power, the state, democratic theory and the application of political authority.

    (LO5) Students will develop academic writing, communication, and presentation skills.

    (LO6) Students will develop exam skills and skills to reflect on critical feedback.

    (LO7) Students will develop an understanding of using sources and acquire referencing skills and awareness of plagiarism

    (S1) Enhanced research skills.

    (S2) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

  • Introduction to Film Language (FILM101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the ways in which a film creates meaning, and to provide students with the ability to identify and explain the techniques used by a film-maker and the results obtained;

    To foster a capacity for precise and sophisticated observation, and for intelligent structured discussion of what is observed;

    To develop confidence and intellectual depth in discussion, ability to present information succinctly both orally and in writing;

    To develop students’ knowledge of the formal and technical language of film analysis.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have a working knowledge of thetechnical vocabulary of cinema and be able to produce precise description of the construction of a piece of audiovisual material.

    (LO2) Critically analyse audio visual material in terms of its mise-en-scène, camera-work, editing and soundtechnique, and to indicate how these elements contribute to the understanding of the whole.

    (LO3) Observe and comment on the ways in which these elements may inflect the explicit meaning of the text.

    (LO4) Understand and discuss different techniques of film narrative.

    (LO5) Write in a clear and well-informed way on the construction and meaning of film.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S7) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S8) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S9) Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of a film

  • Introduction to Film Research (FILM106)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To broaden anddeepen students ’ understanding of film texts in context; To develop students' critical skills when confronted with academic writing; To increase students' confidence in handling theoretical concepts in relation to specific texts; To introducestudents to techniques of independent research, including question formulation,data-gathering, project organisation and time management.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the study skills needed for an independently researched project.

    (LO2) Ability to organise a project into appropriate chapters and stages etc.

    (LO3) Ability to recognise and develop research worthy ideas and to explain their interest convincingly.

    (LO4) Ability to manage working time effectively and to take responsibility for regular tasks.

    (LO5) A deeper understanding of the concepts taught in other modules (especially FILM102) and an ability to use them to underpin independent research.

    (S1) Information skills - critical reading

    (S2) Information skills - Information accessing

    (S3) Communication skills - Media analysis

    (S4) Communication skills - Academic writing

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S6) Research skills - all communication skills

  • Introduction to Sound and Music in Audiovisual Media (MUSI170)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To explore music's relationship with film and establish the soundtrack's central role in our interpretation of key elements of this artistic medium.
    To investigate the practicalities of film music composition.
    To engage theoretically with audio-visual modes of discourse.
    To use key theories and ideologies within the field of film music scholarship as a basis for the critical analysis of film sound and music.
    To set a fundamental understanding of the film soundtrack that allows for the further investigation of other components within audio-visual media (such as television, music videos, youtube, videogames).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to read and discuss key texts in a critical and comparative manner

    (LO2) The ability to apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of music in audio-visual media

    (LO3) The ability to discuss, together, music/sound, image, and narrative

    (LO4) The ability to utilise appropriate theoretical frameworks in the critical analysis of audio-visual media

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • Sound, Image and Meaning (COMM152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a foundational understanding of: Notions of influence within work in Communication Studies The role of sound and visuals in signifying meaning in media texts How meaning and influence have been researched, and the difficulties involved in designing successful research in these areas In helping students to develop these types of knowledge and understanding, it seeks to provide skills that can be drawn on in subsequent modules that involve formal analysis of media texts and work on media content and institutional organisation more broadly.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to develop a critical understanding of the role of reader interpretation in helping to determine the meaning of media texts and in guiding responses to them.

    (LO2) Students will be a ble to learn to analyse the ways in which different components of media texts are organised to signify meanings.

    (LO3) Students will be able to gain an introductory understanding of the ways in which meaning and influence have been conceptualised and researched.

    (LO4) Students will be able to practise and develop an ability to apply research, understanding and analysis in seminar and group discussion and in producing coursework.

    (S1) Literacy: application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

Year Two Optional Modules

  • The Cinematic City (FILM201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To explore ways in which European cinema has made use of the urban space (cinema having been described as an urban art-form par excellence ); Through a wide range of films from different European countries, to introduce students both to issues relating to the imaginary conception of cities, and to concepts in film theory regarding the construction of space, the position of the observer, and the nature and purpose of representation and of narrative construction;

    To introduce students to relatively complex theoretical constructions, in an immediate and approachable way, which will give them confidence in their ability to handle concepts in critical theory and to apply them successfully;

    To develop their capacities in expressing their ideas, both in discussion and in written work, with regard to more advanced material than they were required to study in the first-year module;

    To alert them to the conceptual links which film studies has with other theoretical fields; To introduce students in a simple way to the practical problems of audiovisual representation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Awareness of issues of urban theory, of the spatial implications of cinematic expression, and of the interaction of these;

    (LO2) Awareness of the ways in which cinema has been used to articulate the self-construction of urban societies

    (LO3) Alertness to the ways in which the modern world is constructed through representations

    (LO4) Ability to handle theoretical concepts confidently in written and oral modes, to carry on a discussion and sustain an argument by applying those concepts.

    (LO5) Awareness of some of the practical issues involved in creating an audiovisual piece.

    (LO6) Ability to plan the translation of experience of the city into audiovisual form.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S6) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S7) Handling audiovisual material

  • Propaganda and Censorship (FILM202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an insight into the interaction of film and political authority, the structures which the authorities use or have used in order to exert control on the cinema and the ways in which cinema’s power over its audience has been harnessed, manipulated or occasionally feared to the point of suppression;

    To examine specific films, scenes from them and the controversies around them as case studies of the interaction of film and political and /or other authority;

    To introduce students to theoretical debates about propaganda and censorship in Film Studies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a differentiated understanding of the way in which political and other authorities have sought to control, harness and curb the power of film in different historical situations.

    (LO2) Students will gain an awareness of film’s position in national institutional structures and the effect of these onthe finished product and a historical perspective on the perceived purpose of and limits on film production in Europe.

    (LO3) Students will develop an alertness to the ways in which film may seek to manipulate the viewer and a critical attitude to the theories that have been constructed regarding the effects of film on its audience.

    (LO4) Students will develop an ability to use different kinds of textual evidence to present a balanced and sophisticated argument about complex issues of representation and control and to reach a reasoned conclusion recognising the power of social attitudes and desires in the formulation and conduct of debates in these fields.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Research skills - All Information skills

  • The Italian Cinema (ITAL223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To introduce students to the major periods and some of the major films of one of the most significant of European National cinemas, through a selection of films which are available in sub-titled versions in this country;

    To give students an understanding of the range of Italian cinema, its influence on Europe as a whole, and its very particular nature (with a particular consideration to the strong division between the internationally influential ‘art-film’ production of the 1950s and 1960s, and the generic popular films which brought in the domestic audience and have recently begun to attract notice abroad);

    To broaden students’ perceptions of ‘European’ cinema, to give them a basis for comparison which they can use in their other modules on this course;

    To increase students’ analytical tools and vocabulary with respect to different types of cultural production;

    To increase students’ awareness of the social function of film (and cultural production in general) and the role it plays both for its audience and (to some extent) in the intellectual life of a culture in general;

    To make students aware of possible aspects of film culture which they may wish to explore further in their final year or during their year in Europe;

    To increase students’ confidence in written and oral analysis and debate.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A broad knowledge of the history of Italian cinema so that students will be able both to compare it with other European cinemas and to assess current Italian films and issues in Italian cinema in a historical context.

    (LO2) An awareness of the different roles and functions of ‘auteur’ and popular cinema, of the issues for film studies which these different types of production imply, and of some possibly fruitful avenues for further study.

    (LO3) An ability to discuss both orally and in written form concepts relating both to formal innovation (where authorial intent must be taken into account) and to generic norms and issues of spectatorship (applying theoretical concepts to popular cultural forms)

    (LO4) Confidence in dealing with film texts where (it must be assumed) the principal language is not one they are familiar with, and an ability to make allowances for this and to come to the appropriate terms with their own position in relation to the culture they are studying.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - Independence

    (S7) Research skills - independent analysis

  • Introduction to French Cinema (FREN236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the basic language of film analysis; To introduce students to the rich cultural field which the cinema has represented in France through study of selected films from particularly significant periods, giving them a background of reference points and an understanding of how cinema has developed in France; To cultivate habits of close visual analysis and careful structuring of such analysis ; To increase confidence in class discussion and presentation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to give an intelligent and informed account of how any film (from whatever culture) is put together, the ways in which it engages its audience and the messages it conveys.

    (LO2) Students will develop thorough and perceptive powers of observation and interpretation of the elements of a cinematic text both visual and aural

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain their observations in a structured way, in written analyses and also orally in front of a class, in the latter case using visual aids when appropriate.

    (LO4) Students will be able to insert their detailed observations into a thematic or historical context in order to show how a particular film deals with larger issues, and to construct a well-written essay to explain their ideas.

    (LO5) Students should have a basic overview of major directors and trends in the history of the cinema in France, which will enable them to see other French films in their historical and artistic context.

    (S1) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the cultures, linguistic contexts, history, politics, geography, and social and economic structures of the societies of the country of the target language

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Successfully apply a close reading to a text of the target language

    (S7) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

    (S10) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

  • Spanish and Latin American Cinemas: An Introduction (HISP229)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the cinematic dimension of Spanish and Latin American cultures;

    To create an awareness of the economic forces which frame the film industry in Spain and Latin America in specific areas of contemporary political and cultural life;

    To develop students' skills in close textual analysis of a range of film texts;  

    To explore the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts within Spain and Latin America.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge of the cinematic practices and cultures of Spain and Latin America.

    (LO2) Show an understanding of the ways in which Spanish and Latin American film are shaped by wider economic and cultural forces.

    (LO3) Show an ability to apply close readings to film texts

    (LO4) Display an understanding of the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts with Spain and Latin America.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • German Cinema From the Expressionism to the Present (GRMN225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the history of German national cinema from its origins to the present day with a special focus on Weimar Cinema, the Third Reich, post-war film, the New German Cinema of the 1960s and 1970s; To introduce students to the work of key German directors including F. W. Murnau, Fritz Lang, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog and Wim Wender; To sensitise students to films as historical texts which emerge from and engage with the context of their production; To sensitise students to film as an aesthetic artefact determined on the one hand by particular conditions of production (i.e. the studio system/‘Autorenkino’) and produced on the other according to cinematic conventions of film language, genre etc.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the emergence and development of German national cinema from its origins until the present.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate a critical awareness of academic debates about major periods or movements in German film – Weimar film and ‘Expressionism’, the Third Reich, post-war cinema, the New German Cinema and post-unification cinema – and of current academic debates about them.

    (LO3) Students will develop critical and analytical skills enabling them to evaluate a variety of film materials from a range of different periods and styles.

    (LO4) Students will be able to evaluate a range of other varieties of textual and historical evidence, to assess its relative merits and to construct in verbal and written form clearly reasoned arguments on the basis of such evidence.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Immersive Media and VIrtual Worlds B (COMM211)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the histories of immersive media and virtual world forms To introduce students to theories and conceptual approaches to immersion, digital realism, cognition and simulation. To encourage students to develop advanced textual analysis skills in relation to virtual images. To en courage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of the industry contexts in which immersive experience and virtual worlds are produced and consumed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the histories and theories of immersive experiences and virtual realities and worlds.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the capacity to develop critical insight and textual analysis skills of virtual reality texts.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate and accurate terminology and concepts when explaining immersive and virtual reality technologies.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industrial and entertainment contexts around, and uses of, immersive experiences and virtual realities.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Commercial awareness.

    (S3) Organisational skills.

    (S4) Communication skills.

    (S5) International awareness.

  • Projecting China: An Introduction to Chinese Cinema (HIST277)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of contemporary Chinese cinema (principally produced in the People’s Republic of China), both in terms of itshistorical development and its recent spread around the world;

    To introduce a number of landmarks in the history of 20th century China, through their representations in filmic texts;

    To develop students’ abilities to present and organise arguments clearly, and to analyse problems, in relation to these issues;

    To enhance students’ skills in the critical evaluation of primary sources (specifically films) and historiography.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

    (LO2) An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

    (LO3) The ability to develop and sustainhistorical arguments and utilise evidence, with regard to the history andhistoriography of the development of Chinese cinema, as well as therepresentation of Chinese history in Chinese cinema.

    (S1) Confidence, independence of mind, responsibility, organisation and time-management.

    (S2) The ability to work collaboratively and to participate in group discussion

    (S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information, including online and digital resources.

    (S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression.

    (S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

  • India After Gandhi: Culture, Identity and the Nation (HIST231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to post-colonial Indian history;

    To introduce students to using films as historical sources;

    To encourage students to consider the role of culture in fashioning identities and about the nature and challenges of being ‘post-colonial’, as well as about the nature and effects of globalisation;

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.

    (LO2) An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

    (LO3) An ability to read, analyse and reflectcritically and contextually upon films as primary sources.

    (S1) Confidence, independence of mind, responsibility, organisation and time-management.

    (S2) The ability to work collaboratively and to participate in group discussion.

    (S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information, including online and digital resources.

    (S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression.

    (S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression.

  • Music in Gaming (MUSI273)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an overview of technological development and a basic (non-technical) appreciation of how sound and music are generated via gaming software/hardware; and to understand the role of the former in determining compositional design across different 'generations' of gaming hardware.

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between music and gaming contexts (eg genre, narrative function, immersion, emotion, and character portrayal).

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between game-music and other forms of music (eg orchestral styles, film music, popular music in compiled tracks).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of gaming hardware/software and the extent to which this determines, by limiting or affording, the incorporation of sound/music.

    (LO2) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between music in gaming and other gameplay factors (such as narrative, immersion, game-cues).

    (LO3) To demonstrate an awareness of broader critical, cultural, and ludomusicological issues, as presented and discussed in both historical and contemporary scholarship.

    (LO4) To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study examples.

    (S1) Communication skills.

    (S2) Research skills.

    (S3) Comprehension.

    (S4) Critical thinking.

    (S5) Writing skills.

    (S6) Applied skills.

    (S7) IT skills.

  • Global Hollywood B: From Film Art to Media Entertainment (COMM203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:
    To introduce students to the role played by the Hollywood film industry in the development of modern trans-national entertainment networks.
    To enable students to understand the relationship between film style (aesthetics) and structures of industrial organization at various points in Hollywood's history.
    To provide students with an understanding of the ways in which national / cultural identities in Hollywood films relate to changing industrial and social contexts of film production and consumption.
    To help students understand recent debates about media convergence and the globalisation of media entertainment.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be familiar with a number of terms and concepts used in film criticism and analysis.

    (LO2) Students will have developed an understanding of the role played by US films in mobilising social and cultural identities, especially around particular formations of nationality and gender.

    (LO3) Students will have the ability to identify the commercial imperatives of film and television texts.

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Commercial awareness

    (S5) Communication skills

  • Understanding Documentary (COMM282)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to introduce students to ideas about the form and function of documentary work as it has developed internationally since the 1920s in film and later television. Through lectures, screenings, reading and discussion, students will be encouraged to develop an analytical knowledge of:
    • The range of purposes claimed for documentary work.
    • Key forms and approaches employed at different moments in the history of documentary.
    • Relationships between documentary work and the 'real world' to which it refers.
    • Issues of 'truthfulness' and the ethics of documentary representations.
    • Documentary-makers' strategies to appeal to audiences or yield responses from them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrates a critical awareness of debates surrounding the representation of 'the real' in film and television texts.

    (LO2) Demonstrates familiarity with and understanding of the terms and concepts used in describing and evaluating documentary work in film and television.

    (LO3) Demonstrates familiarity with and understanding of key visual and verbal components of documentary organisation.

    (LO4) Demonstrates the ability to read and critically evaluate film and television texts based on real subjects.

    (S1) Proficient use of electronic resources and tools for research as specified and required.

    (S2) Time management, organisation of work, proficient use of English, referencing.

    (S3) Analysis of film and television texts; understanding and application of appropriate terminology and criteria.

    (S4) Understanding and analysis of ethical obligations of documentary film-makers.

  • Music in World Cinema (MUSI270)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To study the musical practices of film traditions outside the Anglophone world and their cultural contexts, with particular emphasis on comparisons to classical Hollywood practice - To build on knowledge acquired in first year modules on world music and music in audio-visual media - To develop students' abilty to think and write about music in audio-visual contexts

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to demonstrate familiarity with ideas about music and film in several other cultures.

    (LO2)  Ability to explain the relationship between theory and the cultural context in which it has arisen, as well as the challenges of applying theories to texts from cultures outside that context.

    (LO3) Ability to deploy comparative and cross-cultural perspectives in the understanding of the relationships between music and film as well as their cultural contexts

    (LO4) Higher level analytical and essay-writing skills, including Higher level analytical and essay-writing skills, including more advanced argumentation and handling difficult bibliographic challenges.

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

  • American Politics and Society (POLI205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To acquaint students with the US constitutional system;

    To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes;

    To help students explore how actors and institutions residing outside the state influence the governing processes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the Federal Government.

    (LO2) An understanding of how federal institutions interact with those residing at the state level (via the Federalist nature of the US Constitutional system) to shape the character of the US political system.

    (LO3) An understanding of the relationships between the branches of the federal government.

    (LO4) An understand of the power of the federal judiciary, particularly in relation to civil rights and civil liberties.

    (LO5) An understanding of how public opinion, political parties, and the media interact with governing institutions to shape the overall governing processes found in the United States.

    (LO6) Understand the role of the states in the electoral process.

    (LO7) Understand the role of the media in the electoral process.

    (LO8) To understand how contemporary policy reflects the interaction of politics, political institutions, and society.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Aspects of Media and Politics (POLI208)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    T o give students an appreciation of the relationship between the mass media, politicians and the public; To make students aware of the way the different aspects of the communication process act, react and interact, and with what political and social implications; To familiarise students with the manner in which the mass media respond to political pressure and spin, and with the way coverage affects those exposed to it; To explore the way the media contribute to (or compromise) democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to place the mass media's political role in theoretical, empirical, moral and legal context.

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate the role of economic pressure, public relations and political lobbying on the way journalists cover politics.

    (LO3) Students should have a grasp of how far the media trivialise politics, or inflects it in a biased fashion.

    (LO4) Students should be able to understand how, in a variety of contexts, the media relates to the health, or otherwise, of contemporary democracy.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

  • British Political Ideologies (POLI237)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To examine several theoretical issues relating to political ideologies in Britain. These include what meanings can be attached to the concept of ideology itself and the relationship between political debate and ideology; To examine the range of ideologies present within British politics, looking in particular at the differences between and within each ideology in historical and contemporary contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain an understanding of the nature of political ideologies.

    (LO2) Students will gain knowledge of the content of ideologies in Britain.

    (LO3) Students will be able to understand the nature of debates within British political ideologies.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Regimes and Their Consequences (POLI222)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Examine the reasons for state-building and their implications for contemporary political developments around the world;

    Analyse the establishment, durability and overthrow of authoritarian regimes using historical and contemporary case studies;

    Examine the process of democratization in countries transitioning from authoritarian regimes and the conditions determining its success or failure;

    Consider the issue of support for democracy in developed and developing countries and its potential decline;

    Explore the potential of social movements to effect change in a variety of different political regimes;

    Relate changes and developments in regional contexts to the theoretical literature on comparative politics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and describe the historical factors that have shaped political institutions and structures;

    (LO2) Describe the evolution of cultural norms, attitudes, ideologies and traditions that affect how politics is viewed and conducted;

    (LO3) Outline and be able to classify political forms, including the ways in which leaders are chosen and power is distributed and restrained;

    (LO4) Compare and contrast countries using comparative models, with regard to each of the above;

    (LO5) Apply differing models in political structures and policy approaches, and evaluate their effectiveness and usefulness

    (LO6) Evaluate one’s own political system, its strengths and its weaknesses, by comparing it to others.

    (S1) Ability to work autonomously and demonstrate initiative, organisation and effective time management

    (S2) Ability to work with others and explore different viewpoints

    (S3) Enhanced research skills.

    (S4) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

  • Contemporary Populist Politics: Britain in Comparative Perspective (POLI223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting25:75
    Aims

    To introduce students to the distinctive character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain and other established democracies;

    To equip students with an understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies;

    To enable students to identify and debate the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions;

    To engage students with some of the most important questions in contemporary western political science.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to identify and discuss the common and distinctive features of left- and right-wing populism in a range of established democracies.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare and contrast the character of contemporary populist political parties and movements in Britain with those in other established democracies.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate a sound understanding of the factors which have driven the rise of political populism in Britain and other established democracies.

    (LO4) Students will be able to outline and discuss the potential consequences of populism for mainstream party politics and for established democratic norms and institutions.

    (S1) Time management, organisation and adaptability

    (S2) Communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Ability to apply topic-specific knowledge and concepts; critical and analytical thinking

    (S5) Information gathering, evaluation and synthesis

    (S6) Ability to work under pressure

    (S7) Enhanced research skills.

  • Democratisation and Political Change in Southeast Asia (POLI235)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain:

    Awareness of the modern history of the struggle for democracy, as well as the main approaches to explaining the process of democratisation in comparative political science;

    A solid grasp of the debates over the most important factors associated with democratisation and democratic endurance;

    Knowledge of the political systems of Southeast Asia and some of the key cases of democratic transition and authoritarian endurance in the region;

    An empathetic understanding of the difficult choices that those living under undemocratic political systems face, and the continuing challenges of maintaining a democratic society.

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing:

    Experience applying social-scientific theories to particular cases;

    Familiarity with conducting qualitative comparisons between cases;

    Experience using elementary techniques of data analysis and data visualisation to engage in cross-sectional and longitudinal comparison of democratising countries.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to summarise the development and spread of representative democracy across the world, and identify the key events in this process.

    (LO2) You will be able to compare and contrast the three most important theoretical perspectives on democratisation: modernisation theory, transition theory and the social forces tradition.

    (LO3) You will be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of theories of democratisation, and to evaluate them against the empirical evidence.

    (LO4) You will be able to conduct paired qualitative case studies in order to identify factors and processes that relate to democratic transition and breakdown.

    (LO5) You will be able to use simple quantitative techniques in order to identify potential correlations between democratisation and socio-economic change.

    (LO6) You will be able to explain the relevance of key pieces of quantitative evidence for debates about democratisation.

    (LO7) You will be able to describe the main regional patterns of democracy in Southeast Asia and how they have been influenced by historical processes.

    (LO8) You will be able to give an account of the progress of democratisation in Southeast Asia, accounting for the successes and failures of pro-democracy movements in at least two states.

    (S1) Communication skills (speaking, listening and debating)

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Numeracy

    (S4) Ethical awareness

    (S5) Problem solving skills

    (S6) Communication Skills (written)

  • Devolution in the Uk (POLI227)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To analyse the impact of devolution in the UK upon its different parliaments and assemblies, assessing how politics in the different parts of the UK has changed; To assess how the Parliaments and assemblies in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland were introduced and have developed; To explore what has been the impact of these parliaments and assemblies for the party system in each country; To examine how do devolved institutions address societal divisions within each country; To assess what are the implications for the future of the United Kingdom of devolution.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Upon completion of the module, students should be able to:Identify the key conceptual principles of integration, federalism and devolution and their application to the UK.

    (LO2) Understand the historical attempts to devolve parliaments.

    (LO3) Comprehend the different powers of each devolved institution in the UK and assess the distinctive aspects of the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish politics and society that have shaped devolved institutions.

    (LO4) Analyse how devolution has impacted upon England.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

  • Foreign Policy Analysis and World Politics (POLI236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Through participating in the lectures, seminar discussions and by completing assessments students will gain:

    Knowledge of the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology;

    Awareness of the agent structure debate, the important question of how far human beings can consciously shape the course of world politics;

    Understanding of the various factors that shape the process of decision-making in international relations;

    Appreciation of some of the most significant factors shaping overall patterns of peace and conflict, friendship and enmity in world politics;

    In addition, the course is designed to augment student skills, providing:

    Experience deploying causal mechanisms theorised by scholars and  developing  original 'middle range' explanations for international events;

    Familiarity with the levels of analysis issue, an important issue in empirical research across the social sciences;

    Experience gathering, analysing and synthesising empirical evidence from news reports, policy briefings and primary sources.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to outline the main approaches to foreign policy and the classic contributions to the subfield, as well as describe the relevant contributions from conflict studies, political psychology and historical sociology.  

    (LO2) You will improve in your abilityto think critically and rigorously about thereasons why certain foreign policies are pursued over others in world politics.

    (LO3) You will be able to explain the significance of the levels of analysis problem for the study of international relations and the social sciences more generally.

    (LO4) You will be able to give an account of how structural factors within the international system shape foreign policy, what scholars mean by system and structure, and why scholars disagree about the nature of the international system.

    (LO5) You will be able to explain how 'second image' factors such as the internal organisation of the state, competition between government bureaucracies and domestic politics may influence foreign policy.

    (LO6) You will be able to explain how a foreign policy decision such as the initiation of war can be explained at different levels of analysis, such as the system, the dyad and/or the individual.

    (LO7) You will be able to locate reliable sources of information about events in world politics, and to utilise these information sources to write a cogent analysis of an event in world politics or a foreign policy decision - applying a theoretical framework to an empirical topic.

    (LO8) You will be able to explain what the agent-structure debate is and why it is analytically, morally and politically significant for how we think about the choices available to actors in world politics.

    (LO9) You will be able to explain how scholars combine causal mechanisms from multiple levels of analysis into theoretical explanations of foreign policy decisions and patterns of activity in international relations. You will be able to evaluate how successful these theories are in revealing the sources of foreign policy.

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) International awareness

    (S4) Problem solving skills

    (S5) Organisational skills

  • From the Ira to Isis: Understanding Political VIolence in the Contemporary World (POLI240)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To help students think critically about the world we live in today, specifically focusing on terrorism;

    To consider why and how terrorist groups come into existence and disappear;

    To examine the historical evolution of terrorism, the importance of terrorism in the contemporary world, different types of terrorism, and the responses to such threats;

    To think about why a universal definition of terrorism has proven so elusive and what this means for the study of terrorism;

    To explore the controversies that have been generated by terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to think critically about the world in which we live today, especially regarding the legitimacy of political violence.

    (LO2) An understanding of the key debates and controversies in the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    (LO3) The ability to engage in critical discussion about questions relating to terrorism and counter-terrorism.

    (LO4) The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

    (LO5)  An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

    (LO6) Make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (LO7) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

  • Governing Britain: Westminster, Whitehall and Beyond (POLI230)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ​​​​​Toconsider the functions ofpolitical institutions within the British political party system.

    To examine the structures and howthey develop, both as a result of their historical circumstances and theirattempts to deal with their current roles.

    To examine the power relationshipsbetween the institutions and the political parties.

    To better understand the environment faced byBritish political institutions and their operational relevance to contemporaryUK governance.


    Learning Outcomes

    ​Demonstrate in depth knowledge and understanding of the structures and processes of the UK Parliaments and Assemblies

    Compare and contrast powers held at Westminster, Holyrood, The Welsh Assembly, the Northern Ireland Assembly, and the London Assembly.​

    Understand and engage in contemporary debates surrounding the functioning of the power structures of the UK​

    Develop research skills to allow navigation and robust research of the institutions of British governance​

  • International Organisations (POLI225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To provide an understanding of the nature of modern state system and the role of international organisations within it;

    To explore central concepts and theories in International Relations and apply these in analyses of the challenges and conflicts faced by the international system;

    To explore mechanisms and policy instruments that International Institutions possess in managing the new world order;

    To assess critical arguments as to the limits of international institutions and the likely future developments;

    To assess interpretations of international law within global governance debates;

    To develop students' skills in synthesis and analysis, and in the presentation of clear and cogent arguments (both orally and in writing) of issues and controversies surrounding international system and its organisations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to understand the role of institutions in the international system.

    (LO2) Awareness of the role of global governance in the new world order.

    (LO3) Ability to explore powers and limits of international organisations and the role of international law and human rights.

    (LO4) Ability to apply core theories of international relations to major international organisations.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • International Political Economy (POLI209)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to examine the interplay between politics and economics and the way this relationship is influenced by domestic and international forces.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1)  Basic appreciation of the dynamic processes of international politics and economics.

    (LO2) An understandiung of a range of IPE theories, and why and how they evolved in response to developments

    (LO3) Familiarity with recent developments in IPE (globalisation, regionalism, economic crises, etc.), and how they relate to IPE theories.

    (LO4) Ability to compare and contrast theories and examine how they ‘fit’ with different periods of time and national and international circumstances.

    (LO5) The ability to use technical vocabulary fluently.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) The ability to apply abstract ideas to real world contexts.

    (S3) The appreciation of complexity, diversity of situations, events and distinguish the most relevant information.

    (S4) To engage with new ideas and perspectives and develop that information into a presentable format.

    (S5) Basic critical skills, including testing validity of statements and the operating the rules of evidence.

    (S6) Intellectual and research independence, derived from setting tasks and solving problems, exercising bibliographic skills, organising information, formulating appropriate questions, understanding the nature of the discipline.

    (S7) Marshalling of argument in written and/or oral form.

  • Security in A Globalised World (POLI231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide an overview of how security has been affected by globalisation; To explore how the understandings of security and globalisation have developed over time.; To develop a theoretical focus on security in global politics; To explore the main themes, issues, and political debates around security in a globalised world.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will have acquired knowledge of the main debates around security and globalisation.

    (LO2) The ability to critically discuss these issues.

    (LO3) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    (LO4) The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

    (LO5) An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

    (LO6) An ability to deliver short, small-group presentations where they convey information and ideas succinctly and effectively.

    (LO7) How to make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Time management

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Dissertation (MODL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent research at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a cultural, literary or linguistic topic of interest to them;

    To draw on and extend the skills and knowledge of relevant cultural, literary or linguistic issues and theoretical debates students have acquired in their taught modules;

    To produce a piece of individual research which presents an argument developed over 10,000 words, usually divided into Introduction, three chapters, and Conclusion.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Utilise a variety of bibliographical tools to locate a range of primary and secondary sources on which to base a research project.

    (LO2) Construct, focus and structure an independent project, in discussion with a personal supervisor working in that subject area.

    (LO3) Analyse source materials, and develop coherent and original arguments on the basis of research.

    (LO4) Engage critically with relevant cultural, literary or linguistic and / or theoretical debates on the topic.

    (LO5) Manage time effectively and efficiently and plan a long-term process of research, reading and writing.

    (LO6) Present a confident and coherent argument in clear written prose, following scholarly conventions of referencing and bibliography.

    (S1) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

    (S2) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S7) Time and project management - Project planning

    (S8) Time and project management - Project management

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S10) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Aspects of Cinematic Realism (FILM302)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module will introduce students to the theoretical and practical implications of the realist aesthetic as it has been interpreted at different times and places in the history of film. Using this central concept as a base, the module aims to make students aware of the evolution of critical and theoretical approaches to film, its function and its mode of operation, from classical film criticism, through the semiotically-based analyses of the sixties and seventies, to more recent concentration on spectatorship and audience reception;

    The module aims to encourage a critical evaluation of realism as aconcept and of particular film-texts in the light of the theory underlying their production;

    The module aims to equip students with skills to engage in careful textual analysis and to assess comparatively how different stylistic choices mediate audience engagement with the reality that is notionally represented;

    At final-year level this module aims to enable students to work at a level of some theoretical sophistication and to show ability to relate complex general ideas to particular instances.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle them with relation to specific texts.

    (LO2) An awareness of the critical and practical debates which have been engaged in Europe around the artistic potential and the vocational function of cinema, ability to assess the various positions critically and to formulate rigorous arguments to explain the student's own position.

    (LO3) Understanding of the various complex implications of an apparently simple concept.

    (LO4) Ability to express ideas succinctly and to carry out independent textual (visual) analysis.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S7) Information skills - Information accessing: Locating relevant information and identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S8) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Cinema and Narratives of French Society (FREN337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will study the ways in which French cinema has approached, and occasionally helped to construct, the history of the twentieth century. We will look at the options available to film-makers faced with the task of recording and representing their own society, including ways in which the construction of such narratives has been questioned, with a view to assessing cinema’s role in the never-ending process of construction of French cultural identity;

    The module aims to raise students’ awareness of the ways in which Frenchness has been represented;

    The module will introduce them to theories of cinematic representation and to the ways in which these impinge on the world-view of the spectator;

    Students will gain awareness of the role which cinema plays in society (French society especially);

    Students will gain experience in close analysis of the implications of key texts, through their formal choices as well as their content.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Awareness of the changing representation of French history and French society in a popular national medium.

    (LO2) Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle them with relation to specific texts

    (LO3) Ability to express ideas succinctly and to carry out extended independent textual (visual) analysis.

    (LO4) Ability to undertake critical analysis of cultural representations and to relate them appropriately to their context.

    (S1) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S9) Global citizenship - Understanding of equality and diversity

    (S10) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • The German Cinema Since 1990 (GRMN330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with a detailed knowledge of the German cinema since 1990 and its social and institutional context;           To sensitise students to debates about the return of popular-genre and star-led cinema in the German film industry since 1990 and the rise of so-called 'heritage' cinema;           To sensitise students to films as historical texts which emerge from and engage with the context of their production;            To sensitise students to film as an aesthetic artefact determined on the one hand by particular conditions of production (i.e. the studio system) and produced on the other according to cinematic conventions of film language, genre etc.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain an understanding of the ongoing development of film within the social, institutional and commercial context of the German film industry of the 1990s.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate a good understanding of the critical debates surrounding the return of genre cinema and popular film-making in the German film industry in the 1990s and they will be able to relate these to debates about German film-making before 1990.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate a critical understanding of the work of some of the most important film directors to have emerged in since 1990 and the relation of their work to traditions of German film-making and international trends

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate a critical grasp of a range of visual, textual and other historical material, an ability to extract and synthesise information and to express arguments cogently in writing.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Screening Spain: Contemporary Spanish Film and Television (HISP344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To analyse television, film (documentary and narrative) from Spain in the context of Spanish culture and wider theories of media and cultural studies;

    To examine a number of Spanish films and television productions with their broader sociohistorical, political and industrial contexts;

    To explore the ways in which Spanish film and television responds to and intervenes in contemporary social and political debates;

    To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an advanced understanding and knowledge of theories of film and television.

    (LO2) Be able to show how the texts studied on the course intervene in debates surrounding contemporary social and / or political issues.

    (LO3) Apply theoretical approaches or secondry literature to the analysis of film and television.

    (LO4) Successfully consider issues of representation in film and television in terms of Spanish cultural studies and media studies.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Independence

  • Italian Crime Stories: From Noir Fiction to Mafia Films (ITAL321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce and broaden the students’ perceptions of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film; To introduce a variety of theoretical and critical approaches and considers how the different sources can relate to each other and to society; To explore and analyse a variety of sources (including novels, films and TV series); To make students aware of relevant aspects of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film which they may wish to explore further in postgraduate research programmes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An ability to understand and discuss literary texts, films and other artefacts and to place these sources in its broader historical, cultural and social context.

    (LO2) An ability to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of written and audio-visual sources.  

    (LO3) Ability to demonstrate confidence in written analysis and debate

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Oral skills

    (S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Independence

    (S6) Research skills - Independent analysis

  • Queer Film, VIdeo and Documentary (COMM305)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to queer theory and queer politics through the history and analysis of the production and reception of moving images. To encourage students to develop advanced moving image analysis skills and use them to differentiate between the forms and practices of film, video and documentary. To introduce key concepts and key theories around LGBTQ+ identity as historically, culturally, and politically situated. To encourage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of LGBTQ+ equality and diversity through the theory, history, ethics, and politics of queer moving images. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of queer film, video and documentary.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate familiarity with key concepts and debates in queer theory.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate skills in advanced moving image analysis.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate a practical ability to facilitate a workshop discussion.

    (LO5) Students will demonstrate a practical ability to conceive of a thematic queer film season for an LGBT+ film festival with underpinning rationale and theory.

    (S1) Teamwork.

    (S2) Organisational skills.

    (S3) International awareness.

    (S4) Ethical awareness.

    (S5) Commercial awareness.

    (S6) Problem solving skills.

  • American Independent Cinema (COMM316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the industrial and economic conditions that have given birth to independent films, especially in the post-1980 period.   To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the aesthetic choices and representational strategies filmmakers of independent films have made and how those might differ from choices and strategies associated with dominant aesthetic and representational regimes.   To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the relationship of a number of independent films to broader social, cultural, political and ideological landscapes such as Reaganite politics, the politics of counter-culture, racial and gender politics, etc.  

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of the debates that have surrounded the concept of independence in American cinema.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an understanding of the manner in which independent film has been mobilised to respond to particular economic and social-cultural changes in the United States.

    (LO3) Be able to identify the key aesthetic choices employed in a number of such films and the ways in which they differ from dominant regimes of representation.

    (LO4) Be able to understand American independent cinema as an industrial product determined by a specific mode of production and circulation/distribution.

    (S1) Commercial awareness.

    (S2) Problem solving skills.

    (S3) Teamwork.

    (S4) Organisational skills.

    (S5) Communication skills.

    (S6) IT skills.

  • Stardom and Media Celebrity (COMM303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module is designed to introduce students to the academic disciplines of star studies and celebrity studies, and to help develop students’ understanding of vocabulary, theoretical perspectives, and advanced concepts related to the areas of stardom and media celebrity. It will encourage students to differentiate between historical periods in stardom and mediated identities, and across different media platforms and contexts. It will encourage students to widen their knowledge of public figures and celebrities via conceptual, technological, economic, political and formal approaches to the topic, and to make connections between the idea of stardom/fame and other media topics and discourses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts in and theoretical approaches to stardom and celebrity.

    (LO2) The student will critically evaluate historical shifts in celebrity cultures.

    (LO3) The student will analyse the roles played by audiences, actors, employers and different media forms in the construction of stardom.

    (LO4) The student will analyse the way in which case studies of specific examples illustrate stardom and celebrity.

    (LO5) The student will relate this analysis to wider concerns within mainstream filmmaking and media performance, across cinema, television, advertising, digital media, and alternative media forms.

    (S1) Proficient use of electronic resources and tools for research as specified and required.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis.

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice.

    (S5) Ability to analyse theories and concepts and apply knowledge.

    (S6) Ability to construct and convey a coherent argument in written form.

  • The Film Music of John Williams (MUSI370)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an account of John Williams' film music output (including stylistic development and compositional technique). To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams' film music and the narrative and dramatic content of the relevant films. To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams' film music and traditional or historical compositional techniques. To provide students with an appreciation of the contextual issues relevant to understanding John Williams' film music (e.g. Hollywood; directorial vision; populism etc).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of John Williams' film music output (from a stylistic perspective).

    (LO2) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between John Williams' film music and earlier compositional traditions and conventions.

    (LO3) To be able to relate elements of John William's compositional technique to specific film contexts or mechanics.

    (LO4) To demonstrate an awareness of broader critical and cultural issues, as relevant to situating John William's film music in context.

    (LO5) To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes). To original case-study film examples.

    (S1) Research skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Comprehension

    (S4) Writing skills

    (S5) Applied skills

    (S6) IT skills

    (S7) Critical Thinking

  • Screening Antiquity (CLAH330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module introduces students to the reception of antiquity on screen.  As well as enabling students to build knowledge and understanding of key strategies and themes in the representation of ancient Greece and Rome in film, television and video games, it encourages them to develop theoretical approaches and analytical skills for evaluating their shape and significance.  Over the course of the module, students become active critics of the depiction of the ancient world in popular culture.  Through the Group Project, they have an opportunity to produce a written scene for an ancient world film of their own invention and to reflect critically on their own creative processes. For students in Ancient History, Classics and Classical Studies, this module advances perspectives and understanding developed during CLAH 200 Politics of the Past and CLAH 211 Rebuilding Troy, by exploring the representation of the ancient history and myth in contemporary contexts.  Students on the Film Studies pathway will bring their methodological know-how and subject expertise to bear on a distinctive 'genre' of film, reaching out to the related media of television and video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To develop knowledge and understanding of the range, character, and inter-relationships of representations of the ancient world on screen, i.e. in the popular audio-visual media of film, television and video games and, hence, in the Western cultural imagination

    (LO2) To appreciate how the representation of ancient Greece and Rome on screen is informed by developments in technology and responds to and impacts upon contemporary politics and society

    (LO3) To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to adaptation, translation and intertextuality (between ancient and modern material, and between genres and media)

    (LO4) To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to technical and formal properties of audio-visual media and their representational strategies

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S3) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • Comparative Peace Processes (POLI336)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To outline the concept and components of peace processes;

    To assess the development and impact of peace processes within a range of polities;

    To understand the range of political solutions available in divided societies;

    To critically evaluate the validity of comparative approaches to peace processes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Upon completion of the module, students should be able to identify the key conceptual principles of peace process and their essential components.

    (LO2) Understand how peace processes develop.

    (LO3) Assess the impact of peace processes in a range of selected countries.

    (LO4) Comprehend the key factors in shaping successful or unsuccessful peace processes in each country of study and judge whether a comparative approach to conflict management is viable.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters' behaviour and parties' strategies;

    The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour.

    (LO2) You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections and contexts.

    (LO3) You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties.

    (LO4) You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis.

    (LO5) You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes.

    (LO6) You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) International awareness

    (S6) Teamwork

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) Adaptability

  • Comparative Voting Behaviour (POLI322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to equip students with the analytical skills needed to analyse election outcomes from the perspective of both voters' behaviour and parties' strategies;

    The module also aims to enable students to analyse survey data using quantitative methods; to provide them with sufficient knowledge of the statistical package SPSS; and to prepare students to write reports and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with public opinion and voting. By fulfilling these goals the module also aims at widening students' employability, enabling them to develop some of the main analytical and statistical skills which are demanded by employers.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to contrast the theoretical assumptions of structural, social-psychological and rational-choice models of voting behaviour.

    (LO2) You will be able to critically analyse the potential and limitations of voting behaviour models both in general and when applied to specific elections and contexts.

    (LO3) You will be able to critically analyse how voting behaviour varies across types of party, as well as the dynamic relationship between the behaviour of voters and parties.

    (LO4) You will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis.

    (LO5) You will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific election outcomes.

    (LO6) You will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

    (S5) International awareness

    (S6) Teamwork

    (S7) Communication skills

    (S8) Adaptability

  • Labour Thinkers (POLI326)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to a more in depth-focus on political ideas than was available in earlier years of study; To facilitate students with the capacity to evaluate political ideas and their application; To develop writing skills in terms of module assessments.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire a critical understanding of a selection of key LabourParty thinkers by examining their arguments.

    (LO2) Gain a sophisticated understanding of how Labour’s ideologicaldivisions are constructed.

    (LO3) Position Labour’s contemporary difficulties within their historicalcontext.

    (LO4) Critically examine the political and intellectual significance ofLabour thought over the course of recent history.

    (LO5) Analyse therelationship between Labour thinkers, economic capital, social justice, and theelectoral performance of the Party over the course of the 20thCentury.

    (S1) Written communication

    (S2) Verbal communication

    (S3) Critical thought

    (S4) respect for the opinions of others

  • Politics of Development (POLI314)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module will familiarise students with the historical development of the state in the global south, and the developmental trajectories, of key states in Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East. The module will teach students how to compare country cases within and across regions. Students will compose a policy paper, which challenges them to marshal empirical evidence to translate academic debates they encoutered during the module into a coherent analysis of policy options and clear policy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to critically engage with institutional theories of development.

    (LO2) A knowledge of key debates in the politics of development including the role of the state, democracy, good governance and the "resource curse".

    (LO3) To acquire knowledge of the developmental pathways of key countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

    (LO4) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued policy paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates and theories.

    (S1) Experience in applying social-scientific theories to particular cases, augmenting students' analytical skills.

    (S2) Familiarity with the techniques of qualitative research in comparative government and political sociology.

    (S3) Experience interpreting socio-economic development indicators.

  • Public Policy: An Advanced Introduction (POLI310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to concepts such as ‘the public’, ‘the private’, ‘power’; To introduce students to the core ideas that explain societies acceptance of and/or desire for state intervention in the form of a public policy; To introduce students to the ways state theory can be used to explain how decisions are reached in the policy process.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the key theoretical ideas underpinning public policy.

    (LO2) Students will understand the frameworks that have been developed to inform our understanding of the policy and decision-making processes.

    (LO3) Students will understand the difficulties policymakers encounter while engaged in policymaking.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S6) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S7) Information skills - Evaluation

  • The Media, the Internet and Political Science (POLI319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the ways in which contemporary notions of what constitutes political science have a bearing upon what we think we know about conventional and new media. To explore the way in which conceptions of power are related to our understanding of how the old and new media function in contemporary society. To explore a range of themes that connect the new media to its conventional counter parts (including the political economy of journalism, web-based political mobilisation, citizen journalism and mediate elections). To explore particularly illuminating examples of power exertion by or through the mass media. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to understand what constitutes the 'canons and conventions' of contemporary Political Science, and how these relate to research on, and evidence about, the old and new media.

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate the role and importance of the various media in power structures of society.

    (LO3) Students will be aware of how the old and new media relate to each other, both nationally and internationally, and how both relate to contemporary political realities.

    (LO4) Students will have a grasp of the key themes and case studies that link media practice, to politics/politicians, and the principal power models.

    (LO5) Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

  • Theories of Poverty and Wealth (POLI316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To help Students u nderstand the relationship that exists between poor/poverty/wealth in relation to the functions/purposes of the welfare state; To help students u nderstand how the core theories of the welfare state interpret the relationship between those considered as living in poverty/poor/wealthy; To help Students feel comfortable and capable of undertaking positive and constructive interactions in large and small group environments; To help students understand How different theories interpret the development and use of welfare-to-work programmes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An ability to make reasoned arguments linking the core theories of the welfare state to contemporary issues

    (LO2) An ability to make reasoned arguments relating to the connection between poverty/poor/wealth and how these help inform a range of different theories of the welfare state

    (LO3) An ability to make reasoned arguments about how welfare-to-work and workfare are changing the nature and shape of the contemporary welfare state and how a number of different theories of the welfare state understand these moves

    (S1) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • 'troubled Times': the Politics of the Conflict in Northern Ireland 1960-present (IRIS315)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
    Aims

    An overview of the historical background to the late 20th century phase of the Irish conflict;

    Knowledge of the immediate causes of the outburst of violence from 1968 onwards;

    Examination of the motives and strategies of the main participating elements in conflict;

    Examination of the peace process leading to the Agreement of 1998.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the historical and contemporary background to the Northern Ireland conflict.

    (LO2) An understanding of the motivations and strategies of key elements including the state and the paramilitary organisations from the late 1960s onwards.

    (LO3) An understanding of the main stages of development of the conflict since the late 1960s.

    (LO4) An understanding of how and why the conflict in its violent aspect was wound down and the ‘peace process’ initiated.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S6) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S7) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.