Film Studies BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: P303
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB-BBB / IB : 33 with no score less than 4. /
Modern-Languages-and-Cultures-4

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Introduction to Film Language (FILM101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the ways in which a film creates meaning, and to provide students with the ability to identify and explain the techniques used by a film-maker and the results obtained;

    ​To foster a capacity for precise and sophisticated observation, and for intelligent structured discussion of what is observed;

    To develop confidence and intellectual depth in discussion, ability to present information succinctly both orally and in writing;

    ​To develop students’ knowledge of the formal and technical language of film analysis​.

    Learning Outcomes

    Have a working knowledge of thetechnical vocabulary of cinema and be able to produce precise description ofthe construction of a piece of audiovisual material

    Critically analyse audio visualmaterial in terms of its mise-en-scène, camera-work, editing and soundtechnique, and to indicate how these elements contribute to the understandingof the whole​

    Observe and comment on the ways inwhich these elements may inflect the explicit meaning of the text​

    Understand and discuss differenttechniques of film narrative​

    Write clear and well-informedessay-work relating to the construction and meaning of film.​

  • Approaches to Film (FILM102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to key theoretical and conceptual debates within Film Studies;

    ​To develop students'' ability to apply theoretical and conceptual debates to close readings of film texts;

    To enhance students'' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    Show an awareness of the key theoretical and conceptual debates within Film Studies

    Understand film within its broader historical, cultural and social context

    Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of a film

    Successfully apply a close reading to films across a range of different national and industrial contexts

  • Introduction to Sound and Music in Audiovisual Media (MUSI170)
    LevelQ4
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
    1. To familiarise students with how sound is used in mutlimedia forms, with a particular emphasis on classical Hollywood film practices
    2. To establish the importance of sound on our interpretation of audiovisual media, and to explore how a change of soundtrack can encourage a different reading of the image.​ 
    3. ​To investigate the practicalities of composing for film: cues, editing cuts, synching etc.​ 

    4. To engage theoretically with audio-visual modes of discourse.​
    5. ​​To assess the critical problems of musical narrative and meaning.​ 
    Learning Outcomes​​To read and discuss key texts in a critical and comparative manner.

    To apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of music that combines audio, visual and literary theories and methods.​

    To discuss together sound, image and narrative and so display lateral and investigative essay writing skills.​
    To use appropriate theoretical frameworks as a basis for the critical analysis of a multimedia object.​
  • Sound, Image and Meaning (COMM152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a foundational understanding of:

    Notions of influence within work in Communication Studies

    The role of sound and visuals in signifying meaning in media texts

    How meaning and influence have been researched, and the difficulties involved in designing successful research in these areas

    In helping students to develop these types of knowledge and understanding, it seeks to provide skills that can be drawn on in subsequent modules that involve formal analysis of media texts and work on media content and institutional organisation more broadly.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will be able to develop a critical understanding of the role of reader interpretation in helping to determine the meaning of media texts and in guiding responses to them.

    ​​Students will be a ble to learn to analyse the ways in which different components of media texts are organised to signify meanings.

    ​Students will be able to gain an introductory understanding of the ways in which meaning and influence have been conceptualised and researched.

    ​Students will be able to practise and develop an ability to apply research, understanding and analysis in seminar and group discussion and in producing coursework.

  • Introduction to Film Research (FILM106)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To broaden anddeepen students’ understanding of film texts in context;

    To develop students'' critical skills when confronted with academic writing;

    To increase students'' confidence in handling theoretical concepts in relation to specific texts;

    To introducestudents to techniques of independent research, including question formulation,data-gathering, project organisation and time management.

    Learning OutcomesAn understanding of the study skills needed for an independently researched project.

    Ability to organise a project into appropriate chapters and stages etc.

    Ability to recognise and develop research worthy ideas and to explain their interest convincingly. 

    Ability to manage working time effectively and to take responsibility for regular tasks.

    ​​A deeper understanding of the concepts taught in other modules (especially FILM102) and an ability to use them to underpin independent research.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • The Cinematic City (FILM201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To explore ways in which European cinema has made use of the urban space (cinema having been described as an urban art-form par excellence);

    Through a wide range of films from different European countries, to introduce students both to issues relating to the imaginary conception of cities, and to concepts in film theory regarding the construction of space, the position of the observer, and the nature and purpose of representation and of narrative construction​;

    To introduce students to relatively complex theoretical constructions, in an immediate and approachable way, which will give them confidence in their ability to handle concepts in critical theory and to apply them successfully;

    To develop their capacities in expressing their ideas, both in discussion and in written work, with regard to more advanced material than they were required to study in the first-year module; ​

    To alert them to the conceptual links which film studies has with other theoretical fields;

    To introduce students in a simple way to the practical problems of audiovisual representation.

    Learning Outcomes

    Awareness of issues of urban theory, of the spatial implications of cinematic expression, and of the interaction of these; 

    Awareness of the ways in which cinema has been used to articulate the self-construction of urban societies​

    Alertness to the ways in which the modern world is constructed through representations​

    Ability to handle theoretical concepts confidently in written and oral modes, to carry on a discussion and sustain an argument by applying those concepts.

    ​Awareness of some of the practical issues involved in creating an audiovisual piece.

    ​Ability to plan the translation of experience of the city into audiovisual form.​

  • Propaganda and Censorship (FILM202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an insight into the interaction of film and political authority, the structures which the authorities use or have used in order to exert control on the cinema and the ways in which cinema’s power over its audience has been harnessed, manipulated or occasionally feared to the point of suppression;

    To examine specific films, scenes from them and the controversies around them as case studies of the interaction of film and political and/or other authority;

    To introduce students to theoretical debates about propaganda and censorship in Film Studies.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will gain a differentiatedunderstanding of the way in which political and other authorities have soughtto control, harness and curb the power of film in different historicalsituations. 

    Students will gain an awareness offilm’s position in national institutional structures and the effect of these onthe finished product and a historical perspective on the perceived purpose ofand limits on film production in Europe.

    Students will develop an alertness tothe ways in which film may seek to manipulate the viewer and a criticalattitude to the theories that have been constructed regarding the effects offilm on its audience.

    Students will develop an ability touse different kinds of textual evidence to present a balanced and sophisticatedargument about complex issues of representation and control and to reach areasoned conclusion recognising the power of social attitudes and desires inthe formulation and conduct of debates in these fields.​

  • The Italian Cinema (ITAL223)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    ​To introduce students to the major periods and some of the major films of one of the most significant of European National cinemas, through a selection of films which are available in sub-titled versions in this country;

    ​To give students an understanding of the range of Italian cinema, its influence on Europe as a whole, and its very particular nature (with a particular consideration to the strong division between the internationally influential ‘art-film’ production of the 1950s and 1960s, and the generic popular films which brought in the domestic audience and have recently begun to attract notice abroad);

    ​To broaden students’ perceptions of ‘European’ cinema, to give them a basis for comparison which they can use in their other modules on this course;

    ​To increase students’ analytical tools and vocabulary with respect to different types of cultural production;

    To increase students’ awareness of the social function of film (and cultural production in general) and the role it plays both for its audience and (to some extent) in the intellectual life of a culture in general;

    ​To make students aware of possible aspects of film culture which they may wish to explore further in their final year or during their year in Europe;

    To increase students’ confidence in written and oral analysis and debate.

     

    Learning Outcomes

    A broad knowledge of the history of Italian cinema so that students will be able both to compare it with other European cinemas and to assess current Italian films and issues in Italian cinema in a historical context.

    An awareness of the different roles and functions of ‘auteur’ and popular cinema, of the issues for film studies which these different types of production imply, and of some possibly fruitful avenues for further study.

    ​An ability to discuss both orally and in written form concepts relating both to formal innovation (where authorial intent must be taken into account) and to generic norms and issues of spectatorship (applying theoretical concepts to popular cultural forms)

    Confidence in dealing with film texts where (it must be assumed) the principal language is not one they are familiar with, and an ability to make allowances for this and to come to the appropriate terms with their own position in relation to the culture they are studying.

  • Introduction to French Cinema (FREN236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the basic language of film analysis;

    To introduce students to the rich cultural field which the cinema has represented in France through study of selected films from particularly significant periods, giving them a background of reference points and an understanding of how cinema has developed in France;​

    To cultivate habits of close visual analysis and careful structuring of such analysis​;

    To increase confidence in class discussion and presentation. ​

    Learning Outcomes

    Students should be able to give an intelligent and informed account of how any film (from whatever culture) is put together, the ways in which it engages its audience and the messages it conveys. 

    Students will develop thorough and perceptive powers of observation and interpretation of the elements of a cinematic text both visual and aural​

    Students will be able to explain their observations in a structured way, in written analyses and also orally in front of a class, in the latter case using visual aids when appropriate.

    Students will be able to insert their detailed observations into a thematic or historical context in order to show how a particular film deals with larger issues, and to construct a well-written essay to explain their ideas. ​

    ​Students should have a basic overview of major directors and trends in the history of the cinema in France, which will enable them to see other French films in their historical and artistic context.

  • Spanish and Latin American Cinemas: An Introduction (HISP229)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the cinematic dimension of Spanish and Latin American cultures;

     

    To create an awareness of the economic forces which frame the film industry in Spain and Latin America in specific areas of contemporary political and cultural life;

     

    To develop students'' skills in close textual analysis of a range of film texts;

     

    ​To explore the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts within Spain and Latin America.

     
    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate a knowledge of the cinematic practices and cultures of Spain and Latin America.

    ​Show an understanding of the ways in which Spanish and Latin American film are shaped by wider economic and cultural forces.

    ​Show an ability to apply close readings to film texts

    ​Display an understanding of the relationship between film, society and politics across various national contexts with Spain and Latin America.

  • German Cinema From the Expressionism to the Present (GRMN225)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To introduce students to the history of German national cinema from its origins to the present day with a special focus on Weimar Cinema, the Third Reich, post-war film, the New German Cinema of the 1960s and 1970s;

    To introduce students to the work of key German directors including F. W. Murnau, Fritz Lang, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog and Wim Wender;

    To sensitise students to films as historical texts which emerge from and engage with the context of their production;

    To sensitise students to film as an aesthetic artefact determined on the one hand by particular conditions of production (i.e. the studio system/‘Autorenkino’) and produced on the other according to cinematic conventions of film language, genre etc.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will understand the emergence and development of German national cinema from its origins until the present.

    Students will demonstrate a critical awareness of academic debates about major periods or movements in German film – Weimar film and ‘Expressionism’, the Third Reich, post-war cinema, the New German Cinema and post-unification cinema – and of current academic debates about them.​

    Students will develop critical and analytical skills enabling them to evaluate a variety of film materials from a range of different periods and styles.​

    Students will be able to evaluate a range of other varieties of textual and historical evidence, to assess its relative merits and to construct in verbal and written form clearly reasoned arguments on the basis of such evidence. ​

  • Immersive Media and VIrtual Worlds B (COMM211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. To introduce students to the histories of immersive media and virtual world forms
    2. To introduce students to theories and conceptual approaches to immersion, digital realism, cognition and simulation.
    3. To encourage students to develop advanced textual analysis skills in relation to virtual images.
    4. To encourage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of the industry contexts in which immersive experience and virtual worlds are produced and consumed.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​​Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the histories and theories of immersive experiences and virtual realities and worlds.

    ​​Students will demonstrate the capacity to develop critical insight and textual analysis skills of virtual reality texts.

    ​​Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate and accurate terminology and concepts when explaining immersive and virtual reality technologies.

    ​​Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industrial and entertainment contexts around, and uses of, immersive experiences and virtual realities.

  • Projecting China: An Introduction to Chinese Cinema (HIST277)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Todevelop students’ knowledge and understanding of contemporary Chinese cinema(principally produced in the People’s Republic of China), both in terms of itshistorical development and its recent spread around the world.

    Tointroduce a number of landmarks in the history of twentieth-century China,through their representations in filmic texts.

    Todevelop students’ abilities to present and organise arguments clearly, and toanalyse problems, in relation to these issues.

    Toenhance students’ skills in the critical evaluation of primary sources(specifically films) and historiography.

    Learning Outcomes

    Anability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondaryevidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians

    ​An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and anawareness of different historical methodologies.

    The ability to develop and sustainhistorical arguments and utilise evidence, with regard to the history andhistoriography of the development of Chinese cinema, as well as therepresentation of Chinese history in Chinese cinema. ​

  • Cinema and the Making of Modern India (HIST231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to post-colonial Indian history;

    To introduce students to using films as historical sources;

    To encourage students to consider the role of culture in fashioning identities and about the nature and challenges of being ‘post-colonial’, as well as about the nature and effects of globalisation;

     

     

     

    Learning OutcomesAn ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, including historical writings and the interpretations of historians.       An understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies.      

    An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon films as primary sources.

  • Music in Gaming (MUSI273)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​​- To provide students with an overview of technological development and a basic (non-technical) appreciation of how sound and music are generated via gaming software/hardware; and to understand the role of the former in determining compositional design across different ''generations'' of gaming hardware

    - To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between music and gaming contexts (e.g. genre, narrative function, immersion, emotion, and character portrayal)

    - To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between game-music and other forms of music (e.g. orchestral styles, film music, popular music in compiled tracks)
    Learning Outcomes

    ​​To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of gaming hardware/software and the extent to which this determines, by limiting or affording, the incorporation of sound/music

    ​​To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between music in gaming and other gameplay factors (such as narrative, immersion, game-cues)

    ​​To demonstrate an awareness of broader critical, cultural, and ludomusicological issues, as presented and discussed in both historical and contemporary scholarship

    ​​To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study examples

  • Global Hollywood B: From Film Art to Media Entertainment (COMM203)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    ​The aims of this module are:

    • To introduce students to the role played by the Hollywood film industry in the development of modern trans-national entertainment networks.
    • To enable students to understand the relationship between film style (aesthetics) and structures of industrial organization at various points in Hollywood''s history.
    • To provide students with an understanding of the ways in which national / cultural identities in Hollywood films relate to changing industrial and social contexts of film production and consumption.
    • To help students understand recent debates about media convergence and the globalisation of media entertainment​.
    Learning Outcomes

    Students will be familiar with a number of terms and concepts used in film criticism and analysis​​.​

    Students will have developed an understanding of the role played by US films in mobilising social and cultural identities, especially around particular formations of nationality and gender.​​​Students will have the ability to identify the commercial imperatives of film and television texts​.
  • Understanding Documentary (COMM282)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop an analytical knowledge of the range of purposes claimed for documentary work

  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop an analytical knowledge of key forms and approaches employed at different moments in the history of documentary

  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop an analytical knowledge of the relationship between documentary and the ''real world'' to which it refers

  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop an analytical knowledge of issues of ''truthfulness'' and the ethics of documentary representations

  • ​Students will be encouraged to develop an analytical knowledge of of documentary-makers'' strategies to appeal to audiences or yield responses from them

  • Learning Outcomes

    ​Demonstrates a critical awareness of debates surrounding the representation of ''the real'' in film and television texts

    ​​​​Demonstrates familiarity with and understanding of the terms and concepts used in describing and evaluating documentary work in film and television

    ​Demonstrates familiarity with and understanding of key visual and verbal components of documentary organisation

    ​Demonstrates the ability to read and critically evaluate film and television texts based on real subjects

  • Music in World Cinema (MUSI270)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To study the musical practices of film traditions outside the Anglophone world and their cultural contexts, with particular emphasis on comparisons to classical Hollywood practice

    - To build on knowledge acquired in first year modules on world music and music in audio-visual media

    - To develop students'' abilty to think and write about music in audio-visual contexts

    Learning Outcomes

    Ability to demonstrate familiarity with ideas about music and film in several other cultures.

    ​ Ability to explain the relationship between theory and the cultural context in which it has arisen, as well as the challenges of applying theories to texts from cultures outside that context. 

    ​Ability to deploy comparative and cross-cultural perspectives in the understanding of the relationships between music and film as well as their cultural contexts

    ​Higher level analytical and essay-writing skills, including ​Higher level analytical and essay-writing skills, including more advanced argumentation and handling difficult bibliographic challenges.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Dissertation (MODL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent research at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a cultural, literary or linguistic topic of interest to them.

    To draw on and extend the skills and knowledge of relevant cultural, literary or linguistic issues and theoretical debates students have acquired in their taught modules.

    To produce a piece of individual research which presents an argument developed over 10,000 words, usually divided into Introduction, three chapters, and Conclusion.

     

    Learning Outcomes

    Utilise a variety of bibliographical tools to locate a range of primary and secondary sources on which to base a research project.

    ​Construct, focus and structure an independent project, in discussion with a personal supervisor working in that subject area.

    ​Analyse source materials, and develop coherent and original arguments on the basis of research.

    ​Engage critically with relevant cultural, literary or linguistic and / or theoretical debates on the topic.

    ​Manage time effectively and efficiently and plan a long-term process of research, reading and writing.

    ​Present a confident and coherent argument in clear written prose, following scholarly conventions of referencing and bibliography.

  • Aspects of Cinematic Realism (FILM302)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

     The module will introduce students to the theoretical and practicalimplications of the realist aesthetic as it has been interpreted at different timesand places in the history of film.

    Using this central concept as a base, the module aims to make studentsaware of the evolution of critical and theoretical approaches to film, itsfunction and its mode of operation, from classical film criticism, through thesemiotically-based analyses of the sixties and seventies, to more recentconcentration on spectatorship and audience reception.

    The module aims to encourage a critical evaluation of realism as aconcept and of particular film-texts in the light of the theory underlyingtheir production ​

    The module aims to equip students with skills to engage in carefultextual analysis and to assess comparatively how different stylistic choicesmediate audience engagement with the reality that is notionally represented .

    At final-year level this module aims to enable students to work ata level of some theoretical sophistication and to show ability to relatecomplex general ideas to particular instances ​

       

    Learning Outcomes

    Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle themwith relation to specific texts.

    An awareness of the critical and practical debates which have beenengaged in Europe around the artistic potential and the vocational function ofcinema, ability to assess the various positions critically and to formulaterigorous arguments to explain the student''s own position.

    Understanding of the various compleximplications of an apparently simple concept.

    Ability to express ideas succinctlyand to carry out independent textual (visual) analysis.​

  • Cinema and Narratives of French Society (FREN337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will study the ways in which French cinema has approached, and occasionally helped to construct, the history of the twentieth century. We will look at the options available to film-makers faced with the task of recording and representing their own society, including ways in which the construction of such narratives has been questioned, with a view to assessing cinema’s role in the never-ending process of construction of French cultural identity;

    The module aims to raise students’ awareness of the ways in which Frenchness has been represented​;

    The module will introduce them to theories of cinematic representation and to the ways in which these impinge on the world-view of the spectator​;

    Students will gain awareness of the role which cinema plays in society (French society especially)​;

    Students will gain experience in close analysis of the implications of key texts, through their formal choices as well as their content. ​

    Learning Outcomes

    Awareness of the changing representation of French history and French society in a popular national medium.

    Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle them with relation to specific texts​

    Ability to express ideas succinctly and to carry out extended independent textual (visual) analysis.​

    Ability to undertake critical analysis of cultural representations and to relate them appropriately to their context.​

  • The German Cinema Since 1990 (GRMN330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

              To provide students with a detailed knowledge of the German cinema since 1990 and its social and institutional context; 

           To sensitise students to debates about the return of popular-genre and star-led cinema in the German film industry since 1990 and the rise of so-called ''heritage'' cinema;

              To sensitise students to films as historical texts which emerge from and engage with the context of their production;

             To sensitise students to film as an aesthetic artefact determined on the one hand by particular conditions of production (i.e. the studio system) and produced on the other according to cinematic conventions of film language, genre etc.​

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will gain an understanding of the ongoing development of film within the social, institutional and commercial context of the German film industry of the 1990s.

    Students will demonstrate a good understanding of the critical debates surrounding the return of genre cinema and popular film-making in the German film industry in the 1990s and they will be able to relate these to debates about German film-making before 1990. ​

    Students will demonstrate a critical understanding of the work of some of the most important film directors to have emerged in since 1990 and the relation of their work to traditions of German film-making and international trends

    Students will demonstrate a critical grasp of a range of visual, textual and other historical material, an ability to extract and synthesise information and to express arguments cogently in writing. ​

  • Screening Spain: Contemporary Spanish Film and Television (HISP344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To analyse television, film (documentary and narrative) from Spain in the context of Spanish culture and wider theories of media and cultural studies;

    To examine a number of Spanish films and television productions with their broader sociohistorical, political and industrial contexts;

    To explore the ways in which Spanish film and television responds to and intervenes in contemporary social and political debates;

    To enhance students'' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate an advanced understanding and knowledge of theories of film and television.

    Be able to show how the texts studied on the course intervene in debates surrounding contemporary social and / or political issues.

    Apply theoretical approaches or secondry literature to the analysis of film and television.
     

    ​Successfully consider issues of representation in film and television in terms of Spanish cultural studies and media studies.

  • Italian Crime Stories: From Noir Fiction to Mafia Films (ITAL321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce and broaden the students’ perceptions of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film;

    ​To introduce a variety of theoretical and critical approaches and considers how the different sources can relate to each other and to society;

    To explore and analyse a variety of sources (including novels, films and TV series);

    To make students aware of relevant aspects of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film which they may wish to explore further in postgraduate research programmes.

    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to understand and discuss literary texts, films and other artefacts and to place these sources in its broader historical, cultural and social context.

     

    An ability to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of written and audio-visual sources.  

    ​Ability to demonstrate confidence in written analysis and debate

  • Queer Film, VIdeo and Documentary (COMM305)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. To introduce students to queer theory and queer politics through the history and analysis of the production and reception of moving images.
    2. To encourage students to develop advanced moving image analysis skills and use them to differentiate between the forms and practices of film, video and documentary.
    3. To introduce key concepts and key theories around LGBTQ+ identity as historically, culturally, and politically situated.
    4. To encourage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of LGBTQ+ equality and diversity through the theory, history, ethics, and politics of queer moving images. ​
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of queer film, video and documentary.

    ​Students will demonstrate familiarity with key concepts and debates in queer theory.

    Students will demonstrate skills in advanced moving image analysis.​Students will demonstrate a practical ability to facilitate a workshop discussion.Students will demonstrate a practical ability to conceive of a thematic queer film season for an LGBT+ film festival with underpinning rationale and theory. 
  • American Independent Cinema (COMM316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    1. To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the industrial and economic conditions that have given birth to independent films, especially in the post-1980 period 
    2. To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the aesthetic choices and representational strategies filmmakers of independent films have made and how those might differ from choices and strategies associated with dominant aesthetic and representational regimes.  ​
    3. To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the relationship of a number of independent films to broader social, cultural, political and ideological landscapes (such as Reaganite politics, the politics of counter-culture, racial and gender politics, etc.) 

    Learning OutcomesDemonstrate an understanding of the debates that have surrounded the concept of independence in American cinema
    Demonstrate an understanding of the manner in which independent film has been mobilized to respond to particular economic and social-cultural changes in the United States

    Be able to identify the key aesthetic choices employed in a number of such films and the ways in which they differ from dominant regimes of representation

    ​Be able to understand American independent cinema as an industrial product determined by a specific mode of production and circulation/distribution
  • Stardom and Media Celebrity (COMM303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​This module is designed to introduce students to the academic disciplines of star studies and celebrity studies, and to help develop students’ understanding of vocabulary, theoretical perspectives, and advanced concepts related to the areas of stardom and media celebrity. It will encourage students to differentiate between historical periods in stardom and mediated identities, and across different media platforms and contexts. It will encourage students to widen their knowledge of public figures and celebrities via conceptual, technological, economic, political and formal approaches to the topic, and to make connections between the idea of stardom/fame and other media topics and discourses.

    Learning Outcomes

    The student will demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts in and theoretical approaches to stardom and celebrity.

    ​The student will critically evaluate historical shifts in celebrity cultures.

    ​The student will analyse the roles played by audiences, actors, employers and different media forms in the construction of stardom.

    ​The student will analyse the way in which case studies of specific examples illustrate stardom and celebrity.

    ​The student will relate this analysis to wider concerns within mainstream filmmaking and media performance, across cinema, television, advertising, digital media, and alternative media forms.

  • The Film Music of John Williams (MUSI370)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​​- To provide students with an account of John Williams'' film music output (including stylistic development and compositional technique)
    - To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams'' film music and the narrative and dramatic content of the relevant films
    - To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams'' film music and traditional or historical compositional techniques
    - To provide students with an appreciation of the contextual issues relevant to understanding John Williams'' film music (e.g. Hollywood; directorial vision; populism etc).

    Learning Outcomes

    ​​​To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of John Williams'' film music output (from a stylistic perspective)

    ​​​To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between John Williams'' film music and earlier compositional traditions and conventions

    ​​To be able to relate elements of John William''s compositional technique to specific film contexts or mechanics

    ​​​To demonstrate an awareness of broader critical and cultural issues, as relevant to situating John William''s film music in context

    ​​​To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study filmexamples

  • Screening Antiquity (CLAH330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module introduces students to the reception of antiquity on screen.  As well as enabling students to build knowledge and understanding of key strategies and themes in the representation of ancient Greece and Rome in film, television and video games, it encourages them to develop theoretical approaches and analytical skills for evaluating their shape and significance.  Over the course of the module, students become active critics of the depiction of the ancient world in popular culture.  Through the Group Project, they have an opportunity to produce a written scene for an ancient world film of their own invention and to reflect critically on their own creative processes.

    For students in Ancient History, Classics and Classical Studies, this module advances perspectives and understanding developed during CLAH 200 Politics of the Past and CLAH 211 Rebuilding Troy, by exploring the representation of the ancient history and myth in contemporary contexts.  Students on the Film Studies pathway will bring their methodological know-how and subject expertise to bear on a distinctive ''genre'' of film, reaching out to the related media of television and video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​To develop knowledge and understanding of the range, character, and inter-relationships of representations of the ancient world on screen, i.e. in the popular audio-visual media of film, television and video games and, hence, in the Western cultural imagination

    ​To appreciate how the representation of ancient Greece and Rome on screen is informed by developments in technology and responds to and impacts upon contemporary politics and society

    ​To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to adaptation, translation and intertextuality (between ancient and modern material, and between genres and media)

    ​​To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to technical and formal properties of audio-visual media and their representational strategies

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Dissertation (MODL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent research at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a cultural, literary or linguistic topic of interest to them.

    To draw on and extend the skills and knowledge of relevant cultural, literary or linguistic issues and theoretical debates students have acquired in their taught modules.

    To produce a piece of individual research which presents an argument developed over 10,000 words, usually divided into Introduction, three chapters, and Conclusion.

     

    Learning Outcomes

    Utilise a variety of bibliographical tools to locate a range of primary and secondary sources on which to base a research project.

    ​Construct, focus and structure an independent project, in discussion with a personal supervisor working in that subject area.

    ​Analyse source materials, and develop coherent and original arguments on the basis of research.

    ​Engage critically with relevant cultural, literary or linguistic and / or theoretical debates on the topic.

    ​Manage time effectively and efficiently and plan a long-term process of research, reading and writing.

    ​Present a confident and coherent argument in clear written prose, following scholarly conventions of referencing and bibliography.

  • Aspects of Cinematic Realism (FILM302)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

     The module will introduce students to the theoretical and practicalimplications of the realist aesthetic as it has been interpreted at different timesand places in the history of film.

    Using this central concept as a base, the module aims to make studentsaware of the evolution of critical and theoretical approaches to film, itsfunction and its mode of operation, from classical film criticism, through thesemiotically-based analyses of the sixties and seventies, to more recentconcentration on spectatorship and audience reception.

    The module aims to encourage a critical evaluation of realism as aconcept and of particular film-texts in the light of the theory underlyingtheir production ​

    The module aims to equip students with skills to engage in carefultextual analysis and to assess comparatively how different stylistic choicesmediate audience engagement with the reality that is notionally represented .

    At final-year level this module aims to enable students to work ata level of some theoretical sophistication and to show ability to relatecomplex general ideas to particular instances ​

       

    Learning Outcomes

    Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle themwith relation to specific texts.

    An awareness of the critical and practical debates which have beenengaged in Europe around the artistic potential and the vocational function ofcinema, ability to assess the various positions critically and to formulaterigorous arguments to explain the student''s own position.

    Understanding of the various compleximplications of an apparently simple concept.

    Ability to express ideas succinctlyand to carry out independent textual (visual) analysis.​

  • Cinema and Narratives of French Society (FREN337)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will study the ways in which French cinema has approached, and occasionally helped to construct, the history of the twentieth century. We will look at the options available to film-makers faced with the task of recording and representing their own society, including ways in which the construction of such narratives has been questioned, with a view to assessing cinema’s role in the never-ending process of construction of French cultural identity;

    The module aims to raise students’ awareness of the ways in which Frenchness has been represented​;

    The module will introduce them to theories of cinematic representation and to the ways in which these impinge on the world-view of the spectator​;

    Students will gain awareness of the role which cinema plays in society (French society especially)​;

    Students will gain experience in close analysis of the implications of key texts, through their formal choices as well as their content. ​

    Learning Outcomes

    Awareness of the changing representation of French history and French society in a popular national medium.

    Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle them with relation to specific texts​

    Ability to express ideas succinctly and to carry out extended independent textual (visual) analysis.​

    Ability to undertake critical analysis of cultural representations and to relate them appropriately to their context.​

  • The German Cinema Since 1990 (GRMN330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

              To provide students with a detailed knowledge of the German cinema since 1990 and its social and institutional context; 

           To sensitise students to debates about the return of popular-genre and star-led cinema in the German film industry since 1990 and the rise of so-called ''heritage'' cinema;

              To sensitise students to films as historical texts which emerge from and engage with the context of their production;

             To sensitise students to film as an aesthetic artefact determined on the one hand by particular conditions of production (i.e. the studio system) and produced on the other according to cinematic conventions of film language, genre etc.​

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will gain an understanding of the ongoing development of film within the social, institutional and commercial context of the German film industry of the 1990s.

    Students will demonstrate a good understanding of the critical debates surrounding the return of genre cinema and popular film-making in the German film industry in the 1990s and they will be able to relate these to debates about German film-making before 1990. ​

    Students will demonstrate a critical understanding of the work of some of the most important film directors to have emerged in since 1990 and the relation of their work to traditions of German film-making and international trends

    Students will demonstrate a critical grasp of a range of visual, textual and other historical material, an ability to extract and synthesise information and to express arguments cogently in writing. ​

  • Screening Spain: Contemporary Spanish Film and Television (HISP344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To analyse television, film (documentary and narrative) from Spain in the context of Spanish culture and wider theories of media and cultural studies;

    To examine a number of Spanish films and television productions with their broader sociohistorical, political and industrial contexts;

    To explore the ways in which Spanish film and television responds to and intervenes in contemporary social and political debates;

    To enhance students'' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate an advanced understanding and knowledge of theories of film and television.

    Be able to show how the texts studied on the course intervene in debates surrounding contemporary social and / or political issues.

    Apply theoretical approaches or secondry literature to the analysis of film and television.
     

    ​Successfully consider issues of representation in film and television in terms of Spanish cultural studies and media studies.

  • Italian Crime Stories: From Noir Fiction to Mafia Films (ITAL321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce and broaden the students’ perceptions of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film;

    ​To introduce a variety of theoretical and critical approaches and considers how the different sources can relate to each other and to society;

    To explore and analyse a variety of sources (including novels, films and TV series);

    To make students aware of relevant aspects of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film which they may wish to explore further in postgraduate research programmes.

    Learning Outcomes

    An ability to understand and discuss literary texts, films and other artefacts and to place these sources in its broader historical, cultural and social context.

     

    An ability to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of written and audio-visual sources.  

    ​Ability to demonstrate confidence in written analysis and debate

  • Queer Film, VIdeo and Documentary (COMM305)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. To introduce students to queer theory and queer politics through the history and analysis of the production and reception of moving images.
    2. To encourage students to develop advanced moving image analysis skills and use them to differentiate between the forms and practices of film, video and documentary.
    3. To introduce key concepts and key theories around LGBTQ+ identity as historically, culturally, and politically situated.
    4. To encourage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of LGBTQ+ equality and diversity through the theory, history, ethics, and politics of queer moving images. ​
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of queer film, video and documentary.

    ​Students will demonstrate familiarity with key concepts and debates in queer theory.

    Students will demonstrate skills in advanced moving image analysis.​Students will demonstrate a practical ability to facilitate a workshop discussion.Students will demonstrate a practical ability to conceive of a thematic queer film season for an LGBT+ film festival with underpinning rationale and theory. 
  • American Independent Cinema (COMM316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    1. To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the industrial and economic conditions that have given birth to independent films, especially in the post-1980 period 
    2. To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the aesthetic choices and representational strategies filmmakers of independent films have made and how those might differ from choices and strategies associated with dominant aesthetic and representational regimes.  ​
    3. To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the relationship of a number of independent films to broader social, cultural, political and ideological landscapes (such as Reaganite politics, the politics of counter-culture, racial and gender politics, etc.) 

    Learning OutcomesDemonstrate an understanding of the debates that have surrounded the concept of independence in American cinema
    Demonstrate an understanding of the manner in which independent film has been mobilized to respond to particular economic and social-cultural changes in the United States

    Be able to identify the key aesthetic choices employed in a number of such films and the ways in which they differ from dominant regimes of representation

    ​Be able to understand American independent cinema as an industrial product determined by a specific mode of production and circulation/distribution
  • Stardom and Media Celebrity (COMM303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​This module is designed to introduce students to the academic disciplines of star studies and celebrity studies, and to help develop students’ understanding of vocabulary, theoretical perspectives, and advanced concepts related to the areas of stardom and media celebrity. It will encourage students to differentiate between historical periods in stardom and mediated identities, and across different media platforms and contexts. It will encourage students to widen their knowledge of public figures and celebrities via conceptual, technological, economic, political and formal approaches to the topic, and to make connections between the idea of stardom/fame and other media topics and discourses.

    Learning Outcomes

    The student will demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts in and theoretical approaches to stardom and celebrity.

    ​The student will critically evaluate historical shifts in celebrity cultures.

    ​The student will analyse the roles played by audiences, actors, employers and different media forms in the construction of stardom.

    ​The student will analyse the way in which case studies of specific examples illustrate stardom and celebrity.

    ​The student will relate this analysis to wider concerns within mainstream filmmaking and media performance, across cinema, television, advertising, digital media, and alternative media forms.

  • The Film Music of John Williams (MUSI370)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​​- To provide students with an account of John Williams'' film music output (including stylistic development and compositional technique)
    - To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams'' film music and the narrative and dramatic content of the relevant films
    - To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams'' film music and traditional or historical compositional techniques
    - To provide students with an appreciation of the contextual issues relevant to understanding John Williams'' film music (e.g. Hollywood; directorial vision; populism etc).

    Learning Outcomes

    ​​​To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of John Williams'' film music output (from a stylistic perspective)

    ​​​To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between John Williams'' film music and earlier compositional traditions and conventions

    ​​To be able to relate elements of John William''s compositional technique to specific film contexts or mechanics

    ​​​To demonstrate an awareness of broader critical and cultural issues, as relevant to situating John William''s film music in context

    ​​​To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study filmexamples

  • Screening Antiquity (CLAH330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module introduces students to the reception of antiquity on screen.  As well as enabling students to build knowledge and understanding of key strategies and themes in the representation of ancient Greece and Rome in film, television and video games, it encourages them to develop theoretical approaches and analytical skills for evaluating their shape and significance.  Over the course of the module, students become active critics of the depiction of the ancient world in popular culture.  Through the Group Project, they have an opportunity to produce a written scene for an ancient world film of their own invention and to reflect critically on their own creative processes.

    For students in Ancient History, Classics and Classical Studies, this module advances perspectives and understanding developed during CLAH 200 Politics of the Past and CLAH 211 Rebuilding Troy, by exploring the representation of the ancient history and myth in contemporary contexts.  Students on the Film Studies pathway will bring their methodological know-how and subject expertise to bear on a distinctive ''genre'' of film, reaching out to the related media of television and video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​To develop knowledge and understanding of the range, character, and inter-relationships of representations of the ancient world on screen, i.e. in the popular audio-visual media of film, television and video games and, hence, in the Western cultural imagination

    ​To appreciate how the representation of ancient Greece and Rome on screen is informed by developments in technology and responds to and impacts upon contemporary politics and society

    ​To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to adaptation, translation and intertextuality (between ancient and modern material, and between genres and media)

    ​​To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to technical and formal properties of audio-visual media and their representational strategies

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will be taught in a mixture of formal lectures, seminars and small group tutorials where a friendly environment prevails and great attention is paid to giving feedback on assessed work.

In language classes, we make every effort to ensure that we have a small number of students compared to competitor institutions, which means that academic staff are able to support students to achieve their full potential. All language modules involve continuous assessment such as oral presentations, listening tests and grammar tests as well as exams. Tuition takes place in small groups with first-language speakers playing a prominent part and includes a range of skills such as listening, writing, speaking, interpreting and translation.

Students are also expected to make regular use of our fully-refurbished Language Lounge to enhance their own study. We encourage our students to become independent learners, and support them through our dedicated library resources in the Sydney Jones Library which is open 24-hour in term time. We also make extensive use of our virtual learning environment VITAL where students can complete structured tasks outside the classroom.


Assessment

Performance throughout the year is carefully monitored and used to supplement examinations. For language, such a programme of continuous assessment involves evaluating performance in a variety of written and oral exercises. Other modules have a mix of essay and exam assessment. Our aim is always to assess by methods of evaluation appropriate to the skills being developed and to allow students to gain credit for good work done during the year.

Exams take place at two points in the academic year: at the end of Semester One in January and at the end of the session in May, so that the workload is evenly distributed. As regards the final degree result, for language programmes, the second year’s work counts for 20%, the work done during the Year Abroad (foreign exams or extended essay or portfolio) counts for another 10%, and the final year’s work counts for 70%.