English Literature with Game Design Studies BA (Hons)

Key information


english-2

Module details

Single Honours students must take 120 credits in each year of study.

Programme Year One

You will take 6 compulsory modules and 2 options.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Introduction to Game Design Studies (SOTA101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To introduce students to the study of games from a variety of academic perspectives. 2. To introduce students to the specificity of video games as a particular media text, media audience, and media industry. 3. To encourage students to widen their knowledge of media forms and industries through video game culture and the contexts in which we make sense of them. 4. To introduce students to key concepts, theories, and debates related to the study of video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to describe key concepts and theories related to the study of video games.

    (LO2) Students will be able to explain the different aesthetic, social, political and industrial contexts of video games.

    (LO3) Students will be able to report on key aspects and institutions of the video game industry.

    (LO4) Students will be able to identify features of a game's design that are particularly relevant to or revealing of its context as media object.

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) International awareness

  • Games and Meaning (SOTA102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the concept of the holistic close reading and its history and importance for Arts scholarship. To enable students to develop skills in making meaning from specific aspects of game design. To develop students' ability to communicate about what game design can achieve. To demonstrate the importance of meaning in game design, and show how meaning is the product not only of intent but also social, economic and cultural conditions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to describe how meaning is made from specific individual features of video games and their relationships to one another.

    (LO2) Students should be able to produce coherent readings of disparate features of a video game and analyse their roles in sustaining theme and tone.

    (LO3) Students should be able to discuss the nature and aims of close reading, including issues of author intent, textuality and player experience, and their place within the study of art.

    (LO4) Students should be able to read and make meaning from five core areas of game design: camerawork, iconography, environmental design, difficulty and industrial context.

    (LO5) Students should be able to describe in-game events clearly to audiences unfamiliar with the game in question, and relate these to their industrial, economic and cultural contexts.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify unifying themes in extended works of art.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and reflect critically upon them.

    (S4) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S5) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to use and reference academic sources, and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S6) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skills in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S7) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S9) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, including online sources, video and screen capture and editing, and visual presentation aids.

  • Close Reading (ENGL103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To foster and enhance the skills of close reading by drawing attention to what is needed for close literary analysis of texts. To read texts attentively and to acquire appropriate vocabulary and techniques for successful close reading and to consider the implications of literary devices and techniques when both writing and reading literary texts. To enable students to criticise and write focused critical essays on the basis of their attentive reading, to discuss matters such as form, structure, voice and genre with confidence and using appropriate vocabulary. To expand our understanding and appreciation of texts and to consider the implications of using categories such as genre, structure, voice and form when analysing and discussing text.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students of this module will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) By the end of the module, student should be able to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) This module will engender awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (S1) The module equips students to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically

    (S2) Students undertaking this module will learn to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms

    (S3) The module seeks to provide students with the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology

  • Literature in Time (ENGL117)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    • To prepare students broadly for the study of literature at Levels Two and Three

    • To enable students to make informed Level Two module choices

    • To consider in detail how texts can be grouped in literary or cultural periods, and to examine the relationship between writing and different kinds of context, e.g. historical, biographical and print

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will have an awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (S1) Students will have the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically

    (S2) Students will have the ability to relate literary texts to different kinds of context (e.g. historical, biographical, or print)

    (S3) Students will have the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology

  • Literature and Place (ENGL102)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of literary texts in English from different genres and periods, linked by the thematic concept of Place. To consider these texts from a variety of historical and theoretical perspectives. To consider how texts from different locations and cultures, national and international, represent, generate and mediate the concept of place, and related ideas such as home, belonging, travel, and identity. To offer students introductory samples of literature of different types and historical contexts, reflecting Honours-level provision. To meet the hallmark criteria of Curriculum 2021.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and ability to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and ability to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Understanding of the ways in which ‘place’ has been generated within literature and represented, understood, and debated in literary texts of different kinds across time.

    (S1) Critical Reading

    (S2) Academic Research and Writing (including Referencing)

    (S3) Communication and teamwork

    (S4) Digital fluency

  • Ways of Reading (ENGL113)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    1. To allow students to consider the ways in which we read and write about literary texts in different contexts (political, historical, theoretical and aesthetic).

    2. To encourage students to consider how different methods of reading and interpretation improve understanding and analysis of literary texts.

    3. To introduce students to critical issues related the creation and reception of literary texts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will understand and apply critical, cultural and literary theory.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to make use of digital media to present ideas.

Programme Year Two

You will take one compulsory module, SOTA202. The remaining credits will be made up of optional modules, one of which will be COMM211, ENGL297, or MUSI273.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Different Play (SOTA202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the work of key queer theorists concerning games. To develop students' understandings of the ways in which games, rule sets and digital systems relate and contribute to broader culture. To broaden students' ideas of the kind of games it is possible to make. T o support students' ability to create work that challenges discrimination and marginalisation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to explain the relationship between queerness and play.

    (LO2) Students should be able to identify the key themes of queer theory relating to games, including representation, community, failure, appropriation and power.

    (LO3) Students should be able to analyse game design tropes and clichés and their role in reinforcing cultural norms.

    (LO4) Students should be able to relate their own creative ideas to social norms and expectations.

    (LO5) Students should be emboldened to challenge repressive and oppressive systems through the design of play experiences.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically about societal assumptions and unspoken conventions.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to present theoretical material through creative and descriptive expression.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to concisely convey the relevant details of a project or proposal.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to take seriously the views of others of different and marginalised identities.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to recognise and understand the implicit meanings of cultural artefacts and media.

    (S7) Students will learn to contextualise artistic features within aesthetic and cultural theory.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to identify and isolate relevant details of complex media works.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Immersive Media and VIrtual Worlds B (COMM211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the histories of immersive media and virtual world forms To introduce students to theories and conceptual approaches to immersion, digital realism, cognition and simulation. To encourage students to develop advanced textual analysis skills in relation to virtual images. To en courage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of the industry contexts in which immersive experience and virtual worlds are produced and consumed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the histories and theories of immersive experiences and virtual realities and worlds.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the capacity to develop critical insight and textual analysis skills of virtual reality texts.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate and accurate terminology and concepts when explaining immersive and virtual reality technologies.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industrial and entertainment contexts around, and uses of, immersive experiences and virtual realities.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Commercial awareness.

    (S3) Organisational skills.

    (S4) Communication skills.

    (S5) International awareness.

  • Games Playing Roles (ENGL297)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​This modulewill introduce students to the ways in which literature reflects trends ingaming and gamification, and the ways in which authors have used “games”,understood either as literary experiments or as imagined games, within theirworks. The format of the module (weekly seminars on texts, interspersed withworkshops) are intended to develop the ability to work independently, but alsoenhance students’ ability to discuss, evaluate, and implement ideas as agroup). Moreover, as it forms part of both the literary studies and gaming studies programmes, it will enable students from different disciiplinary backgrounds to engage with each other and encourage peer-to-peer learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​On completion of the module, students will be able to demonstrate

    1.  an understanding of the ways in which gamesrelate to contemporary literature at the level of form, structure, and content.


    ​2.  knowledge of the ways in which literary textscan engage with specific aesthetic, cultural, and historical contexts.

    ​3.  insight into the similarities and differencesbetween literary and ludic forms.

    ​4. plan, research, and execute an assignment that demonstrates theabove, alongside analytical skills and the ability to deploy appropriate terminology.

  • Music in Gaming (MUSI273)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an overview of technological development and a basic (non-technical) appreciation of how sound and music are generated via gaming software/hardware; and to understand the role of the former in determining compositional design across different 'generations' of gaming hardware.

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between music and gaming contexts (eg genre, narrative function, immersion, emotion, and character portrayal).

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between game-music and other forms of music (eg orchestral styles, film music, popular music in compiled tracks).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of gaming hardware/software and the extent to which this determines, by limiting or affording, the incorporation of sound/music.

    (LO2) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between music in gaming and other gameplay factors (such as narrative, immersion, game-cues).

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate an awareness of broader critical, cultural, and ludomusicological issues, as presented and discussed in both historical and contemporary scholarship.

    (LO4) Students will be able to be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study examples.

    (S1) Communication skills.

    (S2) Research skills.

    (S3) Comprehension.

    (S4) Critical thinking.

    (S5) Writing skills.

    (S6) Applied skills.

    (S7) IT skills.

  • Declaring Independence: American Literature to 1900 (ENGL201)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The aims of this module are: to trace the historical development of American literature through the American Renaissance to the end of the nineteenth century; to examine burgeoning movements such as American Gothic and Transcendentalism among other topics; to analyse how American writers engage with the subject of their nation, especially with the stated ideals of the new republic; and to explore the different formal means they employ to express American identities.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completing this module, students will be able to demonstrate awareness and understanding of: - the evolution of American literature from the seventeenth century up to c.1900

    (LO2) The range of styles with which American writers of the period describe their past or situate themselves in relation to American culture

    (LO3) The tradition of criticism of this literature

    (LO4) The ability to demonstrate their own confident critical understanding of American literature of the period

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

  • Friars, Whores and Rovers: Drama 1580-1640 (ENGL213)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce you to the variety of interesting and important theatre in the period 1580-1640 and to encourage an intelligent analysis of drama as a genre, involving the ability to respond to the plays via a number of different approaches.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module you should be able to find ways of cross-referencing and comparing plays in terms of genre, convention and theatrical mode as well as having an understanding of staging contexts and an ability to respond to them creatively.

    (S1) Problem solving: critical thinking, creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Positive attitude and self-confidence: a 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute, and openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen.

    (S3) Research management: developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting and using data, applying research methods, and applying ethics.

  • Victorian Literature (ENGL243)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The main aims of the module are to provide intensive study of a wide range of writing between 1837 and 1901, including the development of the realist novel, the problematic status of poetry, and the rise of women writers and to provide a context for such study in the light of the social and religious changes of the period.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate familiarity with a wide range of Victorian works, in all their differing forms and characteristics.

    (LO2) An ability to produce written work on the texts of the period, demonstrating analytical skill, critical and contextual awareness and awareness of good academic practice.

    (LO3) The ability to discuss knowledgeably a period of rich diversity and change. The student will have some awareness of contextual problems of belief, identity, and social order, as well as personal, family, sexual and public relations which lie behind Victorian questioning.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing, including referencing skills

    (S7) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S10) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S11) Information skills - Information accessing:Locating relevant information and Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S12) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Restoration and Eighteenth-century Literature: Poetry, Prose and Drama 1660-1789 (ENGL272)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The module will introduce students to the wide range of writing in the period 1660-1789, including the rise of the novel and developments within poetic and dramatic genres. The module will investigate the literature of the period in the context of developments in society, in enlightenment thought and in the modes of literary production and consumption.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Substantial knowledge of literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century.

    (LO2) Improved reading skills specific to understanding and analysing this literature.

    (LO3) An informed sense of the wider cultural history of the period and the interconnections between its writings.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing including referencing skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications, eg work processing, databases, spreadsheets

    (S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

  • Creativity: Socially-engaged Writing Practice (ENGL275)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. The aims of the module are: to give students an opportunity to think about how creative writing engages with a global society, social justice, political and environmental issues and human rights.

    2.  To introduce and develop an awareness of the creative writing process, across poetry, prose, literary essays, journalist writing, reviews and other forms of online and printed writing.

    3.  To develop writing skills in conjunction with an understanding of social activism.

    4.  To introduce and develop an awareness of the function and importance of the drafting process.

    5.  To foster independent reading of contemporary writing in a variety of genre and media.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have a knowledge and understanding of the range of approaches to writing and social activism;

    (LO2) Students will have an ability to constructively evaluate their own writing and that of their peers;

    (LO3) Students will have a familiarity of and an experimentation with a variety of literary techniques;

    (LO4) Students will have a practical insight into the creation of texts that will feed into their understanding of contemporary social and political issues.

    (LO5) Students will have an understanding through practical work of the range of options available to writers engaging with social activism.

    (LO6) Students will have a familiarity and experimentation with a range of literary techniques and writing styles.

    (LO7) Students will have an independent thinking around contemporary approaches to socially-engaged writing practice processes.

    (S1) Research skills

    (S2) Employability skills (journalistic writing)

    (S3) Global citzenship

    (S4) Creativity

  • Modernist Magazines: History, Fiction and the Literary Periodical (ENGL299)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To enable students to examine the major literary magazines of the long twentieth century from a diversity of contexts;

    To introduce students to the magazine culture and its contexts in historical change of the long twentieth century;

    To consider writers’ innovations via analysis of the work of their predecessors and contemporaries;

    To encourage students to engage in the detailed study of both primary and secondary texts;

    To encourage students to consider magazine material culture and the systems of its production.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To appreciate the breadth and diversity of literary magazines in the long twentieth century.

    (LO2) To help students will acquire reading and writing skills appropriate to the advanced study of literature.

    (LO3) To encourage students to present their own ideas, in positive engagement with both primary and secondary sources and to encourage that presentation in both oral and written form.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

  • Romantic Literature (ENGL218)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    To introduce you to a wide range of texts from the Romantic and pre-Romantic period. To improve reading skills specific to those texts. To give you an informed sense of the wider cultural history of the time and the interconnections between different forms of writing in the period.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate awareness of a range of literary forms and idioms in English Literature from c. 1770 to c. 1830

    (LO2) Show an awareness of main issues in the literature of the period

    (LO3) Relate elements of this literature to specific historical and cultural contexts

    (LO4) Investigate these issues in individual and collaborative discussion

    (LO5) Plan, research, and execute an assessed essay showing the application of the above skills, and demonstrate these skills and appropriate knowledge in a three-hour examination

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Rethinking American Fiction (ENGL210)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aims of this module are as follows:

    - To enable students to engage with a cross-section of American literature from the 20th and 21st centuries

    - To allow students to become conversant with the major critical contexts of this era, to understand how these critical debates are conducted.

    - To provide students with the materials to perform a critique of American literature and culture.

    - To attract students who are interested in approaching the study of American literature as an inherently international practice.

    - To develop skills in the comparison of literary and critical/theoretical writing, and in the understanding of how to apply theoretical contexts to contemporary literary contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completing this module students will have acquired a knowledge and understanding of a range of twentieth and twenty-first-century American fiction.

    (LO2) Developed a vocabulary for the critical analysis of this literature and an understanding of the construction and critique of the American canon.

    (LO3) Gained an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which this literature was produced.

    (LO4) Gained an appreciation of the place of this literature within the traditions of literature in English.

    (S1) International awareness: An understanding of American literature and culture as a global matter.

    (S2) Independent research and essay writing skills: Ability to research and develop ideas in the form of an assessed essay.

    (S3) Assessment planning skills: Ability to create a piece of formative assessment and develop it, through feedback and academic support, into a summative piece of written coursework.

    (S4) Communication skills: Ability to discuss the cultural discourse of American literature of the 20th and 21st centuries in a seminar group.

  • Modernist Literature: 1900-1945 (ENGL232)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    To equip you with the sophisticated reading skills needed to interpret modernist texts.
    To examine previous critical responses to these texts and weigh arguments against each other.
    To compare techniques developed by writers with those developed by artists in other media, including painting, music and film.
    To develop a critical appreciation of experimental narrative techniques, their purposes, effects, and implications. 
    To develop and deploy the nuanced forms of expression which will enable you to articulate your responses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to interpret subtle or ambiguous qualities of a text (such as tone, voice, and structure), and justify your interpretation.

    (LO2) You will be able to cite a range of critical perspectives and explain which aspects of the course texts are elucidated by particular critical arguments.

    (LO3) You will have developed the confidence to talk about a modernist painting or piece of music and an appreciation of concerns shared by artists in different media.

    (LO4) You will be able to discuss the implications of various narrative styles and techniques (eg. interior monologue, allusion, 'unreliable' narration).

    (LO5) You will have extended and refined your critical vocabulary and powers of argument such that you can clearly communicate your ideas about the course texts.

    (S1) Ability to form sustained, coherent arguments with evidence marshalled from disparate and challenging sources.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Medieval Narratives (ENGL270)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce a range of medieval narrative literature and common themes found there through studying a variety of texts in the original Middle English, alongside some others written in Anglo-Norman (studied in translation).
    To provide a basic reading knowledge of Middle English.
    To introduce students to the issues involved in editing early literature.
    To introduce students to a range of medieval cultural, intellectual, and literary contexts through the study of Middle English literature.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop an appreciation of the diversity of medieval narratives.

    (LO2) Students will understand and have a critical appreciation of major narrative texts within the medieval period.

    (LO3) Students will develop enhanced reading and critical skills relative to this literature.

    (LO4) Students will have a basic reading ability in Middle English language.

    (LO5) Students will have an appreciation of the place of this literature within the broader context of English literary history.

    (LO6) Students will have a basic understanding of how early texts might be edited.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication: oral, written and visual - Academic writing, including referencing skills

    (S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S7) Information skills - Information accessing: Locating relevant information and Identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

  • Banned: Fiction, Sex and the Limits of Decency (ENGL298)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to censorship and the debates around its informal and formal use;

    To equip students to study the novel and its relationship with censorship;

    To help students to see the relationship between censorship and the cultural and historical contexts in which it arose.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the major debates around the censorship of literature.

    (LO2) An understanding of key issues in the secondary literature in this area;

    (LO3) The development of the reading and writing skills appropriate to criticism of the genres

    (LO4) An ability to develop their own opinions in positive engagement with the secondary literature.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Time and project management - personal organisation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

Programme Year Three

You will take two compulsory modules in Game Design Studies. The rest of your modules will be taken from English Literature, although you may also have options from other contributing Departments.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Philosophy of Play and the VIrtual (PHIL343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the main contemporary issues around play and games. To develop students understanding of the relationships between play, labour and virtuality. To enable students to reflect on their own preconceptions of play and value.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain the importance of play as a topic for study.

    (LO2) Students will be able to analyse common topics of discourse around play and games, especially digital games: violence, addiction, therapeutic and educational effects, and gamification.

    (LO3) Students will be able to identify philosophical issues arising from specific games/instances of play.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain some of the philosophical literature around play, make-believe, choice and responsibility, and virtual worlds.

    (LO5) Students will be able to trace connections between surface controversies and deeper philosophical concerns.

    (LO6) Students will develop their ability to reflect on their own preconceptions and how these contribute to both philosophical and popular discourse.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify unifying philosophical issues in everyday discussions and mass-media environments.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to identify their own presumptions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, use and reference academic sources, and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S7) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S10) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, including online sources, video and screen capture and editing, and visual presentation aids.

  • History of Academic Game Studies (SOTA302)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the key themes of academic game studies. To enable students to develop skills in analysing and criticising academic work on games. T o develop students' ability formulate and present arguments that relate academic theory to contemporary structures and conventions of games culture and industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to critically engage with academic theorising about games in relation to the actual business, design and consumption of games.

    (LO2) Students should be able to deploy fundamental concepts of game studies such as the magic circle, ludus and paidia, agon, alea, mimicry and vertigo etc.

    (LO3) Students should be able to break down particular industrial, cultural and historical contexts to show how these influenced the formation of key movements in academic game studies, especially ludology.

    (LO4) Students should be able draw historical connections between different periods and movements in the study of games.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S4) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce essays.

    (S7) Students will enhance their written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of information.

    (S10) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • American Poetic Writing Since 1930 (ENGL302)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore and explain the prominence of such poets as Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, Gwendolyn Brooks and Jorie Graham in American poetry from 1930 to the present.
    To familiarise students with the work of some of their representative inheritors and followers in the "Confessional", “Beat” and “New York” schools.
    To address the major concerns of the American tradition in the wake of Modernism: reactions to materialism, the role of Emersonian individualism, the use of idiomatic language, and the development of the poetic line.
    To analyse parallel and later developments, including some or all of the following: relations between the literary and the oral; the growth of jazz-inflected poetry and relations between poetry and song; the feminist poetics of Adrienne Rich; and the postmodern aesthetic of John Ashbery.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Improved reading skills applied to American poetry since 1930 and to poetry more generally.

    (LO2) An enhanced understanding of poetics.

    (LO3) An increased understanding of the literary, methodological, historical and cultural contexts of the poetic writing of the period.

    (LO4) An ability to question the presuppositions of these contexts in a critically informed manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

  • Millennial Literature and Culture (ENGL301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of this module are as follows:

    - To enable students to engage with a cross-section of international literature (fiction and non-fiction) from 1990 to the present day and to understand the concept of "millennial culture" as scholarly discipline.

    - To allow students to become conversant with the major critical contexts of this era, to understand how these critical debates are conducted.

    - To provide students with the materials to perform a critique of literature of the 1990s and 21st century within a social and political context.

    - To attract students who are interested in approaching the study of contemporary literature as an inherently international practice.

    - To develop skills in the comparison of literary and critical/theoretical writing, and in the understanding of how to apply theoretical contexts to contemporary literary contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify the impact of critical and cultural arguments surrounding literature and criticism of the late 20th and early 21st century.

    (LO2) To recognise different modes of contemporary writing and identify the social, political and cultural context within which they were created.

    (LO3) To acquire and display a developed vocabulary of the critical terminology specific to the millennial era.

    (LO4) To articulate the cultural relationship between literary and theoretical texts related to millennial culture.

    (LO5) To recognise and respond to the discourse of millennial literature and culture as an inherently international undertaking.

    (S1) Organisational skills: Ability to understand and critique the terminology of millennial literature and culture.

    (S2) Communication skills: Ability to discuss the cultural discourse of the late 20th and early 21st century in designated teaching sessions.

    (S3) International awareness: An understanding of millennial literature and culture as an international engagement.

    (S4) Independent research and essay writing skills: Ability to research and develop ideas in the form of an assessed essay

    (S5) Assessment planning skills: Ability to create a piece of formative assessment and develop it, through feedback and academic support, into a summative piece of written coursework.

  • Women Writers (ENGL347)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The main aims of this module are to explore the work of a variety of women writers across a range of genres, including poetry, prose (fiction and non-fiction) and autobiography (fictional and non-fictional). To read women's writing in the context of feminist critical theory and debate, but without insisting upon femininist interpretation or response as the only valid response to works by women.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completing this module students should have acquired an informed awareness of the richness and diversity of women's writing and its place in the traditions of literature in English.

    (LO2) By the end of this module students should be able to engage with some aspects of feminist theoretical debate and be able to discuss its relations to women's writing.

    (LO3) Over the course of the module students will have had the opportunity to develop a written style that suits their own particular outlook on and interests in women's writing and the opportunity it offers to create new modes of expression or argument.

    (LO4) By the end of the module students will have acquired experience in selecting and completing essays on topics of their own choice and gained an understanding of what makes a feasible and interesting subject for an essay of 3,000 words.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • Talking Pictures: Comics and Pictorial Narrative (ENGL362)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of a range of texts within the tradition of comics, pictorial narrative and graphic literature.

    To develop a sense of the possible relationships between visual and verbal exposition and narrative form.

    To develop an understanding of the cultural, intellectual and historical contexts of comics and graphic literature.

    To develop an understanding of the cultural, intellectual and historical contexts of comics and graphic literature.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An enhanced sense of the range of the expressive possibilities of grahpic literature.

    (LO2) An understanding of various literary and artistic techniques.

    (LO3) Enhanced reading skills in relation to verbal and visual modes of narrative, and the relationships between the two.     

    (LO4) An enhanced knowledge and understanding of the cultural and historical contexts in which graphic literature developed.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S7) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • Shakespeare: Page Stage Screen (ENGL368)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to both a more advanced and dynamic way of understanding Shakespearean drama by looking at the plays in relation to textual/editorial and theatrical practice, as well as cinematic adaptation. To assess how our interpretations of Shakespeare's plays might both inform and be informed by specific questions of editing, staging, directing, and adaptation. To address how the texts of the plays appeared in Shakespeare’s own time (i.e. in Quartos and in the Folio), and how and why modern editors have dealt with them subsequently.  To explore how original printed texts, sources, and subsequent adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays can develop our knowledge and understanding of Shakespeare's dramatic art and stagecraft. To examine the treatment of the plays studied in later editions and adaptations, as well as in later performances, on stage and on film.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire, develop, and demonstrate a detailed knowledge of Shakespeare's plays in relation to the textual and theatrical practices of their original contexts as well as of their subsequent adaptation by editors and theatre and film directors.

    (LO2) Develop and engage with a more complex and advanced understanding of Shakespeare as dramatist, in terms of how his work has been received, edited, performed, and adapted from the time of their original composition, staging, and publication to the present.

    (LO3) Recognise and implement a broad range of approaches to text and performance, whether in terms of close reading and critical interpretation/analysis, editing, staging, or cinematic adaptation.

    (LO4) Analyse and discuss the plays, their texts, sources, and adaptations in terms of their literary style, significance, and contexts, putting into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.  

    (LO5) Research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a specialised level.   

    (LO6) Work co-operatively and productively with others to produce a coherent team-work project (i.e. the editing task)

    (LO7) Evaluate and communicate both your own and others’ ideas.

    (S1) Written communication skills (style & argument, presentation & referencing)

    (S2) Oral communication skills (speaking, listening, arguing, persuading)

    (S3) Critical thinking and analysis

    (S4) Project planning & development

    (S5) Time management, discipline, & organisation

    (S6) Team working & co-operating/communicating with others

    (S7) Research skills (including identification and use of Library resources, and accessing online databases/research tools)

    (S8) IT skills (including word processing and the use of online resources and electronic media)

  • Medieval Boundaries: Text, Image (ENGL375)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    To offer students a chance to explore medieval culture, in its own terms and in relation to post-medieval and modern western culture, including considerations of the relationships between medieval and modern across literature and images (pictures, cartoon, film). In doing so students are also encouraged to break down boundaries imposed by later conceptualisations between medieval genres and between such concepts as religious and secular, dream and waking, imagined and real, human and animal/monster.   To help students to read and study medieval texts culturally and linguistically (both in the original language and through translations, as appropriate).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to demonstrate familiarity with medieval forms of English language and read texts written in Middle English with some confidence.

    (LO2) Over the course of the module students should acquire the capacity to read and discuss certain medieval models of experience and visualisation and relate these to modern attitudes and so be able to discuss critical and theoretical perspectives on literature, images and culture in the context of medieval studies.

    (LO3) By the end of the module students should have attained knowledge of a variety of medieval literary genres and be able to discuss the reception of medieval literature in post-medieval cultures.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S5) Cultural awareness

    (S6) Use of Middle English and Oxford English dictionaries both online and in print.

    (S7) literary critical skills

    (S8) time management

  • Language and Literature (ENGL383)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts. To introduce you to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts. To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches. To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Your analytical skills will be sharpened.

    (LO2) Your knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened.

    (LO3) You will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Late Modernism (ENGL498)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to theories of Late Modernism;

    To develop students' skills in textual criticism;

    To improve students' presentation and discussion skills;

    To mentor students through initiating and completing a research project on a topic related to the theme of Late Modernism.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge of theories of late modernism and of late modernist literature.

    (LO2) Discuss texts in relation to their political, social, and cultural contexts.

    (LO3) Research fruitfully and write fluently about literary texts.

    (S1) Presentation skills

    (S2) Written communication skills

    (S3) Time management skills

    (S4) Research skills

  • British Poetic Writing Since 1930 (ENGL305)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To generate an informed study of British poetry from c.1930s – the present. To develop skills in close reading, buttressed by an increased understanding of the literary, theoretical, aesthetic and historical contexts for poetry writing. To pursue an enquiry informed by (and critical of) ideas of nation, theory and poetics into the developments of poetry in this period with a view to questions of race, class, language and gender.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will gain an enhanced understanding of poetics.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to write about poetry for a non-specialist reader.

  • Gothic Fiction and Film (ENGL325)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To enable students to develop a broader understanding of the historical development of the Gothic genre and its relationships to other literary and cinematic genres. To facilitate research skills in relation both to primary material and key theoretical and critical debates. To broaden and deepen students' understanding of relationships between literature, film and other visual and technological media. To interrogate definitions of Gothic and to evaluate both the distinctive characteristics and conventions of the genre and the stability of boundaries between Gothic and other literary and cinematic genres.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Develop a historical perspective on the emergence and development of the Gothic genre from the 18th century to the present, identifying key literary and cinematic works and their relationship to other cultural and/or artistic movements.

    (LO2) Develop skills of critical analysis of both literary and cinematic works and of theoretical approaches to the text/film relationship.

    (LO3) Understand and evaluate key critical debates about and theoretical approaches (psychoanalysis, feminism, deconstruction, etc.) to Gothic fiction and film.

    (LO4) Relate generic tropes and conventions to wider cultural considerations (artistic, political, religious, technological, etc.) and vice versa.

    (LO5) Develop skills of critical writing, incorporating both conceptual argument and detailed close analysis of literary texts and films. Develop an appropriate technical and/or theoretical vocabulary for critical analysis of literature and film.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S7) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S8) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • Noir: Literature,film,art (ENGL321)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting33:67
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of a range of cultural artefacts within Noir. An enhanced sense of the range of writing, film and art in the genre of Noir. To develop a sense of the relationships between literary and non-literary, particularly visual mdia. To develop an understanding of the political, intellectual and historical contexts of Noir.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An enhanced sense of the range of writing, film and art in the genre of Noir.

    (LO2) An enhanced understanding of various literary, cinematic and artistic techniques.

    (LO3) Enhanced reading skills in relation to literary and other cultural artefacts

    (LO4) An enhanced knowledge and understanding of the cultural and historical contexts in which Noir is situated.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S7) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • Modern American Fiction (ENGL331)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to survey a cross-section of American fiction from c.1920 to the early 21st century. It follows a roughly chronological sequence and sets out to reveal the thematic concerns and narrative modes linking different works in this area. We shall be considering these writers' treatment of ethnic minorities, rural displacement, technological progress and particularly shall be concentrating on their stance towards America. In the course of discussions the module also aims to develop a vocabulary for the critical analysis of this fiction.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completing this module students will have acquired a knowledge and understanding of a range of twentieth and twenty-first-century American fiction.

    (LO2) Developed a vocabulary for the critical analysis of this literature.

    (LO3) Gained an appreciation of the historical and cultural contexts in which this literature was produced.

    (LO4) Gained an appreciation of the place of this literature within the traditions of literature in English.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

  • The Novel: 1740-1830 (ENGL386)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The module will introduce students to a variety of forms of prose fiction in the period 1740-1830. The module will give students an understanding of how the novel developed in the century following the earliest British examples.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Substantial knowledge of prose fiction in the latter half of the 'long eighteenth century'

    (LO2) Understanding of some central issues and options in genre and in narrative form and their consequences.

    (LO3) Understanding of the uses of 'realism' and its contraries, in an important phase of the development of the novel.

    (LO4) Understanding of such concepts as sensibility, 'sense' and 'prudence', the gothic the supernatural, and understanding some of their uses.

    (S1) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S2) Research skills - All Information skills

  • The Fin De Siecle: Literature and Culture 1880-1910 (ENGL395)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The main aims of this module are: ·         to encourage students to broaden and deepen their understanding of the late-Victorian period and the diverse cultural movements and trends associated with it through study of a wide variety of written and visual texts; ·         to facilitate research skills and the use of a range of primary non-literary materials in relation to literary texts; ·         to provide students with a contextualised understanding of the fin-de-siècle period in relation to both the Victorian period in general and the subsequent period of Modernist experimentation; to investigate the validity of identifying fin-de-siècle culture as ‘separate’ from mainstream Victorianism and Modernism, and critically to assess claims for its distinctive aesthetic, political, social and ethical concerns.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) identify key elements of fin-de-siècle culture and place this into the context of the period’s relationship with the Victorian age in general and the cultural climate of the early years of the twentieth century;

    (LO2) discuss in a critically informed manner a diverse body of literary, visual and cultural texts from the fin de siècle in the context of wider Victorian debates about art, science, progress, sexuality etc;

    (LO3) relate aesthetic and generic issues with social/political/ethical ones and vice versa;

    (LO4) critically assess the ways in which the concept of the fin de siècle has been constructed both in late-nineteenth-century discourses (such as degeneration theory) and in current critical debates;

    (LO5) write in a literary and critical style which is attuned to and develops in response to the artistic product under analysis.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take risk

    (S3) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Flexibility/Adaptability

  • James Joyce: A Writing Life (ENGL499)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To engage with the oeuvre of James Joyce at an advanced level, considering his stylistic progression from the early stories to the final complex workings of Finnegans Wake;

    To provide students with the necessary historical and sociological background to understand the environmental conditions that produces a writer of Joyce’s stature and motivations;

    To provide students with a thorough understanding of the biographical facts of Joyce’s life and the ways in which this biography feeds into his work; 

    To encourage students, through seminar presentations, thorough compulsory reading and, finally, through a lengthy end-of-semester essay to reflect on the extraordinary range of Joyce’s achievement both in an Irish and in a world context.

    Seminar presentations will stress the importance of constructing a valid and lucid literary-historical argument under pressures designed to mirror an academic conference.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire the knowledge, interpretive and analytical skills appropriate to the advanced study of literature;

    (LO2) Learn to present their own ideas and assessments by engaging with the main primary and secondary sources;

    (LO3) Develop their communicative and presentational skills in both oral and written form;

    (LO4) Develop an appreciation for the unique achievement of James Joyce.

    (S1) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - listening skills

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S7) Information skills - critical reading

    (S8) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

  • Dissertation (over Both Semesters) (ENGL380)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them. To build on students' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

    (LO2) Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

    (LO3) Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

    (LO4) Construct an original argument to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

    (LO5) Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

    (LO6) Work independently.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - Project management

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S9) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

  • Creative Writing (prose) (ENGL377)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of the module are: To give students an opportunity to develop practical prose writing skills in conjunction with the development of critical and theoretical reading in relation to prose genres; To extend awareness of the function and importance of the drafting process in relation to prose; To foster independent reading of contemporary literature in prose; To refine student understanding of the importance of literary models in the development of their own writing practice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have learned compositional techniques and methods (including drafting and reflection skills) appropriate to the genre.

    (LO2) Students will be able to draw on a range of literary techniques, e.g. image, symbol, point of view.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of genre and an awareness of the range of options available to the short story writer.

    (LO4) Students will be able to constructively edit and evaluate their own prose and that of their peers.

    (LO5) Students will be able to reflect on various aspects of the creative process.

    (S1) Adaptability.

    (S2) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis.

    (S5) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice.

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills.

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience.

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking.

    (S9) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take risk.

    (S11) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S12) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative.

  • Postcolonial Literature and Theory (ENGL401)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Acquire, develop, and demonstrate knowledge of the historical impact of British colonisation and colonial discourse on the literary culture of a range of countries located in Africa, South Asia and the Anglophone Caribbean.   Understand the establishment and development of postcolonial studies as an academic discipline.  Analyse and discuss the different literary and linguistic strategies postcolonial writers deploy to address colonial history and the postcolonial condition.  Critique a range of influential theoretical texts and apply these texts to literary contexts. Develop advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire and develop knowledge of the impact of British colonial history in a range of countries and their postcolonial legacies

    (LO2) Students will critically analyse the different literary and linguistic strategies used by writers from a range of Anglophone ex-colonies

    (LO3) Students will read, judge and discuss a range of postcolonial theoretical and conceptual texts

    (LO4) Students will improve independent research and essay writing skills

    (LO5) Students will be aware of literary traditions and cultural discourses which produce postcolonial literature and theory.

    (S1) Knowledge and understanding of the unique literary and linguistic features of postcolonial literature and theory.

    (S2) Knowledge and application of precise theoretical terminology.

    (S3) Awareness of how postcolonial literature and theory are positioned within a global context

  • Literature, Science and Science Fiction (ENGL403)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to: Enhance students’ understanding of the relationship between literature and science. Develop students’ critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in its scientific context. Use literature to think about science in its social and political context across different historical periods and its relationship to issues such as religion, class, climate change, artificial intelligence and genetic engineering.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of the module, students will have: the ability to demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of literary texts which engage with scientific ideas, practices and forms of writing, within their cultural context.

    (LO2) The ability to engage critically with scientific texts in relation to literary contexts and ways of reading.

    (LO3) The ability to demonstrate a critical understanding of debates concerning the relationship between literature and the sciences.

    (LO4) The ability to put into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.

    (LO5) The ability to research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a more specialised level.

    (LO6) The ability to evaluate and communicate effectively both their own and others’ ideas.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

  • Renaissance Poetry (ENGL327)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting34:66
    Aims

    The aims of the module are: to introduce students to a range of poetic writing from the Renaissance period; to develop students’ understanding of poetic form and its development and manipulation; to enable students to read the poetry of the period in relation to its political, cultural and intellectual contexts; to develop students’ capacity to communicate ideas clearly in written and spoken form.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have the ability to write fluent prose which conveys independent research and evaluation of materials, theories, and concepts.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate capacity to develop focused research attitudes and pursue projects independently.

    (LO3) Students will apply understanding of Renaissance poetic conventions and knowledge of the cultural and historical contexts in which Renaissance poetry was written and read.

    (S1) Students will gain practical research skills to retrieve and handle information from a variety of sources.

    (S2) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to communicate ideas with concision and clarity.

  • Almost Shakespeare (ENGL359)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of ‘offshoot’ texts that rework Shakespeare's plays in a number of formats and genres (fiction, poetry, drama, graphic literature, and film) produced by writers from Britain, America, and elsewhere throughout the twentieth century. To address how Shakespeare's works and the 'Shakespeare myth' are figured, received, and understood through twentieth-century literary reworkings. To examine questions of influence, reception, and intertextuality in these 'offshoot' texts, which have a life and status different from straightforward 'adaptations', and to consider how these works are derivative yet 'original' and distinct as literary works. To explore how these writings interpret the text that they either continue or re-play or 'answer', revising how we see the original text and at other times subverting and dismantling it in more radical ways. To assess the social and political issues surrounding various writers' creative and imaginative engagements with Shakespeare in terms of (for example) gender, race, sexuality, nation, and ideas of culture. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire, develop, and demonstrate knowledge of the literary culture and history of the Shakespearean 'offshoot' (its writers, its forms, its issues) throughout the twentieth century and to the present.

    (LO2) Acquire, develop, and demonstrate a nuanced understanding of the relationship between Shakespeare's works and their twentieth-century 'offshoots' through recognition of the intertextual and interpretative dialogues going on between them.

    (LO3) Recognise this literature’s relationship to Shakespeare's life and works, and the broader social and political concerns surrounding creative and imaginative reworkings of them (e.g. in terms of gender, race, sexuality, nation, and questions of low or popular versus high culture).

    (LO4) Analyse and discuss a range of texts (fiction, drama, poetry) in terms of their literary style, significance, and contexts, putting into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.  

    (LO5) Research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a specialised level.   

    (LO6) Evaluate and communicate both your own and others’ ideas.

    (S1) Written communication skills (style & argument, presentation & referencing)

    (S2) Oral communication skills (speaking, listening, arguing, persuading)

    (S3) Critical thinking and analytical skills

    (S4) Project planning & development

    (S5) Time management, discipline, & organisation

    (S6) Team working & co-operating/communicating with others

    (S7) Research skills (including identification and use of Library resources, and accessing online databases/research tools)

    (S8) IT skills (including word processing and the use of online resources and electronic media)

  • Creative Writing (poetry) (ENGL372)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students an opportunity to develop practical poetry writing skills in conjunction with the development of critical readings of poetry. To make students aware of the function and importance of the drafting process. T o establish student awareness of the writing process. T o foster independent reading of contemporary poetry. T o understand the importance of literary models.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn compositional techniques and methods (including drafting and reflection skills) appropriate to the genre.

    (LO2) Students will use a range of literary techniques.

    (LO3) Students will constructively evaluate their own poetry and that of their peers in the context of contemporary writing.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

  • Children's Literature (ENGL373)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    To explore the critical study of children's literature in a literary academic context;  to consider the variety of types of writing for children, the aims of children's literature, dominant motifs and the question of a tradition, concentrating on writing from the "golden age" of children's literature (late C19th); and to explore the relation of such material to adult literature and the popularity of writing for children among an adult audience.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of, and ability to discuss in an informed way, the breadth of Children's Literature and recurrent themes within it.

    (LO2) Awareness of the development of Children's Literature as a topic for academic literary study.

    (LO3) An informed appreciation of the literary value of the texts considered.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Early Modern Crime Writing (ENGL381)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module is designed to introduce students to a range of literary and other writing on themes of crime and detection between the years 1590-1850; these writings are not normally covered within the standard syllabus.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module, the students will be able to:-

    1. demonstrate a knowledge of writing about crime before the establishment of formal genres of detective fiction;
    2. demonstrate an understanding of some of the main issues relating to genre and form in these writings;
    3. demonstrate an understanding of the historical setting of some of the texts, and the issues involved in treating texts with a particular historical moment;
    4. demonstrate an awareness of the ethical issues involved in reading and writing about 'crime'.
  • Early Modern Women Writers (ENGL382)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    This module is designed to introduce students to arange of writing by women before 1795. These writers do not commonly figure on the main literature syllabus or on our existing courses on women writers.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module, the students will be able to:-

     

    1. Demonstrate a substantial knowledge of writing by women over the period 1600-1795.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the theoretical issues involved in studying writing by women
    3. Demonstrate an understanding of the critical issues involved in studying literature from an early period in historical context
    4. Demonstrate an awareness of change and development in these areas over the timespan of the period
  • School of the Arts Work Placements Module (SOTA300)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context. To apply within that practical or vocational context professional, pedagogical, theoretical and other knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of the placement materials and/or tasks. To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context, and reflect and report on the relationship between the two. To develop and identify a range of personal/ employability skills, and reflect and report on this development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    (LO2) To reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) To identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) To identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

    (S1) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will experience a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, with no modules being taught entirely through lectures. Alongside independent study and research, some modules require timetabled student group work. We provide an online programme of study skills to help with the necessary standards of referencing and presentation in written work. Tutorials allow for discussion of key readings, concepts and ideas, typically in groups of up to nine students.
Seminar groups are larger, but do not normally exceed 18; they usually last for between one and a half to two hours. Workshops are similar in size but have a more distinct practical element (eg in drama or language modules). In addition, in Years Two and Three, you will participate to a greater or lesser extent in a range of other formative activities: seminar presentations, creative writing and peer teaching.


Assessment

The main modes of assessment are through a combination of essay and examination, but depending on the modules taken you may encounter project work, presentations (individual or group), and portfolios of creative work or specific tests focused on editing, translation or etymological tasks.