English Language with Game Design Studies BA (Hons)

Key information


english-3

Module details

Programme Year One

Your first year is made up entirely of compulsory modules to enable you to build the foundational knowledge required to take you through the rest of your programme.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Introduction to Language Study (ENGL107)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with specialist skills in the linguistic analysis of language data which will enable students to identify and describe examples of linguistic variation in English. Students will develop specialist skills allowing them to select the correct phonetic symbols (from the International Phonetic Alphabet) and linguistic terminology when discussing linguistic phenomena. The module seeks to embody an approach to learning that empowers students to discuss linguistic variation in relation to relevant and appropriate scholarly work and to recognise the expressive resources of language. Students will develop subject-specific knowledge that will allow them to explain how relevant theoretical concepts (topical and ethical) apply to real language data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

  • English Language in Context (ENGL116)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:

    To equip students with key concepts in basic linguistic analysis.

    To introduce students to the importance of context in shaping language.

    To raise student awareness of the communicative purposes served through language use.

    To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to analyse and interpret a wide range of language data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a clear intake of key concepts in basic linguistic analysis.

    (LO2) Use technical vocabulary accurately.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a clear understanding of the importance of context in shaping language.

    (LO4) Exhibit knowledge and understanding of the communicative functions of language.

    (LO5) Appreciate the different ways of studying the English language.

    (LO6) Analyse and interpret a range of naturally occurring data.

    (LO7) Demonstrate familiarity with digital resources for language analysis.

    (LO8) The ability to analyse and interpret data and sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (LO9) The ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (LO10) The ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S1) Read closely and critically.

    (S2) Write clearly, accurately and effectively.

    (S3) Apply scholarly bibliographic skills appropriate to the subject.

    (S4) Present information within wider contexts.

    (S5) Plan, organise and report to deadline.

    (S6) Articulate their own and other people’s ideas concisely, accurately and persuasively both orally and in writing.

    (S7) Develop working relationships with others in teams, especially through constructive dialogue (for example, by listening, asking and responding to questions).

    (S8) Be sensitive to cultural contexts when working with others.

    (S9) Applying creativity and rigour to problem-solving, adapting to different demands and tasks.

  • Introduction to Stylistics (ENGL105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module has several aims. In the first instance, the module seeks to introduce students to the study of literary linguistics (also known as stylistics). Secondly, it aims to familiarise students with several key ideas in language study. Thirdly, it equips students to understand and explain how language works in a wide range of texts. The fourth and final aim of the module is to provide students with the tools to analyse literary texts (in the broadest sense of the phrase) in a precise and rigorous manner.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will have an awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (S1) Students will have the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically

    (S2) Students will have the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms

    (S3) Students will have the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology

  • Attitudes to English (ENGL106)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
    Aims

    To gain an understanding of:
    • what is an ‘attitude’ towards language and how it arises in a particular socio-cultural context;
    • some of the most important ideological trends that have shaped speakers’ attitudes to language use in a variety of geographical, socio-cultural and political domains in the history of English (1300-present);
    • the social and cultural consequences of ‘having an attitude’ towards language use;
    • the ‘discourses’ through which language attitudes are expressed, both nationally and internationally.

    To acquire specialist knowledge of:
    • selected frameworks and methodologies that researchers typically use to explore attitudes to language;
    • appropriate protocols and procedures to develop students’ own attitudinal studies.

    To develop students’ confidence by encouraging them to:
    • examine historical and contemporary texts/language samples in an informed and critical manner;
    • collect their own ‘attitudinal’ data;
    • apply the socio-historical concepts, theories and methodologies seen in class to real-life language examples and situations both within and outside the UK context
    • actively reflect on how the practices, protocols and methods seen in the module are transferable to the work-place.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of:
    The ability to analyse and interpret data and sophisticated texts closely and critically

    (LO2) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with:
    The ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms

    (LO3) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to:
    The ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology

    (S1) Application of IT and numeracy

    (S2) Critical thinking

    (S3) Complex problem solving

    (S4) Data handling

    (S5) Intellectual ability

  • Introduction to Game Design Studies (SOTA101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To introduce students to the study of games from a variety of academic perspectives. 2. To introduce students to the specificity of video games as a particular media text, media audience, and media industry. 3. To encourage students to widen their knowledge of media forms and industries through video game culture and the contexts in which we make sense of them. 4. To introduce students to key concepts, theories, and debates related to the study of video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to describe key concepts and theories related to the study of video games.

    (LO2) Students will be able to explain the different aesthetic, social, political and industrial contexts of video games.

    (LO3) Students will be able to report on key aspects and institutions of the video game industry.

    (LO4) Students will be able to identify features of a game's design that are particularly relevant to or revealing of its context as media object.

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) International awareness

  • Games and Meaning (SOTA102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the concept of the holistic close reading and its history and importance for Arts scholarship. To enable students to develop skills in making meaning from specific aspects of game design. To develop students' ability to communicate about what game design can achieve. To demonstrate the importance of meaning in game design, and show how meaning is the product not only of intent but also social, economic and cultural conditions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to describe how meaning is made from specific individual features of video games and their relationships to one another.

    (LO2) Students should be able to produce coherent readings of disparate features of a video game and analyse their roles in sustaining theme and tone.

    (LO3) Students should be able to discuss the nature and aims of close reading, including issues of author intent, textuality and player experience, and their place within the study of art.

    (LO4) Students should be able to read and make meaning from five core areas of game design: camerawork, iconography, environmental design, difficulty and industrial context.

    (LO5) Students should be able to describe in-game events clearly to audiences unfamiliar with the game in question, and relate these to their industrial, economic and cultural contexts.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify unifying themes in extended works of art.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and reflect critically upon them.

    (S4) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S5) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to use and reference academic sources, and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S6) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skills in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S7) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S9) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, including online sources, video and screen capture and editing, and visual presentation aids.

Programme Year Two

You will take one compulsory module, SOTA202. The remaining credits will be made up of optional modules, one of which will be COMM211, ENGL297, or MUSI273.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Different Play (SOTA202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the work of key queer theorists concerning games. To develop students' understandings of the ways in which games, rule sets and digital systems relate and contribute to broader culture. To broaden students' ideas of the kind of games it is possible to make. T o support students' ability to create work that challenges discrimination and marginalisation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to explain the relationship between queerness and play.

    (LO2) Students should be able to identify the key themes of queer theory relating to games, including representation, community, failure, appropriation and power.

    (LO3) Students should be able to analyse game design tropes and clichés and their role in reinforcing cultural norms.

    (LO4) Students should be able to relate their own creative ideas to social norms and expectations.

    (LO5) Students should be emboldened to challenge repressive and oppressive systems through the design of play experiences.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically about societal assumptions and unspoken conventions.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to present theoretical material through creative and descriptive expression.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to concisely convey the relevant details of a project or proposal.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to take seriously the views of others of different and marginalised identities.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to recognise and understand the implicit meanings of cultural artefacts and media.

    (S7) Students will learn to contextualise artistic features within aesthetic and cultural theory.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to identify and isolate relevant details of complex media works.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Immersive Media and VIrtual Worlds B (COMM211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the histories of immersive media and virtual world forms To introduce students to theories and conceptual approaches to immersion, digital realism, cognition and simulation. To encourage students to develop advanced textual analysis skills in relation to virtual images. To en courage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of the industry contexts in which immersive experience and virtual worlds are produced and consumed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the histories and theories of immersive experiences and virtual realities and worlds.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the capacity to develop critical insight and textual analysis skills of virtual reality texts.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate and accurate terminology and concepts when explaining immersive and virtual reality technologies.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industrial and entertainment contexts around, and uses of, immersive experiences and virtual realities.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Commercial awareness.

    (S3) Organisational skills.

    (S4) Communication skills.

    (S5) International awareness.

  • Games Playing Roles (ENGL297)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​This modulewill introduce students to the ways in which literature reflects trends ingaming and gamification, and the ways in which authors have used “games”,understood either as literary experiments or as imagined games, within theirworks. The format of the module (weekly seminars on texts, interspersed withworkshops) are intended to develop the ability to work independently, but alsoenhance students’ ability to discuss, evaluate, and implement ideas as agroup). Moreover, as it forms part of both the literary studies and gaming studies programmes, it will enable students from different disciiplinary backgrounds to engage with each other and encourage peer-to-peer learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​On completion of the module, students will be able to demonstrate

    1.  an understanding of the ways in which gamesrelate to contemporary literature at the level of form, structure, and content.


    ​2.  knowledge of the ways in which literary textscan engage with specific aesthetic, cultural, and historical contexts.

    ​3.  insight into the similarities and differencesbetween literary and ludic forms.

    ​4. plan, research, and execute an assignment that demonstrates theabove, alongside analytical skills and the ability to deploy appropriate terminology.

  • Music in Gaming (MUSI273)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an overview of technological development and a basic (non-technical) appreciation of how sound and music are generated via gaming software/hardware; and to understand the role of the former in determining compositional design across different 'generations' of gaming hardware.

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between music and gaming contexts (eg genre, narrative function, immersion, emotion, and character portrayal).

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between game-music and other forms of music (eg orchestral styles, film music, popular music in compiled tracks).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of gaming hardware/software and the extent to which this determines, by limiting or affording, the incorporation of sound/music.

    (LO2) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between music in gaming and other gameplay factors (such as narrative, immersion, game-cues).

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate an awareness of broader critical, cultural, and ludomusicological issues, as presented and discussed in both historical and contemporary scholarship.

    (LO4) Students will be able to be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study examples.

    (S1) Communication skills.

    (S2) Research skills.

    (S3) Comprehension.

    (S4) Critical thinking.

    (S5) Writing skills.

    (S6) Applied skills.

    (S7) IT skills.

  • Psycholinguistics (ENGL202)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to explore questions concerning the relationship of language to consciousness. This will entail addressing questions concerning the nature of language in its evolutionary, acquisitional, developmental and degenerative stages, and the nature of human language as compared to non-human communication systems, such as those used by computers, apes, and other animals.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate awareness of the main issues in the psychology of language, and in the philosophy of mind in relation to language.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to give critical accounts of a range of human and non-human communication systems in their various stages of development.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate an awareness of the practical and ethical considerations which arise from engaging with human language in its various stages of development, and with non-human communication.

    (LO4) Students will be able to articulate 1-3 above in an appropriate academic style.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving

    (S3) Organisation

    (S4) Communication

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • The History of English: Variation and Change (ENGL221)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The main aims of the module are: to examine some of the most important developments in the history of English; to introduce students to some modern theories of language change and how they apply to the history of English; to introduce students to some basic research tools for the study of the history of English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate: A basic understanding of the main changes that the English language has undergone from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day.

    (LO2) An ability to critically evaluate modern published work on different aspects of the history of English.

    (LO3) An ability to work with historical corpora and on-line resources on the history of English.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

    (S2) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills.

    (S3) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.).

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning.

    (S7) Time and project management - Project management.

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

    (S9) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S10) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving.

  • Language in Society (ENGL276)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To make students aware of the interactive relationship between language and society. To familiarise students with variation in the use of language. To provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale sociolinguistic research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the social dimension of language and its implication for applied areas, including language education and policy.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts within the field of sociolinguistics.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of sociolinguistic methodology that allows students to collect language data and to analyse this data from a sociolinguistic perspective.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the scope of sociolinguistics in relation to other linguistic disciplines.

    (S1) Investigative skills: searching out and synthesising information stored on paper, electronically or visually; developing skills of independent investigation, interacting with colleagues

    (S2) Problem-solving skills: formulating problems (factual, empirical, theoretical) in precise terms, identifying key issues, developing the confidence to address challenging problems using a variety of different approaches

    (S3) Communication/ verbal skills: developing the ability to listen carefully, to present complex information in a clear, concise and sophisticated manner both in writing and by oral presentation, and to present a discussion based on information collected from various sources and coherently synthesised, using appropriate referencing conventions

    (S4) Thinking/ intellectual skills: developing the ability to interpret and present data, critically address complex ideas, construct logical arguments, and use technical language correctly

    (S5) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

    (S6) Self – development skills: developing the ability to work independently, to use their initiative, to organise their time properly and to interact constructively with others

    (S7) Information Technology: developing the ability to use their computing and IT skills to help find, store and interpret information, to produce electronic documents and to use appropriate software confidently

  • Child Language Acquisition (ENGL256)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:
    To make students aware of the scope, history, and the main findings of the field; to familiarise students with the most important theoretical and methodological issues in the area of child language acquisition; to give students the opportunity to cirtically reflect upon the representation of child language research in popular media; and to provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale (corpus-based) research in the area of child language acquisition.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of both the scope of child language acquisition in relation to other linguistic disciplines and some of the major findings within the field

    (LO2) Demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts and different methodological approaches within the field of CLA

    (LO3) Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect upon the way in which CLA findings are made available to a lay audience via popular media

    (LO4) Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of relevant methodology that allows you to analyse corpus data from a CLA perspective

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions

    (S2) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S5) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S6) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

    (S7) Research management; developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, and applying ethics

    (S8) Self-management; readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, and readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Pragmatics (ENGL274)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module aims to enable students to understand and apply a range of pragmatic theories. Specifically, it clarifies, (as far as possible) the distinction between semantics and pragmatics in accounting for communicated meaning, and the range of ways in which pragmatic meaning has been explained. It encourages students to consider the relative merits of different pragmatics theories as analytical approaches to meaning in context. It introduces and discusses the implications of pragmatics for our understanding of the nature and use of language in a range of different 'real world' situations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will be able to analyse relevant linguistic data using a range of pragmatic frameworks.

    (LO2) Critically compare and evaluate different pragmatic theories in relation to this data.

    (LO3) Assess the insights that pragmatic theory can offer into a range of linguistic issues concerning the nature, acquisition and use of language.

    (S1) Knowledge and understanding of core theories of Pragmatics and how these relate to other areas of language study/work.

    (S2) Ability to critically evaluate core theories of Pragmatics.

    (S3) Ability to apply theories of Pragmatics to data.

    (S4) Effective academic writing and referencing.

    (S5) Effective, targeted linguistic research.

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Negotiation skills

  • Multilingualism in Society (ENGL279)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To introduce students to sociolinguistic and ethnographic approaches to the study of multilingualism; to cultivate an understanding of how multiple languages are managed in society; and to develop critical understanding of the differentiated evaluation and use of multilingual varieties.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a good understanding of the major theoretical concepts in the study of multilingualism

    (LO2) Be able to discuss with insights some of the main ways multilingualism is studied

    (LO3) Have a clear understanding of the management, evaluation, and use of multiple languages in society

    (LO4) Be able to apply relevant theoretical concepts and research methods to the analysis of multilingualism as observed in everyday life

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Critical thinking

    (S5) Project management

  • Psycholinguistics 2 (ENGL283)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to explore questions concerning the relationship of language to consciousness. This will entail addressing questions concerning the nature of language in its evolutionary, acquisitional, developmental and degenerative stages, and the nature of human language as compared to non-human communication systems, such as those used by computers, apes, and other animals.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate awareness of the main issues in the psychology of language, and in the philosophy of mind in relation to language.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate ability to give critical accounts of a range of human and non-human communication systems in their various stages of development.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate awareness of the practical and ethical considerations which arise from engaging with human language in its various stages of development, and with non-human communication.

    (LO4) Students will be able to articulate LO1-LO3 above in an appropriate academic style.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving

    (S3) Organisation

    (S4) Communication

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • The English Language Across Time: Variation and Change (ENGL284)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The main aims of the module are: To examine some of the most important language developments in the history of English. To introduce students to some modern theories of language change and how they account for the developments mentioned in (1). To develop students' ability to analyse critically processes of language change. To familiarise students with some research tools for the study of the history of English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate: A basic understanding of some of the main changes that the English language has undergone through time and how they relate to modern theories of language change.

    (LO2) An ability to critically analyse (historical) texts concerned with selected aspects of the history of English.

    (LO3) An ability to use selected on-line resources and databases to study particular aspects of the history of English.

    (S1) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

  • Language in Society 2 (ENGL282)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To make students aware of the interactive relationship between language and society. To familiarise students with variation in the use of language. To provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale sociolinguistic research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate some understanding of the scope of sociolinguistics in relation to other linguistic disciplines.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate some knowledge and understanding of the social dimension of language and its implication for applied areas, including language education and policy.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts within the field of sociolinguistics.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of sociolinguistic methodology.

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • First Language Acquisition (ENGL246)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of this module are: To make students aware of the scope, history, and the main findings of the field; To familiarise students with the most important theoretical and methodological issues in the area of child language acquisition; To give students the opportunity to cirtically reflect upon the representation of child language research in popular media.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of both the scope of child language acquisition in relation to other linguistic disciplines and some of the major findings within the field

    (LO2) Demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts and different methodological approaches within the field of CLA

    (LO3) Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect upon the way in which CLA findings are made available to a lay audience via popular media

    (LO4) Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of relevant methodology that is relevant for corpus-studies from a CLA perspective

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions

    (S2) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S5) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S6) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

    (S7) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Pragmatics 2 (ENGL281)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module aims to enable students to understand and apply a range of pragmatic theories. Specifically, it clarifies, (as far as possible) the distinction between semantics and pragmatics in accounting for communicated meaning, and the range of ways in which pragmatic meaning has been explained. It encourages students to consider the relative merits of different pragmatics theories as analytical approaches to meaning in context. It introduces and discusses the implications of pragmatics for our understanding of the nature and use of language in a range of different 'real world' situations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will be able to analyse relevant linguistic data using a range of pragmatic frameworks.

    (LO2) Critically compare and evaluate different pragmatic theories in relation to this data.

    (LO3) Assess the insights that pragmatic theory can offer into a range of linguistic issues concerning the nature, acquisition and use of language.

    (S1) Knowledge and understanding of core theories of Pragmatics and how these relate to other areas.

    (S2) Ability to critically evaluate core theories of Pragmatics.

    (S3) Ability to apply theories of Pragmatics to data.

    (S4) Effective academic writing and referencing.

    (S5) Effective, targeted linguistic research.

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Negotiation skills

  • Multilingualism in Society 2 (ENGL292)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce students to sociolinguistic and ethnographic approaches to the study of multilingualism. To cultivate an understanding of how multiple languages are managed in society. To develop critical understanding of the differentiated evaluation and use of multilingual varieties.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate some understanding of the major theoretical concepts in the study of multilingualism.

    (LO2) Be able to discuss some of the main ways multilingualism is studied.

    (LO3) Have a basic understanding of the management, evaluation, and use of multiple languages in society.

    (LO4) Be able to apply relevant theoretical concepts and research methods to the analysis of multilingualism as observed in everday life.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) International awareness

    (S5) Ethical awareness

Programme Year Three

You will take two compulsory modules. The rest of your modules will be taken from English Language, although you may also have options from other contributing Departments.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Philosophy of Play and the VIrtual (PHIL343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the main contemporary issues around play and games. To develop students understanding of the relationships between play, labour and virtuality. To enable students to reflect on their own preconceptions of play and value.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain the importance of play as a topic for study.

    (LO2) Students will be able to analyse common topics of discourse around play and games, especially digital games: violence, addiction, therapeutic and educational effects, and gamification.

    (LO3) Students will be able to identify philosophical issues arising from specific games/instances of play.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain some of the philosophical literature around play, make-believe, choice and responsibility, and virtual worlds.

    (LO5) Students will be able to trace connections between surface controversies and deeper philosophical concerns.

    (LO6) Students will develop their ability to reflect on their own preconceptions and how these contribute to both philosophical and popular discourse.

    (S1) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify unifying philosophical issues in everyday discussions and mass-media environments.

    (S3) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to identify their own presumptions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, use and reference academic sources, and to plan, organise and produce presentations and essays.

    (S7) Students will enhance their oral and written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S10) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, including online sources, video and screen capture and editing, and visual presentation aids.

  • History of Academic Game Studies (SOTA302)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the key themes of academic game studies. To enable students to develop skills in analysing and criticising academic work on games. T o develop students' ability formulate and present arguments that relate academic theory to contemporary structures and conventions of games culture and industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to critically engage with academic theorising about games in relation to the actual business, design and consumption of games.

    (LO2) Students should be able to deploy fundamental concepts of game studies such as the magic circle, ludus and paidia, agon, alea, mimicry and vertigo etc.

    (LO3) Students should be able to break down particular industrial, cultural and historical contexts to show how these influenced the formation of key movements in academic game studies, especially ludology.

    (LO4) Students should be able draw historical connections between different periods and movements in the study of games.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S4) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop the ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include (to professional standard) citations and bibliographies in their work and to plan, organise and produce essays.

    (S7) Students will enhance their written communications skills and develop skill in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

    (S8) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S9) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of information.

    (S10) Students will develop their skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the World Wide Web and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Dissertation (semester One) (ENGL311)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them.

    To build on students' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Work independently.

    (LO2) Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

    (LO3) Construct an original argument, to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

    (LO4) Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

    (LO5) Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

    (LO6) Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

    (S1) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

    (S2) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Time and project management - Project management

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S10) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

  • Language and the Law: A Course in Forensic Linguistics (ENGL312)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
    Aims

    Practical in orientation, this module develops a set of methods for examining the links between language and the law in all its forms. The activities listed below reflect a consensus across the published literature in the field and therefore reflect the main duties a forensic linguist can expect to perform. Such activities include: Performing expert analysis and commentary on the language of legal documents, courts and prisons. Improving translation services in the court system. Helping alleviate [linguistic] disadvantage produced by the legal process. Providing forensic evidence that is based on professional academic knowledge of language and discourse. Offering advice in legal drafting and interpreting, often with an emphasis on the use of 'plain language'. Overall, the course promotes the use of forensic evidence that is based on the best expertise in the study of language and linguistics. It is an avowed aim of the International Association of Forensic Linguists (IAFL) that forensic linguistics should seek to alleviate language-based inequality and disadvantage in the legal system, and this module embraces this aim.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to:Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the scope and history of forensic linguistics.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to apply a range of models in language and discourse to forensic materials, whether those materials be spoken or written.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an ability to balance probabilities in linguistic evidence using quantitative data and with reference linguistic corpora.

    (LO4) Demonstrate an understanding of the constraints on language use and understanding in the legal process, with particular reference to social and cultural difference.

    (S1) Students will acquire skills in close linguistic analysis, of both spoken and written language, with particular skill in forensic document analysis.

    (S2) Students will be able to match different theoretical models with different kinds of forensic data.

    (S3) Students will be able to perform expert analysis and commentary on the language of legal documents, courts and prisons.

    (S4) Students will be trained to offer reasoned forensic-linguistic evidence that is gounded in academic knowledge of language and discourse.

  • Language and the Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (ENGL342)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop a critical understanding of the theories and concepts in Cognitive Linguistics and their application to neighbouring fields.

    To gain the ability to analyse language (sentence/text) with Cognitive Linguistics “tools” and methods.

    Learning Outcomes

     Demonstrate knowledge of the field of Cognitive Linguistics in its historical development.

     Demonstrate a critical understanding of the basic concepts of Cognitive Linguistics.

     Apply a range of Cognitive Linguistics models and methods to a variety of texts.

     Demonstrate the ability to produce informed and critical library research.

    ​Demonstrate fluency and rigour in oral presentations in the field of Cognitive Linguistics.

    ​Demonstrate academic writing skills.

  • Language and Literature (ENGL383)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts. To introduce you to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts. To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches. To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Your analytical skills will be sharpened.

    (LO2) Your knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened.

    (LO3) You will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Language and Globalization (ENGL430)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    Students learn to appreciate the often unexpected and complex ways language and communication are involved in the globalization process. Sociolinguistic concepts are used in creative ways to achieve innovative understandings of varied social phenomena under globalization.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop a critical understanding of the impact of globalization on language and communication.

    (LO2) Students will be able to discuss insightfully some of the ways to examine language and globalization.

    (LO3) Students will be able to examine and explain in innovative ways the use and functionality of language in global contexts.

    (LO4) Students will critically reflect on new forms of power and social relations in globalization.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Teamwork.

    (S3) Communication skills.

    (S4) International awareness.

    (S5) Critical thinking.

  • Introduction to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages in A Global Context (ENGL303)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
    Aims

    The module aims:
    • to provide students with an introduction to the principles and practice of teaching English to speakers of other languages;
    • to help prepare students with little or no teaching experience to teach English to speakers of other languages in the private or voluntary sectors or while travelling abroad.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of how theoretical assumptions about language and language learning inform the current practice of TESOL.

    (LO2) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of the role of English language teaching in a global context, including the economic, cultural, and social implications of teaching English as a global language.

    (LO3) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of different career paths available in the field of TESOL.

    (LO4) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with practical techniques for teaching aspects of the English language system such as grammar and vocabulary.

    (LO5) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with practical classroom techniques for teaching receptive and productive skills and practical details of lesson planning.

    (LO6) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to apply knowledge of theories of language and language learning to the investigation of classroom-related issues and problems.

    (LO7) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to apply digital technology to language learning issues through corpora and online resources.

    (LO8) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to construct a cogent written argument in the form of a written assignment, based upon a range of reference sources.

    (LO9) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to conceive, plan and deliver a short lesson on one aspect of English language to learners.

    (S1) Identifying target language for a class: how instruction can influence acquisition.

    (S2) Lesson planning; scope and sequence of classroom activities in class.

    (S3) Classroom management: giving clear instructions and comprehension checking.

    (S4) Interpersonal communication: developing awareness of how teachers model the language, interact with their students, and give feedback.

    (S5) Confidence: taking charge of a learning situation, setting and achieving goals, and reflecting on performance.

  • Analysing Discourse (ENGL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to equip students with a knowledge of how discourse works at linguistic, metalinguistic, and paralinguistic levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of discourse types and will learn methodologies (and their theoretical bases) available for analysing them, especially with a view to exposing meanings which would otherwise remain hidden.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have the ability to understand the theoretical principles behind discourse analysis.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to identify a broad range of discourse types.

    (LO3) Students will have the ability to collect discourse data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodology.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to understand the implicit or concealed ideology that motivates discourse.

    (S1) Discourse analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • Varieties of Northern English (ENGL308)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with varieties of Northern English in relation to Modern Standard English and other non-standard varieties.
    2. To raise student critical awareness of language variation.
    3. To equip students with the theoretical and technological tools that will enable them to conduct their own case study and present, analyse, and discuss original data they collect themselves.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a critical understanding of varieties of Northern English in relation to Standard English and other non-standard varieties of English.

    (LO2) Detect and identify the distinctive features of the varieties of Northern English

    (LO3) Construct a corpus of Northern dialect language data and conduct both quantitative and qualitative analyses of corpus data.

    (LO4) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, geographical, social and theoretical factors surrounding varieties of Northern English.

    (LO5) Acquire and demonstrate skills using specialist software used in the field.

    (S1) Time and project management - Personal action planning

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • Language and Gender (ENGL400)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to language and gender.
    2. To develop students' critical understanding of current theories of language and gender as well as their ability to apply these in real data and real-life situations.
    3. To enhance students' awareness in the role of language in constructing gender.
    4. To provide students with experience in conducting their own empirical study in an area of language and gender.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main schools of thought within the field of language and gender and the methodologies used in this line of research.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to comment critically on the major studies within the field.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to analyse data drawing upon the relevant theoretical concept and apply standards data analysis techniques and background concepts to new data.

    (S1) Problem-solving skills: formulating problems (factual, empirical, theoretical) in precise terms, identifying key issues, developing the confidence to address challenging problems using a variety of different approaches

    (S2) Investigative skills: searching out and synthesising information stored on paper, electronically or visually; developing skills of independent investigation, interacting with colleagues

    (S3) Communication/ verbal: developing the ability to listen carefully, to present complex information in a clear, concise and sophisticated manner both in writing and by oral presentation, and to present a discussion based on information collected from various sources and coherently synthesised, using appropriate referencing conventions

    (S4) Thinking/ intellectual skills: developing the ability to interpret and present data, critically address complex ideas, construct logical arguments, and use technical language correctly

    (S5) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

    (S6) Self – development skills: developing the ability to work independently, to use their initiative, to organise their time properly and to interact constructively with others

    (S7) Information Technology: developing the ability to use their computing and IT skills to help find, store and interpret information, to produce electronic documents and to use appropriate software confidently

  • Dissertation (semester Two) (ENGL379)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them. To build on students' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

    (LO2) Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

    (LO3) Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

    (LO4) Construct an original argument to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

    (LO5) Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

    (LO6) Work independently.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - Project management

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S9) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

  • Dissertation (over Both Semesters) (ENGL380)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them. To build on students' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

    (LO2) Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

    (LO3) Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

    (LO4) Construct an original argument to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

    (LO5) Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

    (LO6) Work independently.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - Project management

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S9) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

  • Language and the Mind 2: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (ENGL344)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To develop a critical understanding of the theories and concepts in Cognitive Linguistics and their application to neighbouring fields.

    To gain the ability to analyse language (sentence/text) with Cognitive Linguistics “tools” and methods
    Learning OutcomesDemonstrate knowledge of the field of Cognitive Linguistics in its historical development. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the basic concepts of Cognitive Linguistics.

    ​Apply a range of models and methods to the analysis of language based on key notions related to cognition.

    ​Master the discourse (“jargon”) of Cognitive Linguistics.

  • Language and Literature 2 (ENGL385)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts.
    To introduce students to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts.
    To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches.
    To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students analytical skills will be sharpened.

    (LO2) Students knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened.

    (LO3) Students will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Adaptability

  • Language and Globalization 2 (ENGL410)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    Learn to appreciate the often unexpected and complex ways language and communication are involved in the globalization process; use sociolinguistic concepts in creative ways to achieve innovative understandings of varied social phenomena under globalization.      

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop a basic understanding of the impact of globalization on language and communication.

    (LO2) Students will be able to discuss some of the ways to examine language and globalization.

    (LO3) Students will be able to examine and explain the use and functionality of language in global contexts.

    (LO4) Students will reflect on new forms of power and social relations in globalization.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) International awareness

  • Varieties of Northern English 2 (ENGL324)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with varieties of Northern English in relation to Modern Standard English and other non-standard varieties.
    2. To raise student critical awareness of language variation.
    3. To equip students with the theoretical and technological tools that will enable them to conduct their own case study and present, analyse, and discuss original data they collect themselves.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a critical understanding of varieties of Northern English in relation to Standard English and other non-standard varieties of English.

    (LO2) Detect and identify the distinctive features of the varieties of Northern English.

    (LO3) Construct a corpus of Northern dialect language data and conduct both quantitative and qualitative analyses of corpus data.

    (LO4) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, geographical, social and theoretical factors surrounding varieties of Northern English.

    (LO5) Acquire and demonstrate skills using specialist software used in the field.

    (S1) Time and project management - Personal action planning

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • Analysing Discourse 2 (ENGL370)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to equip students with a knowledge of how discourse works at linguistic, metalinguistic, and paralinguistic levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of discourse types and will learn methodologies (and their theoretical bases) available for analysing them, especially with a view to exposing meanings which would otherwise remain hidden.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain the ability to understand the theoretical principles behind discourse analysis.

    (LO2) Students will be able to identify a range of discourse types.

    (LO3) Students will gain the ability to collect discourse data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodology.

    (LO4) Students will gain the ability to understand the implicit or concealed ideology that motivates discourse.

    (S1) Discourse analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • Language and Gender 2 (ENGL402)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with past and current theoretical and methodological app roaches to language and gender.

    2. To develop students' critical understanding of current theories of language and gender as well as their ability to apply these in real data and real-life situations

    3. To enhance students' awareness in the role of language in constructing gender.

    4. To provide students with experience in conducting their own empirical study in an area of language and gender.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of some of the main schools of thought in the field of langauge and gender, and the methodologies used in this line of research.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to comment on the major studies within the field.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to analyse data drawing upon some relevant theoretical concepts and apply standards data analysis techniques and background concepts to new data.

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning.

    (S2) Literacy.

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity.

  • School of the Arts Work Placements Module (SOTA300)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context. To apply within that practical or vocational context professional, pedagogical, theoretical and other knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of the placement materials and/or tasks. To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context, and reflect and report on the relationship between the two. To develop and identify a range of personal/ employability skills, and reflect and report on this development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    (LO2) To reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) To identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) To identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

    (S1) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will experience a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, with no modules being taught entirely through lectures. Alongside independent study and research, some modules require timetabled student group work. We provide an online programme of study skills to help with the necessary standards of referencing and presentation in written work. Tutorials allow for discussion of key readings, concepts and ideas, typically in groups of up to nine students.
Seminar groups are larger, but do not normally exceed 18; they usually last for between one and a half to two hours. Workshops are similar in size but have a more distinct practical element (eg in drama or language modules). In addition, in Years Two and Three, you will participate to a greater or lesser extent in a range of other formative activities: seminar presentations, creative writing and peer teaching.


Assessment

The main modes of assessment are through a combination of essay and examination, but depending on the modules taken you may encounter project work, presentations (individual or group), and portfolios of creative work or specific tests focused on editing, translation or etymological tasks.