English Language BA (Hons)

Key information


english-3

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we're changing how the course is delivered.

Students must take modules amounting to 120 credits per year.

Programme Year One

You will take four compulsory modules, and choose two options.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Attitudes to English (ENGL106)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To gain an understanding of:
    • what is an ‘attitude’ towards language and how it arises in a particular socio-cultural context;
    • some of the most important ideological trends that have shaped speakers’ attitudes to language use in a variety of geographical, socio-cultural and political domains in the history of English (1300-present);
    • the social and cultural consequences of ‘having an attitude’ towards language use;
    • the ‘discourses’ through which language attitudes are expressed, both nationally and internationally.

    To acquire specialist knowledge of:
    • selected frameworks and methodologies that researchers typically use to explore attitudes to language;
    • appropriate protocols and procedures to develop students’ own attitudinal studies.

    To develop students’ confidence by encouraging them to:
    • examine historical and contemporary texts/language samples in an informed and critical manner;
    • collect their own ‘attitudinal’ data;
    • apply the socio-historical concepts, theories and methodologies seen in class to real-life language examples and situations both within and outside the UK context
    • actively reflect on how the practices, protocols and methods seen in the module are transferable to the work-place.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of:
    The ability to analyse and interpret data and sophisticated texts closely and critically

    (LO2) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with:
    The ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms

    (LO3) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to:
    The ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology

    (S1) Application of IT and numeracy

    (S2) Critical thinking

    (S3) Complex problem solving

    (S4) Data handling

    (S5) Intellectual ability

  • English Language in Context (ENGL116)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:

    To equip students with key concepts in basic linguistic analysis.

    To introduce students to the importance of context in shaping language.

    To raise student awareness of the communicative purposes served through language use.

    To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to analyse and interpret a wide range of language data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a clear intake of key concepts in basic linguistic analysis.

    (LO2) Use technical vocabulary accurately.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a clear understanding of the importance of context in shaping language.

    (LO4) Exhibit knowledge and understanding of the communicative functions of language.

    (LO5) Appreciate the different ways of studying the English language.

    (LO6) Analyse and interpret a range of naturally occurring data.

    (LO7) Demonstrate familiarity with digital resources for language analysis.

    (LO8) The ability to analyse and interpret data and sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (LO9) The ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (LO10) The ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S1) Read closely and critically.

    (S2) Write clearly, accurately and effectively.

    (S3) Apply scholarly bibliographic skills appropriate to the subject.

    (S4) Present information within wider contexts.

    (S5) Plan, organise and report to deadline.

    (S6) Articulate their own and other people’s ideas concisely, accurately and persuasively both orally and in writing.

    (S7) Develop working relationships with others in teams, especially through constructive dialogue (for example, by listening, asking and responding to questions).

    (S8) Be sensitive to cultural contexts when working with others.

    (S9) Applying creativity and rigour to problem-solving, adapting to different demands and tasks.

  • Introduction to Language Study (ENGL107)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with specialist skills in the linguistic analysis of language data which will enable students to identify and describe examples of linguistic variation in English. Students will develop specialist skills allowing them to select the correct phonetic symbols (from the International Phonetic Alphabet) and linguistic terminology when discussing linguistic phenomena. The module seeks to embody an approach to learning that empowers students to discuss linguistic variation in relation to relevant and appropriate scholarly work and to recognise the expressive resources of language. Students will develop subject-specific knowledge that will allow them to explain how relevant theoretical concepts (topical and ethical) apply to real language data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

  • Introduction to Stylistics (ENGL105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module has several aims. In the first instance, the module seeks to introduce students to the study of literary linguistics (also known as stylistics). Secondly, it aims to familiarise students with several key ideas in language study. Thirdly, it equips students to understand and explain how language works in a wide range of texts. The fourth and final aim of the module is to provide students with the tools to analyse literary texts (in the broadest sense of the phrase) in a precise and rigorous manner.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will have an awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (S1) Students will have the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically

    (S2) Students will have the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms

    (S3) Students will have the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology

Year One Optional Modules

  • Close Reading (ENGL103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To foster and enhance the skills of close reading by drawing attention to what is needed for close literary analysis of texts. To read texts attentively and to acquire appropriate vocabulary and techniques for successful close reading and to consider the implications of literary devices and techniques when both writing and reading literary texts. To enable students to criticise and write focused critical essays on the basis of their attentive reading, to discuss matters such as form, structure, voice and genre with confidence and using appropriate vocabulary. To expand our understanding and appreciation of texts and to consider the implications of using categories such as genre, structure, voice and form when analysing and discussing text.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students of this module will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) By the end of the module, student should be able to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) This module will engender awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (S1) The module equips students to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students undertaking this module will learn to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) The module seeks to provide students with the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

  • Ways of Reading (ENGL113)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    1. To allow students to consider the ways in which we read and write about literary texts in different contexts (political, historical, theoretical and aesthetic).

    2. To encourage students to consider how different methods of reading and interpretation improve understanding and analysis of literary texts.

    3. To introduce students to critical issues related the creation and reception of literary texts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will understand and apply critical, cultural and literary theory.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to make use of digital media to present ideas.

  • Critical, Analytical and Creative Thinking (PHIL112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To introduce students to the concepts and methods of informal logic and to enable students to use these concepts and methods in assessing arguments both within and outside philosophy. To help students to think more logically themselves, and to locate and remove inconsistencies in their own thoughts. To introduce students to methods of causal, statistical and probabilistic reasoning and to enable students to identify and avoid causal, statistical and probabilistic fallacies. To enable students to think creatively about problems and to come up with rational solutions to them, and to make logical decisions in the light of available evidence.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will able to explain and apply the basic concepts of logic.

    (LO2) Students will be able to identify conclusions and premises in arguments, including hidden premises.

    (LO3) Students will be able to reconstruct and evaluate arguments.

    (LO4) Students will be able to distinguish between reasoning and rhetoric and to identify fallacies and rhetorical ploys in arguments.

    (LO5) Students will be able to distinguish between deductive and inductive inference, including distinguishing between different types of inductive inference, enumerative, statistical, causal, analogical.

    (LO6) Students will be able to tell when a given set of statements is logically consistent and when it is not.

    (LO7) Students will be able to explain some of the problems with relativism about truth.

    (LO8) Students will be able to explain and apply some of the basic principles of statistics and of probability theory.

    (LO9) Students will be able to demonstrate creative thinking by spotting possibilities missed by less creative thinkers.

    (S1) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to identify the issues that underlie debates.

    (S4) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches, and their ability to identify presuppositions and to reflect critically upon them.

    (S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S6) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S7) Students will develop their ability to sift through information, assessing the relevance and importance of the information to what is at issue.

    (S8) Students will develop their problem-solving skills.

    (S9) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, in a dispassionate and respectful manner, in debates about controversial and profound matters.

    (S10) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and those of others.

    (S11) Communication; oral, written and visual. Influencing skills, argumentation.

    (S12) Critical thinking and problem solving; critical analysis

    (S13) Critical thinking and problem solving; creative thinking.

    (S14) Information skills; critical reading.

    (S15) Information skills; evaluation.

    (S16) Numeracy and computational skills. Reason with numbers and mathematical concepts.

    (S17) Numeracy and computational skills; problem solving.

  • Analysing Media Texts (COMM105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will introduce you to the analysis of communication and the forms that communication takes i.e., how meaning is created through words, images and sounds, focusing primarily on popular screen media, especially film and television.

    This module will also introduce some major approaches to media analysis, focusing especially on narrative, stylistic and genre analysis.

    This module will also examine the ways in which media communication takes place within a number of contexts, paying particular attention to industrial and economic concerns, the ways in which audiences engage with media and the ways in which media are authored and branded.

    This is one of two foundational modules for students seeking to study Communications in years 2 and 3. It is compulsory for everyone except for students doing a minor in Communication.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the role still and moving images play in mass communications along with the ideological implications they have for media messages.

    (LO2) Develop an analytic ability in relation to different kinds of media texts, with particular reference to their narrative, stylistic and generic dimensions.

    (LO3) Understand the ways in which narrative, stylistic and generic choices shape the nature of representation in media texts.

    (LO4) Identify media texts as products of particular economic, industrial, institutional and technological environments.

    (LO5) Understand the most significant components of media texts and the production practices that underlie them, and to analyse these aspects critically.

    (S1) Communication skills.

    (S2) IT Skills.

    (S3) Commercial awareness.

    (S4) Communication (listening and questioning and respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing presentations).

    (S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity (analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions)

    (S6) Self-management, readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning.

  • Introduction to Logic (PHIL127)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce students to the concepts, language and methods of classical sentential logic. To introduce students to a language of classical quantificational logic.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to explain and apply the basic concepts of classical sentence logic.

    (LO2) Students will be able to translate from English into sentence logic and vice versa.

    (LO3) Students will be able to construct and use truth tables.

    (LO4) Students will be able to construct proofs in natural deduction for sentence logic.

    (LO5) Students will be able to translate from English into quantificational logic and vice versa.

    (S1) Students will enhance their abilities in reading and understanding texts and in comprehending abstract material.

    (S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

    (S3) Students will enhance their ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

    (S4) Students will develop their ability to work independently.

    (S5) Students will develop their problem-solving skills.

    (S6) Improving own learning and performance; personal action planning.

    (S7) Communication; oral, written and visual; listening skills.

    (S8) Communication oral, written and visual, following instructions, protocols and procedures.

    (S9) Communication oral, written and visual, influencing skills and argumentation.

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities; resilience.

  • Media and Society (COMM108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of the relationships between media, politics and society and the ways in which we use media and media use us.

    To develop an understanding of some of the key concepts and theories which seek to explain the communication and mediatisation of public and political life.

    To develop an understanding of the ways in which media operations and news discourse affect the representation of issues such as ethnicity, nationalism, gender, war and terrorism.

    To explore the ways in which the public are becoming both consumers and producers of media texts as well as their subjects, and the implications of new technologies and social media on everyday politics and social life.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to discuss the role the media play in democratic societies.

    (LO2) Students will be able to identify key theories and debates concerning journalistic practices, including what makes news and issues of objectivity, bias and framing.

    (LO3) Students will be able to discuss the role media representations play in generating public perceptions of and responses to significant issues in society.

    (LO4) Students will be able to analyse the ways in which new media technologies are transforming relationships between the public, media and those whom the media depict.

    (LO5) Students will be able to summarise evidence from a range of sources and present well-structured arguments.

    (S1) Proficient use of electronic resources and tools for research as specified and required.

    (S2) Time management, organisation of work, proficient use of English, referencing.

    (S3) Ability to construct and convey a coherent argument in written form.

    (S4) Ability to analyse theories and concepts and apply knowledge.

  • Language and Media (COMM151)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to/seeks to provide students with skills for analysing the linguistic aspects of media texts whilst developing their understanding of other communicative modes in relation to language proper. It will provide a foundation for students to undertake more advanced topics in subsequent modules. It will also create opportunities for specific kinds of Independent Project or Dissertation in the final year of the programme, with a linguistic focus.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learn to identify similarities as well as differences between language modes literally understood and 'language' understood metaphorically when applied to other communicative systems.

    (LO2) Learn to apply linguistically-derived concepts to a range of media texts.

    (LO3) Develop an understanding of theoretical issues within which the study of media language may have a part to play.

    (LO4) Work with other students in a group situation to identify and discuss important communicative/linguistic features in a collectively chosen media text.

    (S1) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

Programme Year Two

Your second year is composed entirely of optional modules, which cover the major theoretical, historical and sociocultural approaches to the study of the English language. You will work closely with academic specialists to develop your knowledge of key concepts and your skills of independent study.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Language in Society (ENGL276)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To make students aware of the interactive relationship between language and society. To familiarise students with variation in the use of language. To provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale sociolinguistic research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the social dimension of language and its implication for applied areas, including language education and policy.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts within the field of sociolinguistics.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of sociolinguistic methodology that allows students to collect language data and to analyse this data from a sociolinguistic perspective.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the scope of sociolinguistics in relation to other linguistic disciplines.

    (S1) Investigative skills: searching out and synthesising information stored on paper, electronically or visually; developing skills of independent investigation, interacting with colleagues

    (S2) Problem-solving skills: formulating problems (factual, empirical, theoretical) in precise terms, identifying key issues, developing the confidence to address challenging problems using a variety of different approaches

    (S3) Communication/ verbal skills: developing the ability to listen carefully, to present complex information in a clear, concise and sophisticated manner both in writing and by oral presentation, and to present a discussion based on information collected from various sources and coherently synthesised, using appropriate referencing conventions

    (S4) Thinking/ intellectual skills: developing the ability to interpret and present data, critically address complex ideas, construct logical arguments, and use technical language correctly

    (S5) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

    (S6) Self – development skills: developing the ability to work independently, to use their initiative, to organise their time properly and to interact constructively with others

    (S7) Information Technology: developing the ability to use their computing and IT skills to help find, store and interpret information, to produce electronic documents and to use appropriate software confidently

  • Pragmatics (ENGL274)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module aims to enable students to understand and apply a range of pragmatic theories. Specifically, it clarifies, (as far as possible) the distinction between semantics and pragmatics in accounting for communicated meaning, and the range of ways in which pragmatic meaning has been explained. It encourages students to consider the relative merits of different pragmatics theories as analytical approaches to meaning in context. It introduces and discusses the implications of pragmatics for our understanding of the nature and use of language in a range of different 'real world' situations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will be able to analyse relevant linguistic data using a range of pragmatic frameworks.

    (LO2) Critically compare and evaluate different pragmatic theories in relation to this data.

    (LO3) Assess the insights that pragmatic theory can offer into a range of linguistic issues concerning the nature, acquisition and use of language.

    (S1) Knowledge and understanding of core theories of Pragmatics and how these relate to other areas of language study/work.

    (S2) Ability to critically evaluate core theories of Pragmatics.

    (S3) Ability to apply theories of Pragmatics to data.

    (S4) Effective academic writing and referencing.

    (S5) Effective, targeted linguistic research.

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Negotiation skills

  • Psycholinguistics (ENGL202)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to explore questions concerning the relationship of language to consciousness. This will entail addressing questions concerning the nature of language in its evolutionary, acquisitional, developmental and degenerative stages, and the nature of human language as compared to non-human communication systems, such as those used by computers, apes, and other animals.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate awareness of the main issues in the psychology of language, and in the philosophy of mind in relation to language.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to give critical accounts of a range of human and non-human communication systems in their various stages of development.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate an awareness of the practical and ethical considerations which arise from engaging with human language in its various stages of development, and with non-human communication.

    (LO4) Students will be able to articulate 1-3 above in an appropriate academic style.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving

    (S3) Organisation

    (S4) Communication

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • The History of English: Variation and Change (ENGL221)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    The main aims of the module are: to examine some of the most important developments in the history of English; to introduce students to some modern theories of language change and how they apply to the history of English; to introduce students to some basic research tools for the study of the history of English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate: A basic understanding of the main changes that the English language has undergone from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day.

    (LO2) An ability to critically evaluate modern published work on different aspects of the history of English.

    (LO3) An ability to work with historical corpora and on-line resources on the history of English.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

    (S2) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills.

    (S3) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.).

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning.

    (S7) Time and project management - Project management.

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

    (S9) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S10) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving.

  • Child Language Acquisition (ENGL256)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:
    To make students aware of the scope, history, and the main findings of the field; to familiarise students with the most important theoretical and methodological issues in the area of child language acquisition; to give students the opportunity to critically reflect upon the representation of child language research in popular media; and to provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale (corpus-based) research in the area of child language acquisition.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of both the scope of child language acquisition in relation to other linguistic disciplines and some of the major findings within the field

    (LO2) Demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts and different methodological approaches within the field of CLA

    (LO3) Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect upon the way in which CLA findings are made available to a lay audience via popular media

    (LO4) Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of relevant methodology that allows you to analyse corpus data from a CLA perspective

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions

    (S2) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S5) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S6) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

    (S7) Research management; developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, and applying ethics

    (S8) Self-management; readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, and readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Multilingualism in Society (ENGL279)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
    Aims

    To introduce students to sociolinguistic and ethnographic approaches to the study of multilingualism; to cultivate an understanding of how multiple languages are managed in society; and to develop critical understanding of the differentiated evaluation and use of multilingual varieties.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a good understanding of the major theoretical concepts in the study of multilingualism

    (LO2) Be able to discuss with insights some of the main ways multilingualism is studied

    (LO3) Have a clear understanding of the management, evaluation, and use of multiple languages in society

    (LO4) Be able to apply relevant theoretical concepts and research methods to the analysis of multilingualism as observed in everyday life

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Teamwork

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Critical thinking

    (S5) Project management

Programme Year Three

You will choose entirely optional modules, all of which are designed to allow greater specialisation and generic and/or thematic focus. Modules at this level will often reflect the current research of our academic staff and will allow you to explore the applications of language study in contexts such as education and the legal system. These modules will enable you to take part in debates about the current and future directions of the subject and enable you to develop your skills of independent research. Your options may include a dissertation on a subject of your choosing or a work placement with an organisation relevant to your degree.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Analysing Discourse (ENGL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to equip students with a knowledge of how discourse works at linguistic, metalinguistic, and paralinguistic levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of discourse types and will learn methodologies (and their theoretical bases) available for analysing them, especially with a view to exposing meanings which would otherwise remain hidden.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have the ability to understand the theoretical principles behind discourse analysis.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to identify a broad range of discourse types.

    (LO3) Students will have the ability to collect discourse data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodology.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to understand the implicit or concealed ideology that motivates discourse.

    (S1) Discourse analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • Introduction to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages in A Global Context (ENGL303)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
    Aims

    The module aims:
    • to provide students with an introduction to the principles and practice of teaching English to speakers of other languages;
    • to help prepare students with little or no teaching experience to teach English to speakers of other languages in the private or voluntary sectors or while travelling abroad.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of how theoretical assumptions about language and language learning inform the current practice of TESOL.

    (LO2) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of the role of English language teaching in a global context, including the economic, cultural, and social implications of teaching English as a global language.

    (LO3) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of different career paths available in the field of TESOL.

    (LO4) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with practical techniques for teaching aspects of the English language system such as grammar and vocabulary.

    (LO5) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with practical classroom techniques for teaching receptive and productive skills and practical details of lesson planning.

    (LO6) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to apply knowledge of theories of language and language learning to the investigation of classroom-related issues and problems.

    (LO7) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to apply digital technology to language learning issues through corpora and online resources.

    (LO8) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to construct a cogent written argument in the form of a written assignment, based upon a range of reference sources.

    (LO9) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to conceive, plan and deliver a short lesson on one aspect of English language to learners.

    (S1) Identifying target language for a class: how instruction can influence acquisition.

    (S2) Lesson planning; scope and sequence of classroom activities in class.

    (S3) Classroom management: giving clear instructions and comprehension checking.

    (S4) Interpersonal communication: developing awareness of how teachers model the language, interact with their students, and give feedback.

    (S5) Confidence: taking charge of a learning situation, setting and achieving goals, and reflecting on performance.

  • Language and Gender (ENGL400)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to language and gender.
    2. To develop students' critical understanding of current theories of language and gender as well as their ability to apply these in real data and real-life situations.
    3. To enhance students' awareness in the role of language in constructing gender.
    4. To provide students with experience in conducting their own empirical study in an area of language and gender.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main schools of thought within the field of language and gender and the methodologies used in this line of research.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to comment critically on the major studies within the field.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to analyse data drawing upon the relevant theoretical concept and apply standards data analysis techniques and background concepts to new data.

    (S1) Problem-solving skills: formulating problems (factual, empirical, theoretical) in precise terms, identifying key issues, developing the confidence to address challenging problems using a variety of different approaches

    (S2) Investigative skills: searching out and synthesising information stored on paper, electronically or visually; developing skills of independent investigation, interacting with colleagues

    (S3) Communication/ verbal: developing the ability to listen carefully, to present complex information in a clear, concise and sophisticated manner both in writing and by oral presentation, and to present a discussion based on information collected from various sources and coherently synthesised, using appropriate referencing conventions

    (S4) Thinking/ intellectual skills: developing the ability to interpret and present data, critically address complex ideas, construct logical arguments, and use technical language correctly

    (S5) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

    (S6) Self – development skills: developing the ability to work independently, to use their initiative, to organise their time properly and to interact constructively with others

    (S7) Information Technology: developing the ability to use their computing and IT skills to help find, store and interpret information, to produce electronic documents and to use appropriate software confidently

  • Language and Globalization (ENGL430)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    Students learn to appreciate the often unexpected and complex ways language and communication are involved in the globalization process. Sociolinguistic concepts are used in creative ways to achieve innovative understandings of varied social phenomena under globalization.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop a critical understanding of the impact of globalization on language and communication.

    (LO2) Students will be able to discuss insightfully some of the ways to examine language and globalization.

    (LO3) Students will be able to examine and explain in innovative ways the use and functionality of language in global contexts.

    (LO4) Students will critically reflect on new forms of power and social relations in globalization.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Teamwork.

    (S3) Communication skills.

    (S4) International awareness.

    (S5) Critical thinking.

  • Language and Literature (ENGL383)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts. To introduce you to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts. To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches. To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Your analytical skills will be sharpened.

    (LO2) Your knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened.

    (LO3) You will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • School of the Arts Work Placements Module (SOTA300)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context. To apply within that practical or vocational context professional, pedagogical, theoretical and other knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of the placement materials and/or tasks. To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context, and reflect and report on the relationship between the two. To develop and identify a range of personal/ employability skills, and reflect and report on this development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    (LO2) To reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) To identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) To identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

    (S1) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

  • Varieties of Northern English (ENGL308)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with varieties of Northern English in relation to Modern Standard English and other non-standard varieties.
    2. To raise students' critical awareness of language variation.
    3. To equip students with the theoretical and technological tools that will enable them to conduct their own case study and present, analyse, and discuss original data they collect themselves.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a critical understanding of varieties of Northern English in relation to Standard English and other non-standard varieties of English.

    (LO2) Detect and identify the distinctive features of the varieties of Northern English

    (LO3) Construct a corpus of Northern dialect language data and conduct both quantitative and qualitative analyses of corpus data.

    (LO4) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, geographical, social and theoretical factors surrounding varieties of Northern English.

    (LO5) Acquire and demonstrate skills using specialist software used in the field.

    (S1) Time and project management - Personal action planning

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • Dissertation (semester One) (ENGL311)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them.

    To build on students' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Work independently.

    (LO2) Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

    (LO3) Construct an original argument, to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

    (LO4) Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

    (LO5) Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

    (LO6) Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

    (S1) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

    (S2) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Time and project management - Project management

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S10) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

  • Language and the Law: A Course in Forensic Linguistics (ENGL312)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
    Aims

    Practical in orientation, this module develops a set of methods for examining the links between language and the law in all its forms. The activities listed below reflect a consensus across the published literature in the field and therefore reflect the main duties a forensic linguist can expect to perform. Such activities include:

    • Performing expert analysis and commentary on the language of legal documents, courts and prisons.

    • Improving translation services in the court system.

    • Helping alleviate [linguistic] disadvantage produced by the legal process.

    • Providing forensic evidence that is based on professional academic knowledge of language and discourse.

    • Offering advice in legal drafting and interpreting, often with an emphasis on the use of 'plain language'.

    • Overall, the course promotes the use of forensic evidence that is based on the best expertise in the study of language and linguistics.

    • Overall, the course promotes the use of forensic evidence that is based on the best expertise in the study of language and linguistics.

    It is an avowed aim of the International Association of Forensic Linguists (IAFL) that forensic linguistics should seek to alleviate language-based inequality and disadvantage in the legal system, and this module embraces this aim.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to:
    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the scope and history of forensic linguistics.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to apply a range of models in language and discourse to forensic materials, whether those materials be spoken or written.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an ability to balance probabilities in linguistic evidence using quantitative data and with reference linguistic corpora.

    (LO4) Demonstrate an understanding of the constraints on language use and understanding in the legal process, with particular reference to social and cultural difference.

    (S1) Students will acquire skills in close linguistic analysis, of both spoken and written language, with particular skill in forensic document analysis.

    (S2) Students will be able to match different theoretical models with different kinds of forensic data.

    (S3) Students will be able to perform expert analysis and commentary on the language of legal documents, courts and prisons.

    (S4) Students will be trained to offer reasoned forensic-linguistic evidence that is gounded in academic knowledge of language and discourse.

  • Language and the Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (ENGL342)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop a critical understanding of the theories and concepts in Cognitive Linguistics and their application to neighbouring fields.

    To gain the ability to analyse language (sentence/text) with Cognitive Linguistics “tools” and methods.

    Learning Outcomes

     Demonstrate knowledge of the field of Cognitive Linguistics in its historical development.

     Demonstrate a critical understanding of the basic concepts of Cognitive Linguistics.

     Apply a range of Cognitive Linguistics models and methods to a variety of texts.

     Demonstrate the ability to produce informed and critical library research.

    ​Demonstrate fluency and rigour in oral presentations in the field of Cognitive Linguistics.

    ​Demonstrate academic writing skills.

  • Dissertation (semester Two) (ENGL379)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them. To build on students' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

    (LO2) Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

    (LO3) Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

    (LO4) Construct an original argument to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

    (LO5) Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

    (LO6) Work independently.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - Project management

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S9) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

  • Dissertation (over Both Semesters) (ENGL380)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them. To build on students' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

    (LO2) Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

    (LO3) Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

    (LO4) Construct an original argument to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

    (LO5) Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

    (LO6) Work independently.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – envisioning

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Time and project management - Project management

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S9) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

  • From Sign to Text: Exploring Multi-modal Communication (ENGL345)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To gain an understanding of the scope of Semiotics in its theoretical and applied strands.
    2. To develop a critical understanding theories and concepts in Semiotics and their application to neighbouring fields.
    3. To understand the role played by language among other communication systems.
    4. To be able to analyse linguistic and non-linguistic texts by applying key concepts, tools and methods in Semiotics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the scope and history of Semiotics.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the basic tenets and key concepts in Semiotics.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to apply a range of semiotic models and methods to the analysis of text/products/activities.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts within the field of Semiotics.

    (LO5) Students will use technical vocabulary accurately.

    (LO6) Students will demonstrate fluency and rigour in oral presentations in the field of Semiotics.

    (S1) Students will read closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will write clearly, accurately and effectively.

    (S3) Students will apply scholarly bibliographic skills appropriate to the subject.

    (S4) Students will present information within wider contexts.

    (S5) Students will plan, organise and report to deadline.

    (S6) Students will articulate their own and other people’s ideas concisely, accurately and persuasively both orally and in writing.

    (S7) Students will develop working relationships with others in teams, especially through constructive dialogue (for example, by listening, asking and responding to questions).

    (S8) Students will be sensitive to cultural contexts when working with others.

    (S9) Students will apply creativity and rigour to problem-solving, adapting to different demands and tasks.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

You will experience a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, with no modules being taught entirely through lectures. Alongside independent study and research, some modules require timetabled student group work. We provide an online programme of study skills to help with the necessary standards of referencing and presentation in written work. Tutorials allow for discussion of key readings, concepts and ideas, typically in groups of up to nine students.
Seminar groups are larger, but do not normally exceed 18; they usually last for between one and a half to two hours. Workshops are similar in size but have a more distinct practical element (eg in drama or language modules). In addition, in Years Two and Three, you will participate to a greater or lesser extent in a range of other formative activities: seminar presentations, creative writing and peer teaching.


Assessment

The main modes of assessment are through a combination of essay and examination, but depending on the modules taken you may encounter project work, presentations (individual or group), and portfolios of creative work or specific tests focused on editing, translation or etymological tasks.