English Language BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: Q310
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : AAB-ABB / IB : 35-33 including 6 in HL English with no score less than 4 / BTEC : Applications considered
english-3

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Describing English Language (ENGL101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims
  • ​Tofamiliarise students with the structural aspects of language

  • ​Toraise student awareness of the nature of specific structures (eg. words,sounds) and their contribution to the constitution of the English language. 

  • To enable students to analyse real language data drawingupon relevant theoretical concepts

  • Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate an understanding ofthe major concepts in language study

    Beable to discuss some of the main ways in which the academic study of languageis conducted ​

    Have a clear understanding of therelationship between the structural aspects of English

    Demonstratethe ability to apply relevant theoretical concepts to real language data ​

  • English Language: Variation and Context (ENGL110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims
  • To introduce students to language variation and the importance of context in shaping language.
  • To raise student awareness of the communicative purposes served through language use.

  • To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to ​analyse and interpret a wide range of language data.

  • Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a clear understanding of language variation and the importance of context in shaping language.

    ​Exhibit knowledge and understanding of the communicative functions of language.

    ​Appreciate the different ways of studying the English language.

    Analyse and interpret variation and context in naturally occurring data​.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Psycholinguistics (ENGL202)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The main aim of this module is to explore questions concerning the relationship of language to consciousness. This will entail addressing questions concerning the nature of language in its evolutionary, acquisitional, developmental and degenerative stages, and the nature of human language as compared to non-human communication systems, such as those used by computers, apes, and other animals.

    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate awareness of the main issues in the psychology of language, and in the philosophy of mind in relation to language.

    ​Demonstrate ability to give critical accounts of a range of human and non-human communication systems in their various stages of development.

    ​Demonstrate awareness of the practical and ethical considerations which arise from engaging with human language in its various stages of development, and with non-human communication.

    ​Be able to articulate 1-3 above in an appropriate academic style.

  • The History of English: Variation and Change (ENGL221)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims
    1. The main aims of the module are:

      to examine some of the most important developments in the history of English

    2. ​to introduce students to some modern theories of language change and how they apply to the history of English​
    3. to introduce students to some basic research tools for the study of the history of English​
    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate:

    a basic understanding of the main changes that the English language has undergone from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day

    ​an ability to critically evaluate modern published work on different aspects of the history of English​

    an ability to work with historical corpora​ and on-line resources on the history of English
  • Pragmatics (ENGL274)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
    1. The module aims to enable students to understand and apply a range of pragmatic theories.

    2. Specifically, it clarifies - as far as possible - the distinction between semantics and pragmatics in accounting for communicated meaning, and the range of ways in which pragmatic meaning has been explained. ​
    3. It encourages students to consider the relative merits of different pragmatics theories as analytical approaches to meaning in context.
    4. It introduces and discusses the implications of pragmatics for our understanding of the nature and use of language in a range of different ''real world'' situations.
    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module students will be able to

    1) analyse relevant linguistic data using a range of pragmatic frameworks.

    2) critically compare and evaluate different pragmatic theories in relation to this data. ​3) assess the insights that pragmatic theory can offer into a range of linguistic issues concerning the nature, acquisition and use of language. ​

  • Language in Society (ENGL276)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims
  • To make students aware of the interactive relationship between language and society.
  • ​To familiarise students with variation in the use of language.

  • ​To provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale sociolinguistic research.

  • Learning Outcomes

    ·   Demonstrate an understanding of the scope ofsociolinguistics in relation to other linguistic disciplines.


    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the social dimension of language and its implication for applied areas, including language education and policy​.

    Demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts within the field of sociolinguistics.​

    Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of sociolinguistic methodology that allows students to collect language data and to analyse this data from a sociolinguistic perspective.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Analysing Discourse (ENGL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to equip students with a knowledge of how discourse works at linguistic, metalinguistic, and paralinguistic levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of discourse types, and will learn methodologies (and their theoretical bases) available for analysing them, especially with a view to exposing meanings which would otherwise remain hidden.

    Learning Outcomes

    On completion of the module, students will be able to:

    Understand the theoretical principles behind discourse analysi





    Identify a broad range of discourse type

    ​​

    Collect discourse data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodology​​​​​

    Understand the implicit or concealed ideology that motivates discourse​
  • Varieties of Northern English (ENGL308)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. To familiarise students with the origins of Northern English and their role in the development of Modern Standard English
    2. To raise student critical awareness of language variation​
    3. To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to conduct their own case study and analyse original data​
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Demonstrate a critical understanding of varieties of Northern English and their role in the development of Modern Standard English

    Detect and identify the distinctive features of the varieties of Northern English​

    Construct a corpus of written representations of a Northern dialect and conduct a quantitative analysis of corpus data

    ​Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, geographical and social factors surrounding varieties of Northern English

  • Attitudes to English (ENGL361)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
    1. ​ ​To gain an understanding of (a) the most important ideological trends that have shaped social attitudes to language change in the history of English (1300-present) and (b) their consequences for the contemporary society (in realms such as the media or education)

          

    2. ​​To develop the students’ transferable skills by encouraging them to
      • examine historical and contemporary texts in an informed and critical manner
      • compile and analyse ''real'' linguistic data (corpus and questionnaire survey)
    Learning Outcomes

    An understanding of the different attitudes tolanguage change throughout the history of English

      ​​An understanding of the consequences that changing attitudes to the English language have in contemporary society

      An understanding of the ways in which ideology is manifested in historical texts from themedieval period to the present day

      The ability to analyse and comment critically language-related historical documents (1300-present)​

      The ability to collect data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodologies

    • Language and Literature (ENGL383)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts

    • ​To introduce you to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts

    • ​To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches

    • To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way​

    • Learning Outcomes

      Your analytical skills will be sharpened

      ​Your knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened

      ​You will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner

    • Language and Gender (ENGL400)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
      Aims
      1. To familiarise students with past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to language and gender.

      2. To develop students'' critical understanding of current theories of language and gender as well as their ability to apply these in real data and real-life situations.

      3. To enhance students'' awareness in the role of language in constructing gender.​

      4. To provide students with experience in conducting their own empirical study in an area of language and gender.

      Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main schools of thought within the field of language and gender and the methodologies used in this line of research.

      Demonstrate the ability to comment critically on the major studies within the field.​

      Demonstrate the ability to analyse data drawing upon the relevant theoretical concept and apply standards data analysis techniques and background concepts to new data.​

    The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


    Teaching and Learning

    You will experience a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, with no modules being taught entirely through lectures. Alongside independent study and research, some modules require timetabled student group work. We provide an online programme of study skills to help with the necessary standards of referencing and presentation in written work. All our Year One modules have tutorials to follow up on the lectures, so you have plenty of opportunities to contribute to discussion and to develop material presented in lectures. Seminar groups are larger, but do not normally exceed 18; they usually last for between one and a half to two hours; workshops are similar in size but have a more distinct practical element (eg in drama or language modules). In addition, in Years Two and Three, you will participate to a greater or lesser extent in a range of other formative activities: seminar presentations, creative writing and peer teaching.


    Assessment

    The main modes of assessment are through a combination of essay and examination, but depending on the modules taken you may encounter project work, presentations (individual or group), and portfolios of creative work or specific tests focused on editing, translation or etymological tasks.