English Language BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: Q310
  • Year of entry: 2019
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 including 6 in HL English with no score less than 4 / BTEC : Applications considered
english-3

Module details

Students must take modules amounting to 120 credits per year.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Describing English Language (ENGL101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims
  • ​Tofamiliarise students with the structural aspects of language

  • ​Toraise student awareness of the nature of specific structures (eg. words,sounds) and their contribution to the constitution of the English language. 

  • To enable students to analyse real language data drawingupon relevant theoretical concepts

  • Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate an understanding ofthe major concepts in language study

    Beable to discuss some of the main ways in which the academic study of languageis conducted ​

    Have a clear understanding of therelationship between the structural aspects of English

    Demonstratethe ability to apply relevant theoretical concepts to real language data ​

  • English Language: Variation and Context (ENGL110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims
  • To introduce students to language variation and the importance of context in shaping language.
  • To raise student awareness of the communicative purposes served through language use.

  • To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to ​analyse and interpret a wide range of language data.

  • Learning OutcomesDemonstrate a clear understanding of language variation and the importance of context in shaping language.

    ​Exhibit knowledge and understanding of the communicative functions of language.

    ​Appreciate the different ways of studying the English language.

    Analyse and interpret variation and context in naturally occurring data​.

  • Close Reading: (ENGL103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
  • To foster and enhance the skills of close reading by drawing attention to what is needed to read texts attentively and to acquire appropriate vocabulary and techniques for successful close reading. consider the implications of these categories for both writing and reading literary texts.

  • To enable students to criticise and write focused critical essays on the basis of their attentive reading,  discuss mattes such as form, structure, voice and genre with confidence and using appropriate vocabular; ​

  • To expand our understanding and appreciation of texts and to consider the implications of using categories such as genre, structure, voice and form when analysing and discussing text.​

  • Learning Outcomes

    The ability to demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles and aims of literary criticism, including offering intelligent and informed responses to a range of literary texts from a variety of periods.

    The ability to deploy an initial analytical and critical vocabulary for the discussion of English literature and to demonstrate the knowledge and skills of close reading in informed discussion, both orally and in the writing of coherent, lucid and informed critical essays. ​

    To develop the ability to listen attentively and garner relevant information, practice and knowledge from views presented by others.​

  • Shakespeare: Ways of Thinking (ENGL112)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims
    1. To examine closely a range of Shakespeare''s plays and the cultural and historical contexts in which they were originally produced, read, and performed.

    2. 2.​  To develop an understanding of the ways of thinking presented within Shakespeare''s plays, through language, poetry, rhetoric, drama, and the manipulation of sources and genres.
        3.  To introduce students to the diversity of current critical and theoretical perspectives and ways of thinking about the plays.
      Learning Outcomes

      Upon completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate:

      Knowledge of a substantial number of Shakespeare’s works, from various genres, and of their relations to each other.


      The ability to relate the plays to their literary, cultural, and historical contexts.

      An informed awareness of established critical traditions, and of the various ways in which one might make critical and theoretical approaches to Shakespearean drama, using appropriate critical methodologies, vocabulary, and secondary sources.

      The capacity to structure a coherent and critically informed analysis of selected texts and specific passages and scenes.​
    1. Literature in Time (ENGL111)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
      Aims
    2. To consider in detail, and from a range of critical and historicalperspectives, (a) how texts can be grouped in literary or cultural periods, (b)how texts respond to other texts over wide spans of time, and (c) how textsrespond to immediate public or historical events.

    3. ​To examine the relationship between writing and different kinds of context (historical, biographical, print).

    4. ​Tohighlight the importance of Blblical sources within the history of literature.

    5. Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate familiaritywith a range of literary genres and conventions from a variety of periods.

      ​Demonstrate the abilityto provide historically informed, contextualised readings of literary texts.

      ​Demonstrate familiarity with a range of critical approaches to the literary texts,authors and issues covered by the module.

      ​Demonstrate the abilityto participate in group discussion of this material, and write coherentlyconstructed and knowledgeable essays on the texts and issues studied.

    6. Ways of Reading (ENGL113)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims
      1. To allow you to consider the ways in which we read and write about literary texts in different contexts (political, historical, and aesthetic)
      2. To encourage you to consider how different methods of reading and interpretation might improve your understanding and analysis of literary texts
      3. To introduce you to critical issues related to shifts in the creation and reception of literary texts 
      Learning Outcomes​​​​​Interpret literary texts in relation to specific themes and issues

      Apply appropriate critical terminology and methodologies in the production of literary interpretations

       

      ​​Explain different ways in which literary texts can be interpreted in diverse contexts

    Year Two Compulsory Modules

    • The History of English: Variation and Change (ENGL221)
      Level2
      Credit level30
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims​The main aims of the module are:
      1. to examine some of the most important developments in the history of English;

      2. ​to introduce students to some modern theories of language change and how they apply to the history of English​;
      3. ​to introduce students to some basic research tools for the study of the history of English​

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate:

      A basic understanding of the main changes that the English language has undergone from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day.

      ​An ability to critically evaluate modern published work on different aspects of the history of English​.

      ​An ability to work with historical corpora​ and on-line resources on the history of English.

    • Language in Society (ENGL276)
      Level2
      Credit level30
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims
      1. To make students aware of the interactive relationship between language and society.
      2. To familiarise students with variation in the use of language.
      3. To provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale sociolinguistic research.
      Learning Outcomes

      Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the social dimension of language and its implication for applied areas, including language education and policy​.

      Students will demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts within the field of sociolinguistics.​

      Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of sociolinguistic methodology that allows students to collect language data and to analyse this data from a sociolinguistic perspective.

      ​Students will demonstrate an understanding of the scope of sociolinguistics in relation to other linguistic disciplines.

    Year Two Optional Modules

    • Pragmatics 2 (ENGL281)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      ​The module aims to enable students to understand and apply a range of pragmatic theories.

      Specifically, it clarifies - as far as possible - the distinction between semantics and pragmatics in accounting for communicated meaning, and the range of ways in which pragmatic meaning has been explained.


      It encourages students to consider the relative merits of different pragmatics theories as analytical approaches to meaning in context.
      It introduces and discusses the implications of pragmatics for our understanding of the nature and use of language in a range of different ''real world'' situations.
      Learning Outcomes

      ​By the end of the module students will be able to:

      1) Analyse relevant linguistic data using a rang of pragmatic frameworks.

      ​2) Critically compare and evaluate different pragmatic theories in relation to this data.

      ​3) ​Assess the insights that pragmatic theory can offer into a range of linguistic issues concerning the nature, acquisition and use of language.

    • Psycholinguistics 2 (ENGL283)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      ​The main aim of this module is to explore questions concerning the relationship of language to consciousness. This will entail addressing questions concerning the nature of language in its evolutionary, acquisitional, developmental and degenerative stages, and the nature of human language as compared to non-human communication systems, such as those used by computers, apes, and other animals.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Demonstrate awareness of some of the main issues in the psychology of language, and/or in the philosophy of mind in relation to language.

      ​Demonstrate ability to give critical accounts of some human and/or non-human communication systems in their various stages of development.

      ​​Demonstrate awareness of some of the practical and ethical considerations which arise from engaging with human language in its various stages of development, and/or with non-human communication.

      ​​Be able to articulate 1-3 above in an appropriate academic style.

    • Multilingualism in Society 2 (ENGL292)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      to introduce students to sociolinguistic and ethnographic approaches to the study of multilingualism;

      to cultivate an understanding of how multiple languages are managed in society;

      to develop critical understanding of the differentiated evaluatoin and use of multilingual varieties.​
      Learning Outcomes

      demonstrate some understanding of the major theoretical concepts in the study of multilingualism  

      be able to discuss some of the main ways multilingualism is studied​

      have a basic understanding of the management, evaluation, and use of multiple languages in society​

      be able to apply relevant theoretical concepts and research methods to the analysis of multilingualism as observed in everday life ​
    • First Language Acquisition (ENGL246)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      ​The aims of this module are: 

      •    To make students aware of the scope, history, and the main findings of the field. 

      •    To familiarise students with the most important theoretical and methodological issues in the area of child language acquisition. 

      •    To give students the opportunity to cirtically reflect upon the representation of child language research in popular media 


      Learning Outcomes

      ​•    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of both the scope of child language acquisition in relation to other linguistic disciplines and some of the major findings within the field

      ​•    Demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts and different methodological approaches within the field of CLA

      ​•    Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect upon the way in which CLA findings are made available to a lay audience via popular media

      ​•    Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of relevant methodology that is relevant for corpus-studies from a CLA perspective.

    • Human Voices (2) (COMM225)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims

      Aims:

      To introduce the basic study of phonology.

      To introduce skills of transcription of English phonology in a standard Southern/BBC accent.

      To introduce other aspects of vocal meaning and the ability to analyse these from the standpoint of the semiotics of sound (van Leeuwen 1999 - see Recommended Texts).

      Learning Outcomes

      Students will recognise and use symbols from the International Phonetic Alphabet which are commonly used to transcribe English speech in a Received Pronunciation accent, and they will thus demonstrate, specifically through the class test, that they understand how to make practical use of the IPA and have the skill to do so themselves in reference to spoken English.

      Students will be able to specify what vowel and consonant sounds mark the difference between RP and one or more other English accent such as General American or Cockney. Students will not all focus on the same accent(s), but will be given via VITAL, resources (recordings, access to relevant books, articles, web sites) to explore the particular accent(s) they are interested in. They will need to do this because a required component of the case study is a paragraph or two on their chosen speaker’s accent. The chosen speaker may be a performer who changes accent deliberately for communicative effect.​Students will be introduced to the work of Theo van Leeuwen on the social semiotics of sound, with particular reference to vocal sound and specifically the timing and melody of English speech and the voice qualities of speakers.Students will understand Erving Goffman''s dramaturgical model for the analysis of speech events in terms of production format and participation framework (aspects of footing). They will need to understand the model as a condition of using it for their own purposes: a required component of the case study is a paragraph or two on the footing arrangements of the performance they are analysing. For example, they may need to explain that not all of the people at the event are part of the audience for that performance, and use Goffman’s framework to indicate what other participant roles are available in that context.

      Students will understand that the speaking voice has meaningful qualities that go beyond the actual words used. They will focus specifically on meanings conveyed through timing of delivery, meanings conveyed through melody of delivery, meanings conveyed through voice qualities. This will require a social semiotic approach and the framework developed by Theo van Leeuwen will provide that approach. Students will need to understand this framework as a condition of using it for their own purposes: required components of the case study focus specifically on timing, melody and voice quality.

    Year Three Optional Modules

    • Analysing Discourse (ENGL307)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to equip students with a knowledge of how discourse works at linguistic, metalinguistic, and paralinguistic levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of discourse types, and will learn methodologies (and their theoretical bases) available for analysing them, especially with a view to exposing meanings which would otherwise remain hidden.

      Learning Outcomes​On completion of the module, students will be able to:

      Understand the theoretical principles behind discourse analysis.

      Identify a broad range of discourse types.

      ​Collect discourse data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodology​.

      ​​​​Understand the implicit or concealed ideology that motivates discourse​.
    • Dissertation (semester One) (ENGL311)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them.


    • ​To build on students'' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

    • Learning OutcomesIdentify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

      Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

      Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

      ​Construct an original argument, to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

      ​Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

      ​Work independently.

    • Language and the Law: A Course in Forensic Linguistics (ENGL312)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
      Aims

      Practical in orientation, this module develops a set of methods for examining the links between language and the law in all its forms. The activities listed below reflect a consensus across the published literature in the field and therefore reflect the main duties a forensic linguist can expect to perform. Such activities include:

      • Performing expert analysis and commentary on the language of legal documents, courts and prisons.
      • Improving translation services in the court system.
      • Helping alleviate [linguistic] disadvantage produced by the legal process.
      • Providing forensic evidence that is based on professional academic knowledge of language and discourse.
      • Offering advice in legal drafting and interpreting, often with an emphasis on the use of ''plain language''.

      Overall, the course promotes the use of forensic evidence that is based on the best expertise in the study of language and linguistics. It is an avowed aim of the International Association of Forensic Linguists (IAFL) that forensic linguistics should seek to alleviate language-based inequality and disadvantage in the legal system, and this module embraces this aim.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of this module, students will be able to:

      Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the scope and history of forensic linguistics.

      Demonstrate an ability to apply a range of models in language and discourse to forensic materials, whether those materials be spoken or written.

      Demonstrate an ability to balance probabilities in linguistic evidence using quantitative data and with reference linguistic corpora.

      Demonstrate an understanding of the constraints on language use and understanding in the legal process, with particular reference to social and cultural difference.

    • Varieties of Northern English (ENGL308)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
      1. To familiarise students with the origins of Northern English and their role in the development of Modern Standard English. 
      2. To raise student critical awareness of language variation​. 
      3. To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to conduct their own case study and analyse original data​.
      Learning Outcomes

      ​Demonstrate a critical understanding of varieties of Northern English and their role in the development of Modern Standard English.

      Detect and identify the distinctive features of the varieties of Northern English​.

      Construct a corpus of written representations of a Northern dialect and conduct a quantitative analysis of corpus data.

      ​Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, geographical and social factors surrounding varieties of Northern English.

    • Language and the Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (ENGL342)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To develop a critical understanding of the theories and concepts in Cognitive Linguistics and their application to neighbouring fields.

      To gain the ability to analyse language (sentence/text) with Cognitive Linguistics “tools” and methods.

      Learning Outcomes

       Demonstrate knowledge of the field of Cognitive Linguistics in its historical development.

       Demonstrate a critical understanding of the basic concepts of Cognitive Linguistics.

       Apply a range of Cognitive Linguistics models and methods to a variety of texts.

       Demonstrate the ability to produce informed and critical library research.

      ​Demonstrate fluency and rigour in oral presentations in the field of Cognitive Linguistics.

      ​Demonstrate academic writing skills.

    • Dissertation (semester Two) (ENGL379)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
      1. To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them.

      2. ​To build on students'' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

      Learning Outcomes

      Identify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

      ​Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

      ​Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

      ​Construct an original argument to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

      ​Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

      ​Work independently.

    • Attitudes to English (ENGL361)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
      1. ​ ​To gain an understanding of (a) the most important ideological trends that have shaped social attitudes to language change in the history of English (1300-present) and (b) their consequences for the contemporary society (in realms such as the media or education)

            

      2. ​​To develop the students’ transferable skills by encouraging them to
        • examine historical and contemporary texts in an informed and critical manner
        • compile and analyse ''real'' linguistic data (corpus and questionnaire survey)
      Learning Outcomes

      An understanding of the different attitudes tolanguage change throughout the history of English

        ​​An understanding of the consequences that changing attitudes to the English language have in contemporary society

        An understanding of the ways in which ideology is manifested in historical texts from themedieval period to the present day

        The ability to analyse and comment critically language-related historical documents (1300-present)​

        The ability to collect data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodologies

      • Language and Literature (ENGL383)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
      • To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts

      • ​To introduce you to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts

      • ​To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches

      • To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way​

      • Learning Outcomes

        Your analytical skills will be sharpened

        ​Your knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened

        ​You will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner

      • Language and Gender (ENGL400)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
        Aims
        1. To familiarise students with past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to language and gender.

        2. To develop students'' critical understanding of current theories of language and gender as well as their ability to apply these in real data and real-life situations.

        3. To enhance students'' awareness in the role of language in constructing gender.​

        4. To provide students with experience in conducting their own empirical study in an area of language and gender.

        Learning Outcomes

        Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main schools of thought within the field of language and gender and the methodologies used in this line of research.

        Demonstrate the ability to comment critically on the major studies within the field.​

        Demonstrate the ability to analyse data drawing upon the relevant theoretical concept and apply standards data analysis techniques and background concepts to new data.​

      • Language and Globalization (ENGL430)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
        Aims

        Students learn to appreciate the often unexpected and complex ways language and communication are involved in the globalization process;

        Students use sociolinguistic concepts in creative ways to achieve innovative understandings of varied social phenomena under globalization.​ 

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Students will develop a critical understanding of the impact of globalization on language and communication.

        ​Students will be able to disucuss insightfully some of the ways to examine language and globalization.

        ​Students will be able to examine and explain in innovative ways the use and functionality of language in gobal contexts.

        Students will critically reflect on new forms of power and social relations in globalization.

      • Dissertation (over Both Semesters) (ENGL380)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterWhole Session
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
        1. To give students the opportunity to carry out independent study at an advanced level, with appropriate support, into a topic of interest to them.

        2. ​To build on students'' existing research skills and their knowledge base from other modules.

        Learning OutcomesIdentify a viable topic for research within the formal parameters of the project and formulate a research question of appropriate scope.

        ​Identify and apply research methodology appropriate to the topic.

        ​Identify and survey the relevant scholarly field in relation to the topic, and apply as appropriate.

        ​Construct an original argument to arrive at explicitly justified interpretations and conclusions.

        ​Apply appropriate writing and presentation skills.

        ​Work independently.

      • School of the Arts Work Placements Module (SOTA300)
        Level3
        Credit level30
        SemesterWhole Session
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
      • To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context.

      • ​To apply within that practical or vocational context professional, pedagogical, theoretical and other knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of the placement materials and/or tasks.

      • ​To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context, and reflect and report on the relationship between the two.

      • ​To develop and identify a range of personal/ employability skills, and reflect and report on this development.

      • Learning Outcomes

        To demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

        ​To reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

        ​To identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

        ​To identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

      • Language and the Mind 2: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (ENGL344)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ​To develop a critical understanding of the theories and concepts in Cognitive Linguistics and their application to neighbouring fields.

        To gain the ability to analyse language (sentence/text) with Cognitive Linguistics “tools” and methods
        Learning OutcomesDemonstrate knowledge of the field of Cognitive Linguistics in its historical development. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the basic concepts of Cognitive Linguistics.

        ​Apply a range of models and methods to the analysis of language based on key notions related to cognition.

        ​Master the discourse (“jargon”) of Cognitive Linguistics.

      • Varieties of Northern English 2 (ENGL324)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims
        1. ​To familiarise students with the origins of Northern English and their role in the development of Modern Standard English.
        2. To raise student critical awareness of language variation​.
        3. To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to conduct their own case study and analyse original data​.
        Learning Outcomes

        ​​Demonstrate a critical understanding of varieties of Northern English and their role in the development of Modern Standard English.

        Detect and identify the distinctive features of the varieties of Northern English.Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, geographical and social factors surrounding varieties of Northern English.

        ​Manipulate and interpret both quantitative and qualitative language data surrounding varieties of Northern English.

      • Attitudes Towards English (ENGL378)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        To gain an understanding of 

        (a) some of the most important ideological trends that have shaped attitudes to either particular language varieties (e.g. dialects in the UK, English in the world, internet English) or the language of particular social groups in the history of English (1300-present);

        (b) the socio-historical consequences of language attitudes in areas such as the media, education, politics.

        (c) selected linguistic frameworks and methodologies (e.g. Appraisal Theory, corpus linguistics) that researchers typically use to explore attitudes in language.

          ​​
        To develop the students’ transferable skills by encouraging them to:

        • examine historical and contemporary texts in an informed and critical manner;
        • compile and analyse ''real'' linguistic data (corpus and questionnaire survey)
        • apply the socio-historical concepts and theories seen in class to real-life language examples.

         ​

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should have an understanding of the different attitudes to language change throughout the history of English.

        ​Students should have an understanding of theconsequences that changing attitudes to the English language have in contemporary society​.

        ​Students should have an understanding of the ways in which ideology is manifested in historical and present-day texts.

        Students should have the ability to collect data and analyse them according to appropriate methodologies.

      • Analysing Discourse 2 (ENGL370)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ​The aim of this module is to equip students with a knowledge of how discourse works at linguistic, metalinguistic, and paralinguistic levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of discourse types, and will learn methodologies (and their theoretical bases) available for analysing them, especially with a view to exposing meanings which would otherwise remain hidden.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Students will understand some of the theoretical principles behind discourse analysis.

        ​Students will be able to identify a range of discourse types.

        ​Students will collect discourse data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodology.

        ​Students will understand the implicit or concealed ideology that motivates discourse.

      • Language and Gender 2 (ENGL402)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        1. To familiarise students with past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to language and gender. 
        2. To develop students'' critical understanding of current theories of language and gender as well as their ability to apply these in real data and real-life situations.

        3. To enhance students'' awareness in the role of language in constructing gender. ​

        4. To provide students with experience in conducting their own empirical study in an area of language and gender.​

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of some of the main schools of thought in the field of langauge and gender, and the methodologies used in this line of research.

        ​Demonstrate the ability to comment on the major studies within the field.

        ​Demonstrate the ability to analyse data drawing upon some relevant theoretical concepts and apply standards data analysis techniques and background concepts to new data.

      • Language and Literature (ENGL385)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
        Aims

        ​To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts

        • ​To introduce students to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts.

        • To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches.

        • To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Students analytical skills will be sharpened.

        ​Students knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened.            

        ​Students will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner.

      • Language and Globalization 2 (ENGL410)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
        Aims

        ​Learn to appreciate the often unexpected and complex ways language and communication are involved in the globalization process;

        use sociolinguistic concepts in creative ways to achieve innovative understandings of varied social phenomena under globalization. ​  ​

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Students will develop a basic understanding of the impact of globalization on language and communication.

        ​Students will be able to disucuss some of the ways to examine language and globalization​.

        ​Students will be able to examine and explain the use and functionality of language in gobal contexts​.

        ​Students will reflect on new forms of power and social relations in globalization.

      The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


      Teaching and Learning

      You will experience a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, with no modules being taught entirely through lectures. Alongside independent study and research, some modules require timetabled student group work. We provide an online programme of study skills to help with the necessary standards of referencing and presentation in written work. All our Year One modules have tutorials to follow up on the lectures, so you have plenty of opportunities to contribute to discussion and to develop material presented in lectures. Seminar groups are larger, but do not normally exceed 18; they usually last for between one and a half to two hours; workshops are similar in size but have a more distinct practical element (eg in drama or language modules). In addition, in Years Two and Three, you will participate to a greater or lesser extent in a range of other formative activities: seminar presentations, creative writing and peer teaching.


      Assessment

      The main modes of assessment are through a combination of essay and examination, but depending on the modules taken you may encounter project work, presentations (individual or group), and portfolios of creative work or specific tests focused on editing, translation or etymological tasks.