English BA (Hons)

Key information


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English BA (Hons)

The BA English degree programme gives you the flexibility to combine the study of Literature and Language in a balance that suits you, and offers optional modules in Creative Writing in Years Two and Three.

Our Literature modules cover a wide range of texts, genres and themes from the early medieval period to the present day. Our Language modules aim to provide understanding of the historical, social and psychological factors that shape the English language used in everyday life.

You will have the freedom to plan the specific path that you follow through the programme. We constantly monitor the curriculum and the modules on offer to ensure that the programme reflects current developments in the subject, and
conforms to national requirements.

English and Business BA (Hons)

Within this programme, you will take half of your studies in the Department of English and the other half in the Management School. You will choose modules worth 30 credits from each department in each semester of study.

For the English half of the programme, you can choose from the same range of modules as other students in the Department of English, studying the BA English programme, as listed below on this page.

For the Business half of your programme, you will take a selection of modules offered by the Management School to students on the Business Management BA programme, as outlined below.

Year Two Business Core Modules

Business ethics (PHIL272)

Business in the global economy (MKIB225)

Financial management for business (ACFI205)

Principles of people management (ULMS207).

Year 3 Business Modules

Core Modules

Managing knowledge for innovation (ULMS352)

Strategic management and business policy (ULMS353)

Psychological approaches to decision-making (ULMS351).

Optional module

You will also take one of the following optional modules:

Events management (MKIB367)

Global strategic management (MKIB351)

International marketing (MKIB356)

Tourism (MKIB337).

English and Communication Studies BA (Hons) 

Within this programme, you will take half of your studies in the Department of Communication and Media and the other half in the Department of English.

You will choose modules worth 30 credits from each department in each semester of study. For the Communication Studies half of the programme, you can choose from the same range of modules as other students in the Department of Communication and Media. For the English half of your programme, you will choose from the same range of modules offered by the Department of English, as outlined below.

  • Change Programme Year Two title to English in Year Two
  • Change the Programme Year Three title to English in Year Three
  • Add the following paragraph to the Year 3 Intro, just before the module list:

Please note: In order to study any Language module in Year 3, you must take at least one Language module in Year 2. In order to study any Literature module in Year 3, you must take at least one Literature module in Year 2.

Interested in finding out more? Hongqi shares her experience on the course, below.

 
"After I came to Liverpool, I believe my English skill has been already improved into another high stage, not only for writing but also for listening and speaking."
 

Ge Hongqi, English and Communication, Y2.
 

As XJTLU students will join Year 2 at The University of Liverpool, this page provides relevant module information for the following programme(s):

Communication Studies and English 2+2 Cover

View the 2+2 Communication Studies and English brochure. 

Programme Year Two

Year Two focuses on the major periods of English Literature and core aspects of English Language study. Modules available examine the literatures of specific historical periods, eg the Renaissance, Victorian, or modernist, or areas of language study including child language acquisition or psycholinguistics.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Declaring Independence: American Literature to 1900 (ENGL201)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The aims of this module are: to trace the historical development of American literature through the American Renaissance to the end of the nineteenth century; to examine burgeoning movements such as American Gothic and Transcendentalism among other topics; to analyse how American writers engage with the subject of their nation, especially with the stated ideals of the new republic; and to explore the different formal means they employ to express American identities.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (LO7) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the evolution of American literature from the late eighteenth century up to c.1900.

    (LO8) Students will be able to demonstrate their own critical understanding of American literature of the period and its tradition of criticism.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

    (S7) Students will gain the ability to manage their time and projects through coursework and a timed exam paper.

  • Child Language Acquisition (ENGL256)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:
    To make students aware of the scope, history, and the main findings of the field; to familiarise students with the most important theoretical and methodological issues in the area of child language acquisition; to give students the opportunity to critically reflect upon the representation of child language research in popular media; and to provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale (corpus-based) research in the area of child language acquisition.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of both the scope of child language acquisition in relation to other linguistic disciplines and some of the major findings within the field

    (LO2) Demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts and different methodological approaches within the field of CLA

    (LO3) Demonstrate the ability to critically reflect upon the way in which CLA findings are made available to a lay audience via popular media

    (LO4) Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of relevant methodology that allows you to analyse corpus data from a CLA perspective

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions

    (S2) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S4) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S5) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S6) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

    (S7) Research management; developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, and applying ethics

    (S8) Self-management; readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, and readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Creativity: Socially-engaged Writing Practice (ENGL275)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. The aims of the module are: to give students an opportunity to think about how creative writing engages with a global society, social justice, political and environmental issues and human rights.

    2.  To introduce and develop an awareness of the creative writing process, across poetry, prose, literary essays, journalist writing, reviews and other forms of online and printed writing.

    3.  To develop writing skills in conjunction with an understanding of social activism.

    4.  To introduce and develop an awareness of the function and importance of the drafting process.

    5.  To foster independent reading of contemporary writing in a variety of genre and media.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (LO7) Students will have the ability to engage with a variety of technical and formal approaches to socially-engaged creative writing, and to constructively evaluate their own writing.

    (LO8) Students will be able to develop arguments that reflect social engagement through creative and critical writing.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

    (S7) Students will gain the ability to approach creative writing through a variety of socially-engaged perspectives.

    (S8) Students will grain the ability to write creatively with attention to form and technique.

  • Friars, Whores and Rovers: Drama 1580-1640 (ENGL213)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce you to the variety of interesting and important theatre in the period 1580-1640 and to encourage an intelligent analysis of drama as a genre, involving the ability to respond to the plays via a number of different approaches.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (LO7) Students will have knowledge of staging as a context for discussing Early Modern drama.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

    (S7) Students will gain the ability to relate page to stage in both spoken and written discussion.

  • Banned: Fiction, Sex and the Limits of Decency (ENGL298)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to censorship and the debates around its informal and formal use;

    To equip students to study the novel and its relationship with censorship;

    To help students to see the relationship between censorship and the cultural and historical contexts in which it arose.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the major debates around the censorship of literature.

    (LO2) An understanding of key issues in the secondary literature in this area;

    (LO3) The development of the reading and writing skills appropriate to criticism of the genres

    (LO4) An ability to develop their own opinions in positive engagement with the secondary literature.

    (S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

    (S2) Time and project management - personal organisation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking

  • Language in Society (ENGL276)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To make students aware of the interactive relationship between language and society. To familiarise students with variation in the use of language. To provide students with experience in conducting their own small scale sociolinguistic research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the social dimension of language and its implication for applied areas, including language education and policy.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to critically compare and evaluate relevant theoretical concepts within the field of sociolinguistics.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic principles of sociolinguistic methodology that allows students to collect language data and to analyse this data from a sociolinguistic perspective.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the scope of sociolinguistics in relation to other linguistic disciplines.

    (S1) Investigative skills: searching out and synthesising information stored on paper, electronically or visually; developing skills of independent investigation, interacting with colleagues

    (S2) Problem-solving skills: formulating problems (factual, empirical, theoretical) in precise terms, identifying key issues, developing the confidence to address challenging problems using a variety of different approaches

    (S3) Communication/ verbal skills: developing the ability to listen carefully, to present complex information in a clear, concise and sophisticated manner both in writing and by oral presentation, and to present a discussion based on information collected from various sources and coherently synthesised, using appropriate referencing conventions

    (S4) Thinking/ intellectual skills: developing the ability to interpret and present data, critically address complex ideas, construct logical arguments, and use technical language correctly

    (S5) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

    (S6) Self – development skills: developing the ability to work independently, to use their initiative, to organise their time properly and to interact constructively with others

    (S7) Information Technology: developing the ability to use their computing and IT skills to help find, store and interpret information, to produce electronic documents and to use appropriate software confidently

  • Modernist Literature (ENGL232)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To equip you with the sophisticated reading skills needed to interpret modernist texts.
    To examine previous critical responses to these texts and weigh arguments against each other.
    To compare techniques developed by writers with those developed by artists in other media.
    To develop a critical appreciation of experimental narrative techniques, their purposes, effects, and implications. 
    To develop and deploy the nuanced forms of expression which will enable you to articulate your responses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (LO7) Students will have developed the confidence to discuss work or artefacts in different media from the period.

    (LO8) Students will be able to discuss the implications of various narrative and poetic styles and techniques (eg. interior monologue, allusion, 'unreliable' narration, free indirect discourse, free verse, stream of consciousness).

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

  • Modernist Magazines: History, Fiction and the Literary Periodical (ENGL299)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To enable students to examine the major literary magazines of the long twentieth century from a diversity of contexts;

    To introduce students to the magazine culture and its contexts in historical change of the long twentieth century;

    To consider writers’ innovations via analysis of the work of their predecessors and contemporaries;

    To encourage students to engage in the detailed study of both primary and secondary texts;

    To encourage students to consider magazine material culture and the systems of its production.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To appreciate the breadth and diversity of literary magazines in the long twentieth century.

    (LO2) To help students will acquire reading and writing skills appropriate to the advanced study of literature.

    (LO3) To encourage students to present their own ideas, in positive engagement with both primary and secondary sources and to encourage that presentation in both oral and written form.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - creative thinking.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

  • Pragmatics (ENGL274)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module aims to enable students to understand and apply a range of pragmatic theories. Specifically, it clarifies, (as far as possible) the distinction between semantics and pragmatics in accounting for communicated meaning, and the range of ways in which pragmatic meaning has been explained. It encourages students to consider the relative merits of different pragmatics theories as analytical approaches to meaning in context. It introduces and discusses the implications of pragmatics for our understanding of the nature and use of language in a range of different 'real world' situations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will be able to analyse relevant linguistic data using a range of pragmatic frameworks.

    (LO2) Critically compare and evaluate different pragmatic theories in relation to this data.

    (LO3) Assess the insights that pragmatic theory can offer into a range of linguistic issues concerning the nature, acquisition and use of language.

    (S1) Knowledge and understanding of core theories of Pragmatics and how these relate to other areas of language study/work.

    (S2) Ability to critically evaluate core theories of Pragmatics.

    (S3) Ability to apply theories of Pragmatics to data.

    (S4) Effective academic writing and referencing.

    (S5) Effective, targeted linguistic research.

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Negotiation skills

  • Psycholinguistics (ENGL202)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to explore questions concerning the relationship of language to consciousness. This will entail addressing questions concerning the nature of language in its evolutionary, acquisitional, developmental and degenerative stages, and the nature of human language as compared to non-human communication systems, such as those used by computers, apes, and other animals.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate awareness of the main issues in the psychology of language, and in the philosophy of mind in relation to language.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to give critical accounts of a range of human and non-human communication systems in their various stages of development.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate an awareness of the practical and ethical considerations which arise from engaging with human language in its various stages of development, and with non-human communication.

    (LO4) Students will be able to articulate 1-3 above in an appropriate academic style.

    (S1) Adaptability

    (S2) Problem solving

    (S3) Organisation

    (S4) Communication

    (S5) Ethical awareness

  • Restoration and Eighteenth-century Literature: Poetry, Prose and Drama 1660-1789 (ENGL272)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The module will introduce students to the wide range of writing in the period 1660-1789, including the rise of the novel and developments within poetic and dramatic genres. The module will investigate the literature of the period in the context of developments in society, in enlightenment thought and in the modes of literary production and consumption.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (LO7) Students will have a good understanding of the literary forms, techniques and strategies particular to the period in question.

    (LO8) Students will be able to discuss and present argument about the literature of the Restoration and eighteenth century.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

    (S7) Students will gain the ability to understand the development and deployment of literary forms and strategies particular to the context of the Restoration and eighteenth century.

    (S8) Students will gain the ability to discuss and present argument about the literary forms particular to the Restoration and eighteenth-century period.

  • Romantic Literature (ENGL218)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    To introduce you to a wide range of texts from the Romantic and pre-Romantic period. To improve reading skills specific to those texts. To give you an informed sense of the wider cultural history of the time and the interconnections between different forms of writing in the period.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

  • The History of English: Variation and Change (ENGL221)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    The main aims of the module are: to examine some of the most important developments in the history of English; to introduce students to some modern theories of language change and how they apply to the history of English; to introduce students to some basic research tools for the study of the history of English.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate: A basic understanding of the main changes that the English language has undergone from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day.

    (LO2) An ability to critically evaluate modern published work on different aspects of the history of English.

    (LO3) An ability to work with historical corpora and on-line resources on the history of English.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

    (S2) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills.

    (S3) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.).

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning.

    (S7) Time and project management - Project management.

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

    (S9) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S10) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving.

  • Victorian Literature (ENGL243)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The main aims of the module are to provide intensive study of a wide range of writing between 1837 and 1901, including the development of the realist novel, the problematic status of poetry, the rise of women writers, the role of Empire and to provide a context for such study in the light of the social, political, religious changes of the period.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (LO7) Students will have the ability to discuss in an agile and knowledgeable way the relation of Victorian texts to contextual problems of belief, identity, and social order, as well as the personal, family, sexual and public relations which lie behind Victorian questioning.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

    (S7) Students will gain an ability to relate close-reading work in literary texts to broader cultural currents in the nineteenth century.

Programme Year Three

In Year Three the emphasis is on specialisation within different literary genres and on the social, legal and other contexts of English language. You will also develop skills of independent research – for instance, by choosing to write a dissertation on a topic of your own design – and you will also have the option to take a work placement module that will give you workplace experience with an organisation relevant to your degree.

As a 2+2 student, you are required to undertake an element of your own research in the final year of your programme to be eligible for the dual award. You can meet this criterion by registering for the Dissertation module (Semester One, Two or One and Two).

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Almost Shakespeare (ENGL359)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims:

    To introduce students to a range of ‘offshoot’ texts that rework Shakespeare's plays in a number of formats and genres (fiction, poetry, drama, graphic literature, and film) produced by writers from Britain, America, and elsewhere throughout the twentieth century;-

    To address how Shakespeare's works and the 'Shakespeare myth' are figured, received, and understood through twentieth-century literary reworkings; -

    To examine questions of influence, reception, and intertextuality in these 'offshoot' texts, which have a life and status different from straightforward 'adaptations', and to consider how these works are derivative yet 'original' and distinct as literary works; -

    To explore how these writings interpret the text that they either continue or re-play or 'answer', revising how we see the original text and at other times subverting and dismantling it in more radical ways;-

    To assess the social and political issues surrounding various writers' creative and imaginative engagements with Shakespeare in terms of (for example) gender, race, sexuality, nation, and ideas of culture.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire, develop, and demonstrate knowledge of the literary culture and history of the Shakespearean 'offshoot' (its writers, its forms, its issues) throughout the twentieth century and to the present.

    (LO2) Acquire, develop, and demonstrate a nuanced understanding of the relationship between Shakespeare's works and their twentieth-century 'offshoots' through recognition of the intertextual and interpretative dialogues going on between them.

    (LO3) Recognise this literature’s relationship to Shakespeare's life and works, and the broader social and political concerns surrounding creative and imaginative reworkings of them (e.g. in terms of gender, race, sexuality, nation, and questions of low or popular versus high culture).

    (LO4) Analyse and discuss a range of texts (fiction, drama, poetry) in terms of their literary style, significance, and contexts, putting into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.  

    (LO5) Research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a specialised level.   

    (LO6) Evaluate and communicate both your own and others’ ideas.

    (S1) Written communication skills (style & argument, presentation & referencing)

    (S2) Oral communication skills (speaking, listening, arguing, persuading)

    (S3) Critical thinking and analytical skills

    (S4) Project planning & development

    (S5) Time management, discipline, & organisation

    (S6) Team working & co-operating/communicating with others

    (S7) Research skills (including identification and use of Library resources, and accessing online databases/research tools)

    (S8) IT skills (including word processing and the use of online resources and electronic media)

  • American Poetic Writing Since 1930 (ENGL302)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore and explain the prominence of such poets as Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, Gwendolyn Brooks and Jorie Graham in American poetry from 1930 to the present.
    To familiarise students with the work of some of their representative inheritors and followers in the "Confessional", “Beat” and “New York” schools.
    To address the major concerns of the American tradition in the wake of Modernism: reactions to materialism, the role of Emersonian individualism, the use of idiomatic language, and the development of the poetic line.
    To analyse parallel and later developments, including some or all of the following: relations between the literary and the oral; the growth of jazz-inflected poetry and relations between poetry and song; the feminist poetics of Adrienne Rich; and the postmodern aesthetic of John Ashbery.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Improved reading skills applied to American poetry since 1930 and to poetry more generally.

    (LO2) An enhanced understanding of poetics.

    (LO3) An increased understanding of the literary, methodological, historical and cultural contexts of the poetic writing of the period.

    (LO4) An ability to question the presuppositions of these contexts in a critically informed manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

  • Analysing Discourse (ENGL307)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to equip students with a knowledge of how discourse works at linguistic, metalinguistic, and paralinguistic levels. Students will be exposed to a wide range of discourse types and will learn methodologies (and their theoretical bases) available for analysing them, especially with a view to exposing meanings which would otherwise remain hidden.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will have the ability to understand the theoretical principles behind discourse analysis.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to identify a broad range of discourse types.

    (LO3) Students will have the ability to collect discourse data and analyse them according to an appropriate methodology.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to understand the implicit or concealed ideology that motivates discourse.

    (S1) Discourse analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • British Poetic Writing Since 1930 (ENGL305)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To generate an informed study of British poetry from c.1930s – the present. To develop skills in close reading, buttressed by an increased understanding of the literary, theoretical, aesthetic and historical contexts for poetry writing. To pursue an enquiry informed by (and critical of) ideas of nation, theory and poetics into the developments of poetry in this period with a view to questions of race, class, language and gender.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will gain an enhanced understanding of poetics.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to write about poetry for a non-specialist reader.

  • British Writing Since 1945: Fiction and Drama (ENGL314)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aims of this module are broadly to introduce students to a range of post-war British writing, and to promote the study of literary expression in contemporary British literature in its political and social contexts. The module aims to consider the literature of this period in a broad cultural and political context, and ask how forms of modern and contemporary identity are represented and contested within the literature and culture of the period, as well as exploring the relations between literary genres, particularly fiction and drama.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to: demonstrate an informed appreciation of a broad range of post-war and recent British writing

    (LO2) Think fruitfully about different literary genres, their uses, interactions and transformations

    (LO3) Discuss texts in relation to their political, social, psychic and cultural contexts

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Children's Literature (ENGL373)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    To explore the critical study of children's literature in a literary academic context; to consider the variety of types of writing for children, the aims of children's literature, dominant motifs and the question of a tradition, concentrating on writing from the "golden age" of children's literature (late C19th); and to explore the relation of such material to adult literature and the popularity of writing for children among an adult audience.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of, and ability to discuss in an informed way, the breadth of Children's Literature and recurrent themes within it.

    (LO2) Awareness of the development of Children's Literature as a topic for academic literary study.

    (LO3) An informed appreciation of the literary value of the texts considered.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Creative Writing (poetry) (ENGL372)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To give students an opportunity to develop practical poetry writing skills in conjunction with the development of critical readings of poetry. To make students aware of the function and importance of the drafting process. To establish student awareness of the writing process. To foster independent reading of contemporary poetry. To understand the importance of literary models.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn compositional techniques and methods (including drafting and reflection skills) appropriate to the genre.

    (LO2) Students will use a range of literary techniques.

    (LO3) Students will constructively evaluate their own poetry and that of their peers in the context of contemporary writing.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

  • Creative Writing (prose) (ENGL377)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of the module are: To give students an opportunity to develop practical prose writing skills in conjunction with the development of critical and theoretical reading in relation to prose genres; To extend awareness of the function and importance of the drafting process in relation to prose; To foster independent reading of contemporary literature in prose; To refine student understanding of the importance of literary models in the development of their own writing practice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have learned compositional techniques and methods (including drafting and reflection skills) appropriate to the genre.

    (LO2) Students will be able to draw on a range of literary techniques, e.g. image, symbol, point of view.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of genre and an awareness of the range of options available to the short story writer.

    (LO4) Students will be able to constructively edit and evaluate their own prose and that of their peers.

    (LO5) Students will be able to reflect on various aspects of the creative process.

    (S1) Adaptability.

    (S2) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis.

    (S5) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice.

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills.

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience.

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking.

    (S9) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take risk.

    (S11) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S12) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative.

  • Gothic Fiction and Film (ENGL325)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To enable students to develop a broader understanding of the historical development of the Gothic genre and its relationships to other literary and cinematic genres. To facilitate research skills in relation both to primary material and key theoretical and critical debates. To broaden and deepen students' understanding of relationships between literature, film and other visual and technological media. To interrogate definitions of Gothic and to evaluate both the distinctive characteristics and conventions of the genre and the stability of boundaries between Gothic and other literary and cinematic genres.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Develop a historical perspective on the emergence and development of the Gothic genre from the 18th century to the present, identifying key literary and cinematic works and their relationship to other cultural and/or artistic movements.

    (LO2) Develop skills of critical analysis of both literary and cinematic works and of theoretical approaches to the text/film relationship.

    (LO3) Understand and evaluate key critical debates about and theoretical approaches (psychoanalysis, feminism, deconstruction, etc.) to Gothic fiction and film.

    (LO4) Relate generic tropes and conventions to wider cultural considerations (artistic, political, religious, technological, etc.) and vice versa.

    (LO5) Develop skills of critical writing, incorporating both conceptual argument and detailed close analysis of literary texts and films. Develop an appropriate technical and/or theoretical vocabulary for critical analysis of literature and film.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S7) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S8) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • Introduction to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages in A Global Context (ENGL303)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
    Aims

    The module aims:
    • to provide students with an introduction to the principles and practice of teaching English to speakers of other languages;
    • to help prepare students with little or no teaching experience to teach English to speakers of other languages in the private or voluntary sectors or while travelling abroad.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of how theoretical assumptions about language and language learning inform the current practice of TESOL.

    (LO2) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of the role of English language teaching in a global context, including the economic, cultural, and social implications of teaching English as a global language.

    (LO3) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of different career paths available in the field of TESOL.

    (LO4) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with practical techniques for teaching aspects of the English language system such as grammar and vocabulary.

    (LO5) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired familiarity with practical classroom techniques for teaching receptive and productive skills and practical details of lesson planning.

    (LO6) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to apply knowledge of theories of language and language learning to the investigation of classroom-related issues and problems.

    (LO7) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to apply digital technology to language learning issues through corpora and online resources.

    (LO8) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to construct a cogent written argument in the form of a written assignment, based upon a range of reference sources.

    (LO9) On successful completion of the course, students will have acquired the ability to conceive, plan and deliver a short lesson on one aspect of English language to learners.

    (S1) Identifying target language for a class: how instruction can influence acquisition.

    (S2) Lesson planning; scope and sequence of classroom activities in class.

    (S3) Classroom management: giving clear instructions and comprehension checking.

    (S4) Interpersonal communication: developing awareness of how teachers model the language, interact with their students, and give feedback.

    (S5) Confidence: taking charge of a learning situation, setting and achieving goals, and reflecting on performance.

  • James Joyce: A Writing Life (ENGL499)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To engage with the oeuvre of James Joyce at an advanced level, considering his stylistic progression from the early stories to the final complex workings of Finnegans Wake;

    To provide students with the necessary historical and sociological background to understand the environmental conditions that produces a writer of Joyce’s stature and motivations;

    To provide students with a thorough understanding of the biographical facts of Joyce’s life and the ways in which this biography feeds into his work; 

    To encourage students, through seminar presentations, thorough compulsory reading and, finally, through a lengthy end-of-semester essay to reflect on the extraordinary range of Joyce’s achievement both in an Irish and in a world context.

    Seminar presentations will stress the importance of constructing a valid and lucid literary-historical argument under pressures designed to mirror an academic conference.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire the knowledge, interpretive and analytical skills appropriate to the advanced study of literature;

    (LO2) Learn to present their own ideas and assessments by engaging with the main primary and secondary sources;

    (LO3) Develop their communicative and presentational skills in both oral and written form;

    (LO4) Develop an appreciation for the unique achievement of James Joyce.

    (S1) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - listening skills

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S7) Information skills - critical reading

    (S8) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information. Identifying and evaluating information sources

  • Language and Gender (ENGL400)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with past and current theoretical and methodological approaches to language and gender.
    2. To develop students' critical understanding of current theories of language and gender as well as their ability to apply these in real data and real-life situations.
    3. To enhance students' awareness in the role of language in constructing gender.
    4. To provide students with experience in conducting their own empirical study in an area of language and gender.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main schools of thought within the field of language and gender and the methodologies used in this line of research.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the ability to comment critically on the major studies within the field.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to analyse data drawing upon the relevant theoretical concept and apply standards data analysis techniques and background concepts to new data.

    (S1) Problem-solving skills: formulating problems (factual, empirical, theoretical) in precise terms, identifying key issues, developing the confidence to address challenging problems using a variety of different approaches

    (S2) Investigative skills: searching out and synthesising information stored on paper, electronically or visually; developing skills of independent investigation, interacting with colleagues

    (S3) Communication/ verbal: developing the ability to listen carefully, to present complex information in a clear, concise and sophisticated manner both in writing and by oral presentation, and to present a discussion based on information collected from various sources and coherently synthesised, using appropriate referencing conventions

    (S4) Thinking/ intellectual skills: developing the ability to interpret and present data, critically address complex ideas, construct logical arguments, and use technical language correctly

    (S5) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

    (S6) Self – development skills: developing the ability to work independently, to use their initiative, to organise their time properly and to interact constructively with others

    (S7) Information Technology: developing the ability to use their computing and IT skills to help find, store and interpret information, to produce electronic documents and to use appropriate software confidently

  • Language and Globalization (ENGL430)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    Students learn to appreciate the often unexpected and complex ways language and communication are involved in the globalization process. Sociolinguistic concepts are used in creative ways to achieve innovative understandings of varied social phenomena under globalization.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop a critical understanding of the impact of globalization on language and communication.

    (LO2) Students will be able to discuss insightfully some of the ways to examine language and globalization.

    (LO3) Students will be able to examine and explain in innovative ways the use and functionality of language in global contexts.

    (LO4) Students will critically reflect on new forms of power and social relations in globalization.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Teamwork.

    (S3) Communication skills.

    (S4) International awareness.

    (S5) Critical thinking.

  • Language and Literature (ENGL383)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To combine linguistic and literary approaches to the study of literary texts. To introduce you to linguistic methods for the analysis of literary texts. To contest the effectiveness of different analytical approaches. To combine theories and literary texts of your own choosing in an imaginative and original way.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Your analytical skills will be sharpened.

    (LO2) Your knowledge of literary-linguistic debate will be heightened.

    (LO3) You will be able to engage confidently in literary-linguistic debate in a creative, critical and well-informed manner.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Language and the Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics (ENGL342)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop a critical understanding of the theories and concepts in Cognitive Linguistics and their application to neighbouring fields.

    To gain the ability to analyse language (sentence/text) with Cognitive Linguistics “tools” and methods.

    Learning Outcomes

     Demonstrate knowledge of the field of Cognitive Linguistics in its historical development.

     Demonstrate a critical understanding of the basic concepts of Cognitive Linguistics.

     Apply a range of Cognitive Linguistics models and methods to a variety of texts.

     Demonstrate the ability to produce informed and critical library research.

    ​Demonstrate fluency and rigour in oral presentations in the field of Cognitive Linguistics.

    ​Demonstrate academic writing skills.

  • Literature, Science and Science Fiction (ENGL403)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to: Enhance students’ understanding of the relationship between literature (including SF) and science. Develop students’ critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in its scientific context, particularly in relation to questions of environment and ecology. Use literature to think about science in its social and political context across different historical periods and its relationship to issues such as climate change, extinction, technology, sustainability and genetic engineering.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of the module, students will have: the ability to demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of literary texts which engage with scientific ideas, practices and forms of writing, within their cultural context.

    (LO2) The ability to engage critically with scientific texts in relation to literary contexts and ways of reading.

    (LO3) The ability to demonstrate a critical understanding of debates concerning the relationship between literature and the sciences.

    (LO4) The ability to put into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.

    (LO5) The ability to research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a more specialised level.

    (LO6) The ability to evaluate and communicate effectively both their own and others’ ideas.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

  • Millennial Literature and Culture (ENGL301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of this module are as follows:

    - To enable students to engage with a cross-section of international literature (fiction and non-fiction) from 1990 to the present day and to understand the concept of "millennial culture" as scholarly discipline.

    - To allow students to become conversant with the major critical contexts of this era, to understand how these critical debates are conducted.

    - To provide students with the materials to perform a critique of literature of the 1990s and 21st century within a social and political context.

    - To attract students who are interested in approaching the study of contemporary literature as an inherently international practice.

    - To develop skills in the comparison of literary and critical/theoretical writing, and in the understanding of how to apply theoretical contexts to contemporary literary contexts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify the impact of critical and cultural arguments surrounding literature and criticism of the late 20th and early 21st century.

    (LO2) To recognise different modes of contemporary writing and identify the social, political and cultural context within which they were created.

    (LO3) To acquire and display a developed vocabulary of the critical terminology specific to the millennial era.

    (LO4) To articulate the cultural relationship between literary and theoretical texts related to millennial culture.

    (LO5) To recognise and respond to the discourse of millennial literature and culture as an inherently international undertaking.

    (S1) Organisational skills: Ability to understand and critique the terminology of millennial literature and culture.

    (S2) Communication skills: Ability to discuss the cultural discourse of the late 20th and early 21st century in designated teaching sessions.

    (S3) International awareness: An understanding of millennial literature and culture as an international engagement.

    (S4) Independent research and essay writing skills: Ability to research and develop ideas in the form of an assessed essay

    (S5) Assessment planning skills: Ability to create a piece of formative assessment and develop it, through feedback and academic support, into a summative piece of written coursework.

  • Noir: Literature, Film, Art (ENGL321)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of a range of cultural artefacts within Noir. An enhanced sense of the range of writing, film and art in the genre of Noir. To develop a sense of the relationships between literary and non-literary, particularly visual media. To develop an understanding of the political, intellectual and historical contexts of Noir.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An enhanced sense of the range of writing, film and art in the genre of Noir

    (LO2) An enhanced understanding of various literary, cinematic and artistic techniques

    (LO3) Enhanced reading skills in relation to literary and other cultural artefacts

    (LO4) An enhanced knowledge and understanding of the cultural and historical contexts in which Noir is situated

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S7) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • Postcolonial Literature and Theory (ENGL401)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Acquire, develop, and demonstrate knowledge of the historical impact of British colonisation and colonial discourse on the literary culture of a range of countries located in Africa, South Asia and the Anglophone Caribbean.   Understand the establishment and development of postcolonial studies as an academic discipline.  Analyse and discuss the different literary and linguistic strategies postcolonial writers deploy to address colonial history and the postcolonial condition.  Critique a range of influential theoretical texts and apply these texts to literary contexts. Develop advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire and develop knowledge of the impact of British colonial history in a range of countries and their postcolonial legacies

    (LO2) Students will critically analyse the different literary and linguistic strategies used by writers from a range of Anglophone ex-colonies

    (LO3) Students will read, judge and discuss a range of postcolonial theoretical and conceptual texts

    (LO4) Students will improve independent research and essay writing skills

    (LO5) Students will be aware of literary traditions and cultural discourses which produce postcolonial literature and theory.

    (S1) Knowledge and understanding of the unique literary and linguistic features of postcolonial literature and theory.

    (S2) Knowledge and application of precise theoretical terminology.

    (S3) Awareness of how postcolonial literature and theory are positioned within a global context

  • School of the Arts Work Placements Module (SOTA300)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context. To apply within that practical or vocational context professional, pedagogical, theoretical and other knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of the placement materials and/or tasks. To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context, and reflect and report on the relationship between the two. To develop and identify a range of personal/ employability skills, and reflect and report on this development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    (LO2) To reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) To identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) To identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

    (S1) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

  • Talking Pictures: Comics and Pictorial Narrative (ENGL362)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of a range of texts within the tradition of comics, pictorial narrative and graphic literature.

    To develop a sense of the possible relationships between visual and verbal exposition and narrative form.

    To develop an understanding of the cultural, intellectual and historical contexts of comics and graphic literature.

    To develop an understanding of the cultural, intellectual and historical contexts of comics and graphic literature.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An enhanced sense of the range of the expressive possibilities of grahpic literature.

    (LO2) An understanding of various literary and artistic techniques.

    (LO3) Enhanced reading skills in relation to verbal and visual modes of narrative, and the relationships between the two.     

    (LO4) An enhanced knowledge and understanding of the cultural and historical contexts in which graphic literature developed.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

    (S7) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • The Novel: 1740-1830 (ENGL386)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting67:33
    Aims

    The module will introduce students to a variety of forms of prose fiction in the period 1740-1830. The module will give students an understanding of how the novel developed in the century following the earliest British examples.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire analytical skills and vocabulary appropriate to university-level work and be able to use them appropriately in relation to a range of sources from different historical periods and social contexts.

    (LO2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in written or spoken forms suitable for academic work and be able to participate constructively in group discussions.

    (LO3) Students will gain awareness of cultural, theoretical and historical contexts of literature and language use.

    (LO4) Students will have the ability to write well-constructed prose, reflecting appropriate scholarly knowledge and independent response within a sustained argument.

    (LO5) Students will have knowledge of one or more specific literary historical periods and the language and genres associated with it/them.

    (LO6) Students will have the ability to demonstrate research and evaluative skills that support wider literary or linguistic analysis, criticism, and/or data collection.

    (S1) Students will gain the ability to analyse and interpret sophisticated texts closely and critically.

    (S2) Students will gain the ability to construct and support argument in both written and spoken forms.

    (S3) Students will gain the ability to write with appropriate subject knowledge, using appropriate approaches and terminology.

    (S4) Students will gain the ability to identify and assess relevant information and data, and argue independently in response.

    (S5) Students will gain the ability to critically evaluate research materials.

    (S6) Students will gain the ability to undertake independent research, and to develop a sense of research attitude.

  • Varieties of Northern English (ENGL308)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. To familiarise students with varieties of Northern English in relation to Modern Standard English and other non-standard varieties.
    2. To raise students' critical awareness of language variation.
    3. To equip students with the theoretical and technological tools that will enable them to conduct their own case study and present, analyse, and discuss original data they collect themselves.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a critical understanding of varieties of Northern English in relation to Standard English and other non-standard varieties of English.

    (LO2) Detect and identify the distinctive features of the varieties of Northern English

    (LO3) Construct a corpus of Northern dialect language data and conduct both quantitative and qualitative analyses of corpus data.

    (LO4) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical, geographical, social and theoretical factors surrounding varieties of Northern English.

    (LO5) Acquire and demonstrate skills using specialist software used in the field.

    (S1) Time and project management - Personal action planning

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • War Writing (ENGL488)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore how “wartime” and “peacetime” are imagined by 20th and 21st century writers;

    To read essays and novels in the context of theories of wartime, peacetime, and their interrelatedness;

    To explore how the boundaries between non-fiction and fictional writing are manipulated by writers’ responses to war;

    To develop an analytical vocabulary for discussing war writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To understand the main theories of war and war literature pertinent to this module’s study of 20th and 21st century war writing.

    (LO2) To understand the principles of contemporary genre theory as they apply to this module’s study of the non-fiction essay and the novel.

    (LO3) To communicate effectively in writing, with an appropriate grasp of the mechanics of written English and in accordance with the style guide for the course module.

    (LO4) To present an organised, supported thesis on a topic related to 20th and 21st century war writing to an audience of peers and assessor.

    (S1) Time management

    (S2) Research skills

    (S3) Presentation skills

    (S4) Reading comprehension

    (S5) Persuasive writing

  • Women Writers (ENGL347)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The main aims of this module are to explore the work of a variety of women writers across a range of genres, including poetry, prose (fiction and non-fiction) and autobiography (fictional and non-fictional). To read women's writing in the context of feminist critical theory and debate, but without insisting upon femininist interpretation or response as the only valid response to works by women.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completing this module students should have acquired an informed awareness of the richness and diversity of women's writing and its place in the traditions of literature in English.

    (LO2) By the end of this module students should be able to engage with some aspects of feminist theoretical debate and be able to discuss its relations to women's writing.

    (LO3) Over the course of the module students will have had the opportunity to develop a written style that suits their own particular outlook on and interests in women's writing and the opportunity it offers to create new modes of expression or argument.

    (LO4) By the end of the module students will have acquired experience in selecting and completing essays on topics of their own choice and gained an understanding of what makes a feasible and interesting subject for an essay of 3,000 words.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S6) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

  • Writing for Radio: Broadcasting in Twentieth-century Britain and Ireland (ENGL487)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to radio as a writer’s medium and to the history of that medium;

    To help students situate writing for radio in its historical, political and cultural contexts;

    To invite students to investigate what is stylistically specific about writing for radio;

    To encourage students to produce their own broadcast.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To develop students’ ability to analyse a wide range of texts, ranging across major genres.

    (LO2) To enhance students’ critical reading and writing skills.

    (LO3) To foster in students an interdisciplinary and creative approach to cultural studies.

    (LO4) To encourage students to avail of the range of scholarly work written in the discipline.

    (LO5) To prepare students for further study of literature, professional training and / or employment in broadcasting.

    (S1) Global citizenship – cultural awareness.

    (S2) Technical skills – using specialist broadcast media equipment.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) – presentation skills.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) – listening skills.

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) – academic writing (including referencing skills).

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving.

    (S7) Information skills – critical reading.

    (S8) Information skills – information accessing (locating relevant information; identifying and evaluating information sources).