Criminology with Social Policy BA (Hons)

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Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Sociological Theory (SOCI101)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To introduce key classic and contemporary sociological theories.

    - To give students an appreciation of the relevance of sociological theory in producing knowledge of the social world.

    - To support and guide engagement both with a series of canonical sociological texts and the critiques thereof (and with specific respect to their gendered and ethnocentric nature)

    - To describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within sociology and evaluate their application in differing contexts

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Familiarity with key sociological theories and their inter-relation

    (LO2) An ability to evaluate the respective contribution of specific sociological theories/theorists to the discipline

    (LO3) A capacity to identify and assess the relative merits of sociological theory for the analysis of the social

    (LO4) An appreciation of the complexity and diversity of social life

    (LO5) Competence in using major theoretical perspectives and concepts in sociology, and appreciation of their contribution to knowledge

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S5) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

  • Studying Society (SOCI106)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    -To introduce students to the field of social enquiry and its proper objects of study

    -To introduce students to the principles and process of social research

    -To introduce students to strategies for finding, accessing and evaluating sources of information

    -To introduce students to basic methods and techniques of data production and analysis

    -To introduce students to basic techniques for presenting and communicating information effectively

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the nature of social enquiry and its objects of attention

    (LO2) An understanding of key principles in social research

    (LO3) An understanding of the social research process

    (LO4) An ability to find and access existing sources of information

    (LO5) An ability to critically evaluate sources of information and knowledge claims

    (LO6) An ability to produce and analyse data effectively

    (LO7) An ability to present and communicate information and findings of research in an effective manner

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Information accessing - skills used in technology

    (S10) Critical analysis - Critical thinking and problem solving

  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 1 (SOCI102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - Encourages you to think about history in sociological terms, particularly about the ways in which an understanding of the past can help to illuminate the present.

    - Provides you with an appreciation of continuity and change in social life in Britain, with an emphasis, inter alia, on politics, social policy, the economy, family life, and social and cultural relations.

    - Provides you with an understanding of how different social scientists have studied, described and explained these processes of continuity and change in various areas of social life.

    - Provides you with a way of putting wider processes of continuity and change in social, cultural, political and historical context.

    - Provides you with a foundation of theories, concepts and knowledge for study at the second and third years.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Encourages you to describe processes of social continuity and change over time in various areas of social life from a sociological perspective.

    (LO2) Encourages you to think critically about what we gain by investigating the links between the present and the past.

    (LO3) Encourages you to apply and evaluate sociological theories and concepts in relation to various conceptual, methodological and empirical issues surrounding the question of history and the analysis of social change in various areas of social life.

    (LO4) Supports the transition to modules in the second year with knowledge and understanding of key events and debates  in social, political and economic life.

    (S1) The capacity to think sociologically about various aspects of British life in historical perspective.

    (S2) The capacity to draw on theories, concepts and evidence in support of arguments and analyses.

    (S3) The capacity to critically evaluate theories, concepts and evidence used in support of others' arguments and analyses.

    (S4) Study skills: including note-taking, presenting arguments and critical thinking.

  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 2: Changing Inequalities (SOCI103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To provide students with an appreciation of the main changes that have taken place in British society since 1945, with a particular emphasis on 'race' and ethnicity, gender and social class.  
    - To provide students with an understanding of how sociologists have studied, described and explained these changes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) to describe and explain some of the main social changes that have taken place in British society since 1945 by drawing upon sociological studies.

    (LO2) to discuss the inter-relationship between 'race', ethnicity, class and gender and understand the influence of these on society.

    (LO3) to evaluate different sociological concepts and theories and relate these to broader historical, social and political contexts.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Introduction to Crime and Society (SOCI107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to sociological criminology To introduce concepts and frameworks through which the nature, extent and ‘causes’ of crime have been conceptualised To consider how crime is constructed, perceived and responded to within society To explore the inter-relationships between crime, social problems and their context

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Explain how crime is constructed as a social problem.

    (LO2) Discuss some of the main ways in which sociologists and academic criminologists have sought to explain ‘crime’.

    (LO3) Distinguish the approaches taken by sociological criminologists and compare them to other approaches (such as common-sense).

    (LO4) Comment on the relationship between theories of crime and popular, media and/or policy-responses.

    (LO5) Situate discussions of crime and criminalisation within an understanding of social divisions in contemporary society.

    (S1) Identify, summarise and comment upon different ways of approaching subject matter in a criminological fashion.

    (S2) Outline key strengths and weaknesses of criminological concepts, theories and evidence.

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Controlling Crime - An Introduction (SOCI108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide an introduction to the main institutions of criminal justice To explore and reflect critically on key concepts and debates about criminal justice responses to crime and victimisation To raise awareness about how crime and victimisation are constructed in by agents and practices of crime control   An appreciation of the range of responses to crime and deviance and an ability to interpret the values and practices of the agencies which administer them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Familiarity with key institutions of the criminal justice system, their roles and context (historical/social).

    (LO2) An understanding of relevant criminal justice concepts, debates and approaches and be able to employ these to reflect critically on criminal justice institutions.

    (LO3) Discuss the social and historical origins and development of the main institutions of crime and justice alongside new and emergent forms of crime control including the police, courts, and policy measures.

    (LO4) Critically evaluate how contemporary and alternative criminological and sociological theories can explain distinct modes of enquiry such as offending, deviance, and victimisation and the ways in which these are socially constructed and contested terms.

    (S1) Identify, summarise and comment upon different ways of approaching criminal justice subject matter.

    (S2) Outline key strengths and weaknesses of criminal justice concepts, theories and evidence

    (S3) Organise and articulate ideas/arguments both in the assessed essay and in informed contributions to discussions about the criminal justice system.

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Understanding Crime, Justice and Punishment (SOCI244)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To critically explore the main sociological and criminological perspectives on crime, justice and punishment 
    - To investigate the historical emergence of theoretical thought in relation to crime and subsequent development within particular perspectives
    - To critically assess and the strengths and limitations of particular concepts associated with different theoretical perspectives
    - To explore how key theoretical concepts and ideas relate to criminal justice practice
    - To critically understand these perspectives as they relate to social divisions (class, ‘race’, gender, sexuality and age)

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate critical awareness of the historical and contemporary significance of criminological concepts deployed to explain crime, justice and punishment

    (LO2) Exhibit understanding of the ways in which crime, justice and punishment are contested within and outside of academic thinking

    (LO3) Distinguish between different conceptual frames of reference and compare and contrast their strengths and weaknesses

    (LO4) Situate theoretical thought within the world of policy and criminal justice practice

    (LO5) Demonstrate how criminal justice theory and practice intersect with social fractures, inequalities and social divisions

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • Quantitative Social Research Methods (SOCI247)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To introduce students to the usage of quantitative data and methods in explaining the social world
    - To encourage students to reflect on the issues raised in attempting to gain reliable knowledge regarding the social world
    - To give students practical experience of working with and appropriately analysing data relevant to their studies
    - To encourage reflection on the strengths and limitations of using quantitative data in the social sciences
    - To prepare students for independent research using a range of quantitative data

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Assess the strengths and limitations of 'real-world' usage of quantitative data

    (LO2) Assess claims made about the nature of the social world based on quantitative data and establish their quality

    (LO3) Produce independent analysis based on a range of quantitative data sources

    (LO4) Appropriately present quantitative data

    (LO5) Use specialist statistical analysis software

    (LO6) Appreciate the range of quantitative data available for social research

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S8) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S9) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S10) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S11) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S12) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S13) Numeracy/computational skills - Numerical methods

  • Qualitative Social Research Methods (SOCI248)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    -  Introduce students to a range of research methods used in sociological research.
    - To give stduents some practical experience of data collection, analysis and presentation.
    - To encourage students to think about the ethical, epistemological and practical considerations of designing a research study and conducting social research.
    - To reflect on the role of the researcher in collecting and generating data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Select a research method to inform a particular research area/ research questions.

    (LO2) Analyse and present primary qualitative data.

    (LO3) Consider the ethical implications of their research, and demonstrate a good understanding of situated field ethics.

    (LO4) Reflect critically on their role as a researcher and demonstrate and awareness of the socio-political context of research.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Research skills - Ethical awareness

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

  • Policing in A Divided Society (SOCI241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    • To introduce some key concepts, topics and debates in the sociology of policing and the police.
    • To examine critically the role and conduct of the police.
    • To discuss and debate the significance of key social divisions to understanding policing

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and explain different perspectives on the role of the police in society

    (LO2) Apply key concepts, ideas and evidence from the sociology of policing (e.g. discretion, ‘cop culture’) to analyse critically the role of the police

    (LO3) Critically discuss the relevance of key social divisions (including class, gender, sexuality, ‘race’/ethnicity and disability) for understanding the role of the police in society.

    (S1) Information skills – Critical reading

    (S2) Information skills – Information accessing

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving – Synthesis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem-solving – Critical analysis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) – Academic writing

  • Punishment, Penalty and Prisons: Critical Debates (SOCI254)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To provide a broad overview of the historical, theoretical and comparative foundations of punishment and imprisonment nationally and internationally.

    - To examine the experiences and outcomes of imprisonment for identifiable groups of prisoners including: children and young people; women; black and minoritised people; older people.

    - To introduce a range of key debates and controversies surrounding the questions of punishment, penality and prisons in ‘modern’ societies and to subject them to social scientific interrogation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the trajectory of state policy responses in respect of punishment, penality and prisons (particularly in the UK) from the early nineteenth century to the present.

    (LO2) An ability to critically analyse the competing theoretical rationales for the practices of modern punishment, penality and imprisonment including: constructions of moral responsibility; deterrence; retribution; rehabilitation; reform; deserts; proportionality; incapacitation.

    (LO3) A familiarity with the contemporary politics of imprisonment and comparative penal regimes.

    (LO4) A grasp of the impact of imprisonment on prisoners in general and specific groups of prisoners in particular.

    (LO5) A capacity to critically assess the legitimacy of prisons together with alternative, penal reductionist and abolitionist perspectives.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S5) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Social Exclusion (SOCI205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore and evaluate the theory and practice of social exclusion as it relates to class, 'race', disability, sexual orientation and gender T o consider the impact of social policy on exclusion and policy options/strategies for the future To evaluate the theory and practice of social action as a response to social exclusion To explore the intersectionality of different groups' experiences

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Distinguish and apply different theoretical approaches to social exclusion

    (LO2) Evaluate policy responses and social action to counter social exclusion

    (LO3) Situate the relationship between exclusion and other forms of social stratification

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Comparing Welfare States (SOCI207)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    A1) Provide an understanding of Esping-Andersen’s typology of welfare regimes, ‘the three worlds of welfare capitalism’.
    (A2) Introduce the concepts of ‘decommodification’, ‘destratification’ and ‘systems of exchange’ and explain their significance in understanding ‘the mixed economy of welfare’ in different countries.
    (A3) Set out a systematic approach for critically assessing claims about the similarities and differences between welfare ‘regimes’.
    (A4) Compare and contrast welfare settlements in liberal, conservative and social democratic regimes with reference to the examples of the USA, Germany and Sweden.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge of Esping-Andersen’s typology of welfare regimes.

    (LO2) Link Esping-Andersen’s typology to the concepts of '(de)commodification' and '(de)stratification'.

    (LO3) Use that typology as a basis for comparing and contrasting welfare settlements in different countries.

    (LO4) Draw on evidence to critically assess claims about the similarities and differences between welfare regimes, including Esping-Andersen’s own claims.

    (LO5) Connect the development of welfare to the ‘political economy’ of capitalist societies.

    (LO6) Outline how ‘the mixed economy of welfare’ in different countries changes over time in response to wider social, political and economic challenges and crises.

    (S1) Comparative analysis

    (S2) Using conceptual frameworks to approach claims about the similarities and differences between the political economy of welfare states systematically

    (S3) Locating, analysing and critically assessing the relative strengths and weakenesses of different forms of evidence and the claims made on the basis of that evidence.

    (S4) Communication: presenting the results of analysis in a structured, clear and considered manner.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Short Interchange Project (SOCI311)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To facilitate you working in partnership with a VCO and engaging in self-directed learning in order to complete the agreed investigation.
    To support you to acquire research skills through independent research and project managment;
    To support you in applying your knowledge to a topic pertinent to a local VCO;
    To assist you to develop understanding of the workplace and bridge the gap between your academic studies and future employment;
    To enable you to exercise the inter-personal and time management skills required for indpependent research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Enables you to expore a topic in-depth

    (LO2) Offer an opportunity to apply your growing critical judegment and powers of anlysis to the area of inquiry

    (LO3) Leads to the production of a project report for the host VCO

    (LO4) Develops your grasp of the policy context and relevant literature or data sets related to your area of investigation

    (LO5) Enables understanding of methodology by demonstrating awareness of current debates in sociological methodology and where approriate being able to apply these to the project

    (S1) Communication and collaboration online participating in digital networks for learning and research

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

  • Health, Lifecourse & Society (SOCI307)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To demonstrate the relevance of sociological approaches to understanding health, illness and the lifecourse by considering a range of substantive issues and the contribution made by different theoretical perspectives to illuminating them.   To examine critically new developments in theoretical and methodological approaches to the social and cultural study of health and the lifecourse To review a variety of empirical studies on the social and cultural aspects of health, illness and the lifecourse

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of ways in which sociological approaches can assist in explaining experiences of health, illness and the lifecourse.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an understanding of key theoretical approaches to the health, illness and the lifecourse.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an ability to evaluate sources of data, including official statistics and examples of empirical research, in terms of the contribution they make to understanding health, illness and the lifecourse in its social context.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • Gender and Crime (SOCI308)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To raise key issues concerning the gendered nature of work on deviance
    - Exploring feminism's contribution to criminology
    - Exploring the link between masculinities and crime
    - Studying the experiences of female offenders
    - Exploring the experiences of women as victims

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the gendered nature of work on deviance

    (LO2) An understanding of feminist contributions to the study of criminology

    (LO3) Knowledge of key debates within criminology concerning the nature of offending by men and women, the treatment of women in the criminal justice system and women's victimisation and fear of crime

    (S1) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

  • Social Control and the City (SOCI310)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    - To understand the main theoretical arguments and debates around social control and surveillance practices.
    - To examine the relationship between the urban state power and the development of surveillance practices and social control
    - To critically assess the relationship between the prevention of crime, social control and how these impact upon populations defined by class, gender, 'race' and age
    - To explore social control practices as they impact on uses of space and coneptions of 'place'

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Grasp the main theoretical debates around social control in the urban context

    (LO2) Understand the relationship between city development and the problem of social order

    (LO3) Appreciate the contested nature of both urban social order and the meaning of 'public space'

    (LO4) Critically assess the relationship between crime prevention practices, social control and the constitution of social order in the city

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

  • Gender, the Body and Identity (SOCI315)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To introduce and review developments in social, cultural and philosophical theories of gender.
    - To develop conceptual tools to understand and engage with feminist debates on gender, the body and identity.
    - To examine a number of different and contrasting theoretical approaches which place gender, the body and identity at the centre of analysis: including feminist sociology, radical feminism, corporeal feminism, post-structural feminism, black feminism, queer theory and material feminism
    - To evaluate the form and structure of feminist arguments on the meaning and experience of gender for understandings of the body and power.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have knowledge of recent developments in social, philosophical and cultural theories of gender.

    (LO2) Have an in depth understanding of the conceptual tools which surround theories of gender, the body and identity.

    (LO3) Understand the key points of overlap and critical tensions between and within structuralist, constructivist, post-structuralist and materialist feminist theoretical frameworks.

    (LO4) Demonstrate the relationship between theory, analysis and interpretation and the skills associated with evaluation and presentation.

    (S1) Competence in using feminist theory and the concepts relating to gender in order to understand the relationship between the body and identity

    (S2) Appreciate the complexity and diversity of the ways in which gender is theorised, practiced and dealt with in society.

    (S3) The ability to identify the most important conceptual arguments in a text and to discuss, address and develop theoretical accounts in group discussions.

    (S4) Written skills, including the clear presentation of academic debates, and the student’s own arguments supported with evidence.

    (S5) Critical thinking skills, including the ability to be evaluative with academic material relating to gender and draw appropriate conclusions.

  • Victimology: Theory and Method (SOCI319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To map and outline the main theoretical pillars of victimology, and its contemporary developments
    - To inform the study of victimology in relation to interdisciplinary literatures and perspectives, particularly those pertaining to sociology and criminology
    - To explore the uses of textual and visual data for the purposes of studying and researching notions of the ‘victim’, victimisation, and victimhood
    - To critically appreciate the contribution and uses of (auto)biographical and narrative data to further victimological study and research

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To develop a critical appreciation of the sub-discipline of victimology, its strengths, weaknesses and contemporary developments.

    (LO2) To have a sound, critical knowledge of the nature and extent of various forms of victimisation.

    (LO3) To critically evaluate concepts of the ‘victim’, victimisation and victimhood in relation to relevant theory, policy and methods.

    (LO4) An ability to appreciate alternative sources of data as a basis for understanding the lived experience of victimisation, harm and survival.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

  • The Risk Society: Crime, Security and Public Policy (SOCI320)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To investigate the impacts of risk in contemporary society
    - To evaluate risk management strategies in the areas of crime, security and welfare
    - To scrutinise the efficacy of social policies designed to reduce risk
    - To explore conceptual and theoretical approaches to risk within the social sciences

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluating the impacts of crime, welfare and security risks on lived experience in the contemporary UK

    (LO2) Identifying and understanding the social and cultural processes which shape the construction of security risks.

    (LO3) Comprehending the relationship between the distribution of health risks and traditional forms of social stratification.

    (LO4) Comparing theories of risk with ethnographic research into the effects of risk on everyday experience.

    (LO5) Understanding policy approaches towards crime and security risks in terms of institutional regulation, legislation and management.

    (LO6) Articulating the links between identity, individualization and reflexivity in contemporary western cultures.

    (S1) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S2) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

  • Corporate Crime, Law and Power (SOCI321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To identify the main literature and sources relevant to corporate crime

    To identify key historical and contemporary debates in corporate crime research

    To explore a range of theoretical explanations for the social production of corporate crime

    To develop an understanding of the social representation of corporate crime

    To analyse the problems associated with, and prospects for controlling, corporate crime

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to identify key sources of data about corporate crime, drawn from a range of disciplines and be able to use these materials for research purposes.

    (LO2) An understanding of the problems of definition, recognition and measurement of corporate crime and how those might be overcome

    (LO3) An understanding of the complex relationships between the law, corporations and power in both historical and contemporary contexts

    (LO4) An understanding of the role of both national and transnational forms of regulation and law enforcement in the production and control of corporate crimes

    (LO5) An ability to analyse corporate crime through the lense of a range of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

  • Youth Crime, Youth Justice and Social Control (SOCI323)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To provide a critical overview of the historical development of state policy responses to youth crime (particularly within England and Wales) and to explore criminological and sociological conceptualisations of ‘youth’, ‘crime’, ‘criminalisation’ and ‘justice’.
    - To analyse the competing priorities and underpinning discourses that inform youth justice policy formation.
    - To explore the application of youth justice policy through the interventions of state agencies, and to consider the principal consequences of such interventions for ‘young offenders’, the management of youth crime and the regulation and governance of young people

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the trajectory of state policy responses to children and young people in conflict with the law from the early nineteenth century to the present and a familiarity with key debates within youth criminology and the sociology of youth justice.

    (LO2) An awareness of key criminological and sociological debates and an ability to critically analyse the competing priorities, tensions and paradoxes intrinsic to ‘welfare’, ‘justice’ and ‘retributive’/‘punitive’ approaches to the delivery of youth justice.  

    (LO3) A critical grasp of the politics of youth crime, youth justice and social control.

    (LO4) An appreciation of the temporal and spatial dimensions of youth justice and the significance of comparative transnational analyses.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S5) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

  • Politics, Society and the State: Classic and Contemporary Ethnographies (SOCI325)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    (A1) Provide an overview of ethnographic reserach traditions within the social and political sciences through an exploration of classic and contemporary studiesand their contributions to understanding of politics, society, government and state.

    (A2) Offer an introduction to conducting ethnographic studies and analysing teh results through lectures, seminars and first-hand experience of doing observational research.

    (A3) Show that sustained, in-depth observation, and the 'thick description' it generates, can be used to establish new ways of thinking about many of the central topics of sociology, social policy, anthropology, political science and beyond: including the state, government, democracy, justice, power, culture, organisation, order, rationality, accountability and risk - as well as their dark 'others': injustice, violence, disorganization, disorder, disaster, irrationality, corruption, venality and greed.

    (A4) Demonstrate that, as students of social and political life, we have as much to learnfrom studies of, for example, African or Native American/First Nation societies of the past as from studies of globalised capitalist societies today.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate knowledge of the kinds of ethnographic traditions that can be found in social and political studies of government and the 'relationships of rule' in sociology, social policy, anthropology, political science and beyond.

    (LO2) Conduct a small-scale observational study of politics-in-action and report back on it.

    (LO3) Work observational data up under different theoretical, methodological and analytical frames.

    (LO4) Outline the contributions of ethnographic research to understandings of politics, society and the emergence of new forms of governmental activity.

    (S1) Conducting observational research.

    (S2) Writing up observational data.

    (S3) Analysing observational data and reflecting on its value.

    (S4) Comparing and contrasting different analytical approaches to observational data.

    (S5) Understanding and communicating to others through written accounts of observational research.

  • Culture, Economy and Cities (SOCI327)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - Introduce key theories and concepts regarding the interaction between cultural and economic forces within the city
    - Explain the current position of culture within political, economic and urban spheres by tracing their shifting historical inter-relation
    - Reveal the links between urban, economic and cultural development

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the changing relationship between economic organisation and cultural activity

    (LO2) Engage with, and critique, key theories regarding the role of culture in contemporary cities

    (LO3) Critically assess a range of theoretical accounts of the cultural economy

    (LO4) Gain an awareness of changes in cultural policy up to the present day, and appreciate the socioeconomic backdrop to these policies

    (LO5) Understand the fundamentally social nature of cultural production and consumption

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S6) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S7) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S8) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding

  • The Panopticon and the People: Digital Approaches to the History of Crime and Punishment (SOCI328)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    • To introduce students to social studies of crime, offending, and punishment from the eighteenth to the present.
    • Encourage students to use and problematise a range of online research tools that facilitate the use of historical data to interrogate criminological theories.
    • Introduce students to a range of quantitative and qualitative methodological techniques that underpin such studies including record linkage, prosopography, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, and digital mapping (ArcGIS).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to problematise narratives of crime and criminal justice, and view offending and punishment as products of particular social, cultural, economic and political contexts

    (LO2) Be able to critically use historical evidence to answer contemporary criminological ‘What Works?’ questions and engage with criminological theory

    (LO3) Employ and interrogate online criminal history datasets, and critically consider their advantages and limitations

    (LO4) Practice a range of quantitative and qualitative digital methodologies and visualisation techniques including corpus linguistics, mapping, and record linkage.

    (LO5) Analyse and present research for online (blog) and offline platforms (essay)

    (LO6) Reflect on the ethical implications of researching and presenting historical material

    (S1) Practical online research skills and evaluation of online data

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving (critical analysis)

    (S3) Communication (written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Understand and problematise narratives of crime and criminal justice, and view offending and punishment as products of particular social, cultural, economic and political contexts

    (S5) Practice a range of digital methodologies and techniques

    (S6) Organise and articulate ideas/arguments both in the blog, essay, and in informed contributions to discussions about the criminal justice system in the past and present

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving (creative thinking)

    (S8) Identify, summarise and comment upon different ways of approaching histories of crime, punishment, and criminal justice

  • Critical Perspectives in Desistance From Crime (SOCI331)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ·          To introduce key concepts, topics and debates in the study of desistance from crime ·          To provide an overview and critical analysis of empirical and theoretical approaches used to explain desistance from crime over the life course including in terms of gender. ·          To examine critically the impact of desistance theory and research on policy and practice around resettlement and punishment ·          To discuss and debate the impact that new developments in the field can have on developing desistance promoting practice and reducing reoffending

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Explain and critically evaluate key theories, debates and research around desistance from crime

    (LO2) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of UK policy and practice in relation to resettlement and re-entry and the link to desistance theory

    (LO3) Identify and critically evaluate the role of punishment and prisons in the desistance process

    (LO4) Be able to recognise and explain the different approaches and issues in relation to desistance for women

    (LO5) Demonstrate a critical awareness of arguments around emerging and contemporary desistance theory, research, policy and practice

    (S1) Information skills – Critical reading

    (S2) Information skills – Information accessing

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving – Synthesis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem-solving – Critical analysis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) – Academic writing

    (S6) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

  • Gender and the Welfare State (SOCI332)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    On completion of this module, students should:  Have gained an understanding of  contemporary theories of the welfare state;  Develop knowledge of contemporary political economy debates and research on the gendered nature of the welfare state;  Develop an ability for critical analysis of key areas of research on the welfare state;  Develop an ability to evaluate empirical research and evidence of gender inequalities within contemporary welfare states.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of contemporary theories of thewelfare state;

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to critically engage with contemporary political economy debtates and research on the gendered nature of the welfare state

    (LO3) Demonstrate critical and comparative analysis of key areasof research on the welfare state

    (LO4) Demonstrate an ability to evaluate empirical research and evidence of gender inequalities within contemporary welfare states.

    (S1) Communication Skills

    (S2) Organisational Skills

  • Madness, Disability & Society (SOCI333)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of this course are to enable students to: ·          Understand and be able to apply socialperspectives on madness and disability to historical contexts and contemporaryissues ·          Conceptualise madness and disability as socialidentities with the attendant rights and claims to social justice ·          Understand the ways in which madness anddisability intersect with other social identities and wider power structures ·          Be able to critically evaluate and reconfigurecontemporary social policy and practice in accordance with social, rights-basedperspectives on madness and disability ·          Understand the current debates, tensions anddirections within mad and disability studies ·          Reflect on their own (prior) positions andunderstandings in relation madness and disability

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Articulate the social (rather than bio-medical)constitution of madness and disability

    (LO2) Evaluate issues of power and inequality emerging from thestructures of madness and disability

    (LO3) Demonstrate awareness of the ways in which madness and disabilityintersect with other social identities in historical and contemporary contexts

    (LO4) Apply a rights-based, social justice approach to addressingissues which emerge from the experiences of madness and disability in theory,policy and practice

    (LO5) Engage with current tensions and debates within mad and disabledperspectives

    (LO6) Demonstrate criticalself-awareness and reflexivity

    (S1) Critical analysis of policy and practice

    (S2) Critical self awareness

    (S3) Creative problem-solving/application

    (S4) Applying a social, rights-based model to a variety of contexts

  • Class and Everyday Life (SOCI335)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    On completion of this module, students should: G ain an understanding of classic and contemporary theories of class; Develop knowledge of contemporary sociological debates and research on class inequalities; Develop an ability for critical analysis of key areas of research and everyday life; Develop an ability to evaluate empirical research and evidence of class within everyday social life.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of theories of class analysis from Marxist, and Weberian traditions and contemporary Bourdieusian perspectives;

    (LO2) Demonstrate detailed knowledge of contemporary sociological scholarship on how class is changing, disappearing or being reproduced within societies

    (LO3) Be able to offer a critical reflection of key areas of research and social life from a class based perspective

    (LO4) Be able to grasp the complexity of class intersections with various social issues and processes in everyday life

    (LO5) Be able to deploy and critique empirical research and evidence of inequalities related to class

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Communication skills

  • Exploring Wicked Issues in Society (SOCI343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module seeks to enable students with a deeper critical understanding of intractable societal issues and to appraise how successive social policies have been developed to try to alleviate them. Through these understandings, and by giving students the opportunity to explore these students will develop their own knowledge and skills to research how particular issues are identified and problematised at particular times in particular societies, and an insight into how policies are interpreted and translated into practice.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To account for how 'wicked issues' are conceptualised and contested in the academic literature

    (LO2) To describe and critically evaluate the policy 'landscape' in the UK and beyond

    (LO3) To assemble and critically evaluate often conflicting sources of information about particular issues, including policy and grey literature

    (LO4) To appraise to how people working in social policy approach 'wicked issues' and the challenges they faced

    (S1) Presentation skills

    (S2) Policy analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving

    (S4) Working in groups and teams

    (S5) Creative thinking and reflective practice

    (S6) Formulating questions and engaging with debates

  • 'race', Community and Identity (SOCI346)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To explore the impact of colonialism on patterns of migration to Britain in the post war period and the creation of greater ethnic diversity.  
    - To examine the changing nature of racism as an ideology by exploring and contextualising scientific and institutional forms of racisms and 'newer' manifestations through Islamophobia. 
    - To examine the conflictual relationship between the state and minority ethnic communities through an examination of specific case studies
    - To unpack constructions of ethnic and national identity in the context of post-colonial Britain

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To critically distingusih and evaluate different academic and political perspectives.

    (LO2) Display an awareness of continuity and historical change in relation to 'race' and British society

    (LO3) To have some understanding of the relationship between broader socio-economic and political context and the issues of 'race' and identify

    (LO4) Recognise the way Britain's former imperial position has impacted upon recent pluralities of identity and multicultural development

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Documentary Photography As Social Research (SOCI348)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

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    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and explain major theories surrounding the photograph and the act of photography

    (LO2) Recognise major documentary photographers and visual sociologists and their influence on social research

    (LO3) Describe and identify potential ethical issues with photography as a part of social research

    (LO4) Synthesise sociological / criminological theories and photographic practice into a visually-focussed project

    (LO5) Apply basic photographic techniques in the development of a portfolio

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S5) Communication and collaboration online participating in digital networks for learning and research

  • Death, Spirits and Spirituality (SOCI352)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Educate and critically examine the different sociological and other social scientific theories surrounding issues of death and spirituality Create a sociological awareness, sensitivity and understanding of death and spirituality Develop a global awareness of different death practices, thereby instilling a sense of empathy when it comes to dealing with death Expose students to the different landscapes, spaces and places associated with death and spirits

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify, explain and critique sociological and other social science theories on death and spirituality

    (LO2) Describe and analyse the different ways in which individuals and society make sense of death and the spiritual realm

    (LO3) Show awareness of the ethical issues surrounding the study of death

    (LO4) Apply sociological theories to the study of a culture’s treatment of either death, spirituality or both

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

  • Community and Public Involvement in Crime and Criminal Justice (SOCI369)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To examine how communities/lay publics interact with and are 'involved' in crime control and criminal justice institutions.
    - To subject the underlying rationales for community and public involvement in criminal justice to scrutiny
    - To assess and examine the practice of public participation using the most recent research evidence, including students’ own research evidence should this be possible.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Identify and discuss the key concepts and theories underpinning public involvement in crime and criminal justice policy and practice and apply them in particular policy/institutional settings.

    (LO2) Recognise the significance of social divisions and patterns of inequality for public participation and involvement.

    (LO3) Explain the nature of social relationships between individuals, groups and criminal justice institutions.

    (LO4) Summarise and assess evidence concerning the nature, extent and implications of community and public involvement in crime and criminal justice.

    (S1) Contrast different interpretations of public involvement and community participation, their merits and demerits

    (S2) Gather, synthesise and summarise research evidence

    (S3) Formulate key questions associated with public involvement in crime and criminal justice

    (S4) Organise and present ideas/arguments and draw reasoned conclusions

  • Architecture and Power: Parliaments, Prisons and Courts (SOCI372)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To p rovide students with an introduction to the classic and contemporary social studies of architects, architecture and the built environment (with particular reference to parlaiments, prisons and courts) Encourage reflection on the different methodological and conceptual approaches that underpin such studies; Equip students with the skills to interrogate architecture from a (broadly understood) sociological perspective;

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will be able to situate architecture as a distinctive ‘social production’, and understand its implication in political projects and processes at a variety of levels

    (LO2) You will gain ability to problematize ahistorical and asocial analyses of architecture

    (LO3) You will be able present analysis of a specific architectural project from a coherent sociological perspective

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.