Criminology BA (Hons) Add to your prospectus

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: L311
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : BBB / IB : 30 / BTEC : DDM
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Module details

Programme Year One

The first year of the programme provides an introduction to exploring ‘crime’ in its social, historical and political context. Getting to grips with the key concepts in Criminology and its wider social scientific roots is dealt with at Year One to ensure easy transition to Years Two and Three. Our Studying Society module explores the use of social science research methods and ensures that by the second year all students are fully acquainted with IT and virtual learning tools.

In addition to the compulsory modules, you may also choose 30 credits from the following optional modules:

  • Sociological Theory (30 credits)
  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 1 (15 credits)
  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 2 (15 credits)

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Sociological Theory (SOCI101)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims
  • To introduce key classic and contemporary sociological theories.

  • ​ To give students an appreciation of the relevance of sociological theory in producing knowledge of the social world.

  • ​To support and guide engagement both with a series of canonical sociological texts and the critiques thereof (and with specific respect to their gendered and ethnocentric nature)

  • ​To describe and examine a range of key concepts and theoretical approaches within sociology and evaluate their application in differing contexts

  • Learning OutcomesFamiliarity with key sociological theories and their inter-relation​​An ability to evaluate the respective contribution of specific sociological theories/theorists to the discipline
    ​A capacity to identify and assess the relative merits of sociological theory for the analysis of the social

    ​An appreciation of the complexity and diversity of social life

    ​Competence in using major theoretical perspectives and concepts in sociology, and appreciation of their contribution to knowledge 

  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 1 (SOCI102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims
  • Encourages you to think about history in sociological terms, particularly about the ways in which an understanding of the past can help to illuminate the present.
  • Provides you with an appreciation of continuity and change in social life in Britain, with an emphasis, inter alia, on politics, social policy, the economy, family life, and social and cultural relations.

  • Provides you with an understanding of how different social scientists have studied, described and explained these processes of continuity and change in various areas of social life​.

  • Provides you with a way of putting wider processes of continuity and change in social, cultural, political and historical context​.

  • Provides you with a foundation of theories, concepts and knowledge for study at the second and third years. ​

  • Learning OutcomesEncourages you to  describe processes of social continuity and change over time in various areas of social life from a sociological perspective.

    Encourages you to think critically about what we gain by investigating the links between the present and the past.

    ​Encourages you to apply and evaluate sociological theories and concepts in relation to various conceptual, methodological and empirical issues surrounding the question of history and the analysis of social change in various areas of social life.

    Supports the transition to modules in the second year with knowledge and understanding of key events and debates  in social, political and economic ​life.

  • Social Change and Social Policy in Contemporary Society 2: Changing Inequalities (SOCI103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • To provide students with an appreciation of the main changes that have taken place in British society since 1945, with a particular emphasis on ''race'' and ethnicity, gender and social class.

     

  • ​To provide students with an understanding of how sociologists have studied, described and explained these changes.

  • Learning Outcomes

    to describe and explain some of the main social changes that have taken place in British society since 1945 by drawing upon sociological studies. 

    ​to discuss the inter-relationship between ''race'', ethnicity, class and gender and understand the influence of these on society.

    to evaluate different sociological concepts and theories and relate these to broader historical, social and political contexts.
  • Studying Society (SOCI106)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    AimsTo introduce students to the field of social enquiry and its proper objects of studyTo introduce students to the principles and process of social researchTo introduce students to strategies for finding, accessing and evaluating sources of informationTo introduce students to basic methods and techniques of data production and analysisTo introduce students to basic techniques for presenting and communicating information effectively 
    Learning OutcomesAn understanding of the nature of social enquiry and its objects of attentionAn understanding of key principles in social researchAn understanding of the social research processAn ability to find and access existing sources of informationAn ability to critically evaluate sources of information and knowledge claimsAn ability to produce and analyse both qualitative and quantitative data effectively

    An ability to present and communicate information and findings of research in an effective manner

  • Introduction to Crime and Society (SOCI107)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims
  • To provide an introduction to sociological criminology

  • To introduce concepts and frameworks through which the nature, extent and ‘causes’ of crime have been conceptualised

  • To consider how crime is constructed, perceived and responded to within society

  • To explore the inter-relationships between crime, social problems and their context

  • Learning Outcomes

    Explain how crime is constructed as a social problem.

    Discuss some of the main ways in which sociologists and academic criminologists have sought to explain ‘crime’.

    Distinguish the approaches taken by sociological criminologists and compare them to other approaches (such as common-sense).

    Comment on the relationship between theories of crime and popular, media and/or policy-responses.

    Situate discussions of crime and criminalisation within an understanding of social divisions in contemporary society.

  • Controlling Crime - An Introduction (SOCI108)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • To provide an introduction to the main institutions of criminal justice

  • To explore and reflect critically on key concepts and debates about criminal justice responses to crime and victimisation

  • To raise awareness about how crime and victimisation are constructed in by agents and practices of crime control

  • An appreciation of the range of responses to crime and deviance and an ability to interpret the values and practices of the agencies which administer them.

  • Learning OutcomesFamiliarity with key institutions of the criminal justice system, their roles and context (historical/social).An understanding of relevant criminal justice concepts, debates and approaches and be able to employ these to reflect critically on criminal justice institutions.

    ​Discuss the social and historical origins and development of the main institutions of crime and justice alongside new and emergent forms of crime control including the police, courts, and policy measures. 

Programme Year Two

In the second year, the core modules provide a deeper coverage of the range of criminological knowledge and particular controversies in criminal justice practice. We also explore the role of the criminologist in the world of policy and activism in modules such as Understanding Crime, Justice and Punishment, Policing, Crime and Social Control and Punishment, Penalty and Prisons. Students will also study Social Research Methods 1 and 2.

Optional modules currently include:

  • Social Exclusion
  • Beyond Crime: Culture, Power and Harm
  • Domestic and International Drug Policy
  • Understanding Non-Profit Organisations: Work Based Learning

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Understanding Policing and the Police (SOCI241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims
    • To introduce some key concepts, topics anddebates in the sociology of policing and the police
    • To provide an overview of the historicaldevelopment of modern police organisations
    • To examine critically the role, function and conduct of police organisations, including the significance of the idea of ''cop culture''
    • To discuss and debate the significance of different social divisions and inequalities for understanding policing ​
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Be able to recognise and comment upon the significance of different accounts of the emergence of modern police organisations, and of their role and function in society​ 

    ​Be able to identify some of the different institutions which are involved in contemporary policing, and demonstrate an awareness of some of the challenges posed by an increasingly plural policing environment​​

    ​Be able to explain and critically evaluate the idea that there is a distinctive ‘cop culture’​

    ​Be able to recognise and comment upon the relevance of key social divisions (including class, gender and race) for thinking about policing and police organisations​

    ​Demonstrate an awareness of issues of police governance and accountability, including the significance of human rights​

  • Understanding Crime, Justice and Punishment (SOCI244)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
  • To critically explore the main sociological and criminological perspectives on crime, justice and punishment 

  • ​To investigate the historical emergence of theoretical thought in relation to crime and subsequent development within particular perspectives

  • ​To critically assess and the strengths and limitations of particular concepts associated with different theoretical perspectives

  • ​To explore how key theoretical concepts and ideas relate to criminal justice practice

  • ​To critically understand these perspectives as they relate to social divisions (class, ‘race’, gender, sexuality and age)

  • Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate critical awareness of the historical and contemporary significance of criminological concepts deployed to explain crime, justice and punishment 

    ​Exhibit understanding of the ways in which crime, justice and punishment are contested within and outside of academic thinking

    ​Distinguish between different conceptual frames of reference and compare and contrast their strengths and weaknesses

    ​Situate theoretical thought within the world of policy and criminal justice practice

    ​Demonstrate how criminal justice theory and practice intersect with social fractures, inequalities and social divisions

  • Quantitative Social Research Methods (SOCI247)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • To introduce students to the usage of quantitative data and methods in explaining the social world

  • To encourage students to reflect on the issues raised in attempting to gain reliable knowledge regarding the social world

  • To give students practical experience of working with and appropriately analysing data relevant to their studies​

  • ​To encourage reflection on the strengths and limitations of using quantitative data in the social sciences

  • To prepare students for independent research using a range of quantitative data

  • Learning Outcomes Assess the strengths and limitations of ''real-world'' usage of quantitative data

    Assess claims made about the nature of the social world based on quantitative data and establish their quality​

    Produce independent analysis based on a range of quantitative data sources​

    Appropriately present quantitative data​

    Use specialist statistical analysis software​

    Appreciate the range of quantitative ​data available for social research

  • Qualitative Social Research Methods (SOCI248)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  •  Introduce students to a range of research methods used in sociological research.

  • ​To give stduents some practical experience of data collection, analysis and presentation.

  • ​To encourage students to think about the ethical, epistemological and
    practical considerations of designing a research study and conducting social
    research.

  • To reflect on the role of the researcher in collecting and generating data.

  • Learning Outcomes

    Select a research method to inform a particular research area/ research questions.

    Analyse and present primary qualitative data.

    ​Consider the ethical implications of their research, and demonstrate a good understanding of situated field ethics.

    Reflect critically on their role as a researcher and demonstrate and awareness of the socio-political context of research.

  • Punishment, Penality and Prisons: Critical Debates (SOCI254)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • To provide a broad overview of the historical, theoretical and comparative foundations of punishment and imprisonment nationally and internationally.

  • ​​​​To examine the experiences and outcomes of imprisonment for identifiable groups of prisoners including: children and young people; women; black and minoritised people; older people.

  • ​To introduce a range of key debates and controversies surrounding the questions of punishment, penality and prisons in ‘modern’ societies and to subject them to social scientific interrogation.

  • Learning Outcomes

    An understanding of the trajectory of state policy responses in respect of punishment, penality and prisons (particularly in the UK) from the early nineteenth century to the present.  

    An ability to critically analyse the competing theoretical rationales for the practices of modern punishment, penality and imprisonment including: constructions of moral responsibility; deterrence; retribution; rehabilitation; reform; deserts; proportionality; incapacitation.

    ​A familiarity with the contemporary politics of imprisonment and comparative penal regimes.

    ​A grasp of the impact of imprisonment on prisoners in general and specific groups of prisoners in particular.

    A capacity to critically assess the legitimacy of prisons together with alternative, penal reductionist and abolitionist perspectives.

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Social Exclusion (SOCI205)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims
  • To explore and evaluate the theory and practice of social exclusion as it relates to class, ''race'', disability, sexual orientation and gender

  • To consider the impact of social policy on exclusion and policy options/strategies for the future

  • To evaluate the theory and practice of social action as a response to social exclusion

  • To explore the intersectionality of different groups'' experiences ​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Distinguish and apply different theoretical approaches to social exclusion

    Evaluate policy responses and social action to counter social exclusion

    Situate the relationship between exclusion and other forms of social stratification

  • Understanding Non-profit Organisations: Work-based Learning (SOCI212)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  •  To engage in 48hrs of volunteering with a non-profit organisation

     

  • ​Make connections between the placement experience and organisational theory, social policies, and practice

  • ​To foster experimental learning requiring you to reflect on your placement experience and learning

  • To assist you in bridging the gap between the workplace and your academic studies

  • Learning Outcomes

    Have made a contribution to a non-profit organisation by working as a volunteer for a minimum of 48 hrs.

     

    ​ Understand discourses related to volunteering

    ​ Understand the interface between the host organisation and social policies

    ​ Understand the service offered by the organisation in the context of the welfare mix

    ​Be able to make a poster presentation and reflect on their actions and learning

    Apply organisational theory to practice within the host organisation​

  • Understanding Digital Culture & Society (SOCI213)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To encourage and enable students to think critically about the place of technology in society

    To introduce students to key theories of the digital ageTo introduce students to key debates regarding the implications of digitisation in social, political, economic, and cultural life To encourage and enable students to reflect critically on their own digital lives and practice
    Learning Outcomes

    ​A critical understanding of the place of technology in society

    ​An understanding of key theories of the digital age

    ​An understanding of key debates regarding the implications of digitisation in social, political, economic, and cultural life

    ​An ability to reflect critically on one’s own digital life and practice

  • Urban Sociology (SOCI236)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims
  • ​To provide an introduction to classical and contemporary social scientific approaches to the study of urban life

  • ​To introduce key classcial and contemporary academic studies of urbanism

  • ​To situate the distinctive contribution made by sociologists to our understanding of cities 

  • ​To critically examine key empirical studies on the social and cultural aspects of city life 

  • Learning Outcomes​ An awareness of the landmark social studies of modern urbanism

      ​An appreciation of the spatial form taken by social inequalities in urban capitalist contexts

      ​Capacity to describe and assess some of the major political interventions in city life in the modern period 

      Understanding of the relationship between theoretical and methodological studies of ​the urban

    • Thinking Sociologically: Approaches to Social Inquiry (SOCI242)
      Level2
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims
    • To introduce students to some of the major theories and perspectives on how social life can be studied and understood

       

    • ​To encourage reflection on the ways in which sociologists seek to approach studies of phenomena, with particular reference to the major philosophical underpinnings of social science relative to knowledge production.

    • ​To give students an appreciation of the ways in which sociologists use theories as a way to support empirical inquiry.

    • To encourage students towards a critical approach to knowledge production and to the distinctive contribution sociology makes therein. ​

    • Learning Outcomes

      An ability to evaluate the contribution of a range of influential thinkers and perspectives on the organization of social action and social structure.

       

      ​Familiarity with major traditions within the philosophy of social science, and the position of key thinkers therein.

      ​A capacity to problematize taken-for-granted accounts of knowledge (relative to both ‘everyday’ and ‘scientific’ understandings).

      ​An appreciation of the relationship between theory and method in the context of some of the major classic and contemporary sociological accounts

    • Deviance, Youth and Culture (SOCI252)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To explore the main academic literature sources relevant to the study of deviance and deviancy.

      ​To examine historical and contemporary debates on deviancy in the UK and beyond.

      ​To examine the different functions and strategies of the media and culture to ‘policing’ youth.

      ​To provide a critical insight into the key cultural practices of deviance.

      ​To identify the form of power that constitutes deviant practices.

      Learning Outcomes

      Use and apply the main sources of deviancy literature for sociological research and analysis of social and political life.

      ​Understand the relationship between deviancy, culture and youth as a contested form of social regulation.

      ​Evaluate the impact and effects of media representations, discourses, ideology and media technologies in the construction of deviance and criminality.

      ​Appreciate and situate cultural practices of resistance as part of the process of social ordering.

      ​Demonstrate the relationship between theory, analysis and interpretation and the skills associated with evaluation and presentation.

    • Culture, Power and Social Change (SOCI256)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
      1. To explore a range of interdisciplinary literature pertinent to social change in order to understand these phenomena as a feature of modern societies.

      2. ​To examine the spaces and social locations that cultural change arises within (for example; in popular media; popular music and subcultural practices)    

      3. ​To highlight the key criminological and sociological debates in and around cultural struggles and how this relates to the process of social change.

      Learning Outcomes

      Understand the main theoretical positions and controversies surrounding the concept of social and cultural change

       

      ​Understand the relationship between social change, deviance, crime, power and social change in modern societies 

      ​Critically evaluate how  practices of social harm cultural struggle may be ‘normalized’ in contemporary societies and how these contests are identified and responded to

      ​Identify spaces and social locations which are reflected and reinforced through cultural practices

      ​Identify a range of social divisions that intersect with cultural  practice – age, ‘race’, gender, class and sexuality

      ​Demonstrate an awareness of the role cultural struggle and change plays in socio-spatial disruptions, social identities, power relations  

    Programme Year Three

    In Year Three, students will have the choice to study specialist subjects in-depth and develop their independent learning. Those who opt for a Dissertation are given freedom to pursue their interest in a topic of their choice, whilst those opting for our Applied Social Research or Social Policy Project module get a chance to combine work experience with academic knowledge. We have considerable experience in combining your research interests with the work needs and aims of local agencies.

    Optional modules currently include:

    • Gender and Crime
    • The Risk Society: Crime, Security and Public Policy
    • Youth, Crime, Youth Justice and Social Control
    • Criminal Evidence
    • The Risk Society
    • Social Control and the City
    • Murderous Cities
    • Criminal Victimisation, Welfare and Policy

    Year Three Compulsory Modules

    • Dissertation 2 (SOCI301)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • Supports you to acquire research skills through independent research and project management by pursuing a substantial research project.
    • ​Supports you to undertake a substantial piece of supervised written work based on research into a topic of your choice.

    • Helps you develop your abilities to plan and manage your own learning.​

    • Facilitates you in developing research skills and provides you with the opportunity to apply your knowledge to a particular topic.​

    • Provides an opportunity to design and carry out substantial independent analysis of data and/or other research materials, whether primary or secondary data or theoretical or methodological arguments.​

    • Enables you to exercise the inter-personal and time management skills required for independent research.​

    • Provides an opportunity to frame and complete a substantial piece of writing.​

    • Learning OutcomesDemonstrate the ability to explore a topic of your own choosing in depth by means of independent research.

      ​Apply your growing critical judgement and powers of analysis to your chosen topic and area of inquiry.

      ​Use skills in project management, critical discrimination and a sense of proportion in evaluating data and evidence for a substantial project.

      Develop a grasp of the literatures which have a bearing on your chosen project.​

      ​Justify the selection and use of your chosen research methods.

      ​Demonstrate the capacity to report back on the research as a whole and what emerged from it through the process of writing up the final dissertation.

    • Interchange Portfolio: Work-based Learning (SOCI303)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To engage you in an extended placement and self-directed learning in partnership with VCO, in which you will complete an agreed project with the external organisation;
    • To allow you on the basis of this placement experience to describe and analyse connections between theory, research, social policy and practice;

    • To foster experiential learning by requiring you to reflect on your placement experience and learning;

    •  To assist you to further develop your understanding of the workplace and bridge the gap between their academic studies and future employment.

    • Learning Outcomes

      Negotiating a learning agreement;

      ​Developing a structured approach to research ethics and risk assessment;

      ​Producing a Client Report for the host VCO;

      ​Understanding the project within other academic work and literature 

      Understanding the nature of VCOs within the local and national policy context

      ​Reflecting on the practical problems which arose during the course of the project, and outlining the solutions adopted for them. You will be able to demonstrate how decisions were revised in the light of these experiences, alongside alternative strategies, and show an understanding of your own role in the project and how it affected others

      Understanding methodology by demonstrating awareness of current debates in sociologicalmethodology and where appropriate being able to apply this to the project

    Year Three Optional Modules

    • Jurisprudence (LAW332)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • This module aims to give students an understanding of the basic problems of jurisprudence.

    • At the same time the module will introduce students to the work of some of the most important authors in legal theory. Particular emphasis will be given to the detailed study of some of the most influential modern legal theorists, H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller, and Ronald Dworkin. ​

    • Students will also be introduced to some of the crucial contemporary concerns of legal philosophy, and in particular, the relationship between the rule of law, rights and democracy.​

    • Learning Outcomes

      To demonstrate a critical knowledge and understanding of the central concerns of jurisprudence; 

      To reflect upon and analyse critically the main arguments in the discourse about the concept of law and its relationship to morality;​

      To demonstrate a critical understanding of models and theories as to the internal structure of law;​

      To demonstrate a critical understanding of the work, in particular, of H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller and Ronald Dworkin;​

      To demonstrate an ability to evaluate competing conceptions of the role of law in a democratic state.​

    • Gender and Crime (SOCI308)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To raise key issues concerning the gendered nature of work on deviance

    • Exploring feminism''s contribution to criminology​

    • Exploring the link between masculinities and crime​

    • Studying the experiences of female offenders​

    • Exploring the experiences of women as victims​

    • Learning Outcomes

      An understanding of the gendered nature of work on deviance 

      An understanding of feminist contributions to the study of criminology 

      Knowledge of key debates within criminology concerning the nature of offending by men and women, the treatment of women in the criminal justice system and women''s victimisation and fear of crime​

    • Social Control and the City (SOCI310)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
    • To understand the main theoretical arguments and debates around social control and surveillance practices.

    • ​To examine the relationship between the urban state power and the development of surveillance practices and social control

    • ​To critically assess the relationship between the prevention of crime, social control and how these impact upon populations defined by class, gender, ''race'' and age

    • To explore social control practices as they impact on uses of space and coneptions of ''place'' 
    • Learning Outcomes

      Grasp the main theoretical debates around social control in the urban context

       

      ​Understand the relationship between city development and the problem of social order

      ​Appreciate the contested nature of both urban social order and the meaning of ''public space''

      ​Critically assess the relationship between crime prevention practices, social control and the constitution of social order in the city

    • Victimisation, Justice and Policy (SOCI319)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To situate current criminal justice policy pre-occupations with the victim of crime within the context of victimological and sociological theorising.

    • To evaluate the contribution of (auto)biographical data for victimology/criminology​

    • ​To map the nature and extent of criminal victimisation and its impact

    • To understand the role of victims’ movements in the formulation of criminal justice policy.

    • Learning Outcomes

      To develop a critical appreciation of the sub-discipline of victimology, its strengths and weaknesses. 

      An ability to appreciate alternative sources of data as a basis for understanding people''s experiences.​

      ​To have a sound, critical knowledge of the nature and extent of crime and its impact

      ​To critically evaluate the efficacy of the concept of the victim and victim-oriented policies within the contemporary cultural context.

    • The Risk Society: Crime, Security and Public Policy (SOCI320)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To investigate the impacts of risk in contemporary society

    • ​To evaluate risk management strategies in the areas of crime, security and welfare

    • To scrutinise the efficacy of social policies designed to reduce risk​

    • ​To explore conceptual and theoretical approaches to risk within the social sciences

    • Learning Outcomes

      Evaluating the impacts of crime, welfare and security risks on lived experience in the contemporary UK

      Identifying and understanding the social and cultural processes which shape the construction of security risks.

      ​Comprehending the relationship between the distribution of health risks and traditional forms of social stratification.

      ​Comparing theories of risk with ethnographic research into the effects of risk on everyday experience.

      ​Understanding policy approaches towards crime and security risks in terms of institutional regulation, legislation and management.

      ​Articulating the links between identity, individualization and reflexivity in contemporary western cultures.

    • Corporate Crime, Law and Power (SOCI321)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims

      To identify the main literature and sources relevant to corporate crime

      ​To identify key historical and contemporary debates in corporate crime research

      ​To explore a range of theoretical explanations for the social production of corporate crime

      ​To develop an understanding of the social representation of corporate crime

      ​To analyse the problems associated with, and prospects for controlling, corporate crime

      Learning Outcomes

      The ability  to identify key sources of data about corporate crime, drawn from a range of disciplines and be able to use these materials for research purposes.

      ​An understanding of the problems of definition, recognition and measurement of corporate crime and how those might be overcome

      ​An understanding of the complex relationships between the law, corporations and power in both historical and contemporary contexts

      ​An understanding of the role of both national and transnational forms of regulation and law enforcement in the production and control of corporate crimes

      ​An ability to analyse corporate crime through the lense of a range of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives 

    • Politics, Society and the State: Classic and Contemporary Ethnographies (SOCI325)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims
    • Provides an overview of ethnographic researchtraditions within the social and political sciences through an exploration ofclassic and contemporary studies.

    • Explores the important contributions of classic and contemporary ethnographic studies to our understanding of politics, society, government and the state.
    • Offer​s an introduction to conducting ethnographic research and analysing the results through lectures, seminars and hands-on experience of small scale fieldwork.

    • Outlines how sustained, in-depth observation and fieldwork, and the ''thick description'' it generates, can be used to establish new ways of thinking about many of the central topics of sociology, social policy, anthropology, political science and beyond: including the state, government, democracy, justice, power, culture, organisation, order, rationality, accountability and risk – and their dark ''others'': dictatorship, injustice, violence, disorganisation, disorder, disaster, irrationality, corruption, venality and greed.

    • Demonstrates clearly that, as students of social and political life, we have as much to learn from studies of African or Native American/First Nation societies of the past as from studies of globalised capitalist societies today.

    • Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate knowledge of the ethnographic traditions that criss-cross social and political studies of government and the ''relationships of rule'' in sociology, social policy, anthropology, political science and many other disciplines.

      ​Describe the pre-20th C precursors of contemporary studies, ''proto-ethnographies'', and the political contexts in which they acquired their power.

      ​Chart some of the different ways in which ethnographic studies of politics, society, government and the state developed over the 20th C up to the present day.

      ​Link ethnographic research to the key theoretical, methodological and political debates which motivate particular kinds of study: from the observational studies of ''the poor'' in the 19th C, through to studies of ''indigenous'' political organisation in the early 20th C, on to the emergence of the new social and political studies of states and governmental practices in the late 20th and early 21st C.

      Reflect on the focus on practices (political practices, policy practices, state and society making practices) as an important link between different kinds of ethnographic study.  

      ​Outline the contributions of ethnographic research to understandings of politics, society and the emergence of new forms of governmental activity.

      Conduct a small-scale observational study of politics-in-action and work evidence up under different theoretical, methodological and analytical frames.​

    • Culture, Economy and Cities (SOCI327)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • Introduce key theories and concepts regarding the interaction between cultural and economic forces within the city

    • Explain the current position of culture within political, economic and urban spheres by tracing their shifting historical inter-relation

    • Reveal the links between urban, economic and cultural development​

    • Learning Outcomes

      Understand the changing relationship between economic organisation and cultural activity

      Engage with, and critique, key theories regarding the role of culture in contemporary cities​

      Critically assess a range of theoretical accounts of the cultural economy​

      Gain an awareness of changes in cultural policy up to the present day, and appreciate the socioeconomic backdrop to these policies​

      Understand the fundamentally social nature of cultural production and consumption​

    • Community and Public Involvement in Crime and Criminal Justice (SOCI369)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To examine how communities/lay publics interact with and are ''involved'' in crime control and criminal justice institutions.
    • To subject the underlying rationales for community and public involvement in criminal justice to scrutiny​

    • To assess and examine the practice of public participation using the most recent research evidence, including students’ own research evidence.​

    • Learning Outcomes

      1. Identify and discuss the key concepts and theories underpinning public involvement in crime and criminal justice policy and practice and apply them in particular policy/institutional settings.

      Recognise the significance of social divisions and patterns of inequality for public participation and involvement.

      Explain the nature of social relationships between individuals, groups and criminal justice institutions.​

      Summarise and assess evidence concerning the nature, extent and implications of community and public involvement in crime and criminal justice.​

    • Architecture and Power: Parliaments, Prisons and Courts (SOCI372)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • To provide students with an introduction to the classic and contemporary social studies of architects, architecture and the built environment (with particular reference to parlaiments, prisons and courts)

    • Encourage reflection on the different methodological and conceptual approaches that underpin such studies;​

    • Equip students with the skills to interrogate architecture from a (broadly understood) sociological perspective; ​

    • Learning Outcomes

      You will be able to situate architecture as a distinctive ‘social production’, and understand its implication in political projects and processes at a variety of levels

      You will gain ability to problematize ahistorical and asocial analyses of architecture

      You will be able present analysis of a specific architectural project from a coherent sociological perspective​

    • Criminal VIctimisation, Welfare & Policy (SOCS319)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
      1. To situate current criminal justice policy pre-occupations with the victim of crime within the context of victimological and sociological theorising.
      2. To evaluate the contribution of (auto)biographical data for victimology/criminology
      3. To map the nature and extent of criminal victimisation and its impact
      4. To understand the role of victims’ movements in the formulation of criminal justice policy.
      Learning Outcomes

      To develop a critical appreciation of the sub-discipline of victimology, its strengths and weaknesses.

      An ability to appreciate alternative sources of data as a basis for understanding people''s experiences.To have a sound, critical knowledge of the nature and extent of crime and its impact

       

      ​To critically evaluate the efficacy of the concept of the victim and victimoriented policies within the contemporary cultural context.

    The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


    Teaching and Learning

    You will be taught through a combination of face-to-face teaching in group lectures and small class sessions, tutorials and seminars, which are supplemented by opportunities to get one-to-one guidance from academic staff during their weekly ‘open office’ hours. The rest of your study time will be spent undertaking directed independent study, making use of our excellent library and IT facilities.

    You will also be supported throughout by an individual Academic Adviser. Learning is delivered in a variety of formats including lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, guided independent study, group work and reflective and experiential learning.

    The primary purpose of lectures is to provide you with a broad introduction to key areas and debates on a given topic pitched at the appropriate level of study. The lectures aim to facilitate your reading and highlight issues to be explored during independent study time in preparation for seminars and assessment.

    Seminars provide opportunities to explore particular issues and debates in greater detail in a way that supplements and builds upon the lectures. Seminars also allow for greater levels of student participation and such participation will be actively encouraged throughout the programme. Workshops frequently follow the format of seminars but they also may be used to develop particular skills in a teaching context. For example, workshops develop skills in data analysis and skills in interviewing.

    Guided independent study may also feature in your learning experience. Group work is a feature of all seminar teaching and group work takes place both with and outside of formal scheduled classes.


    Assessment

    Assessment takes many forms, each appropriate to the learning outcomes of the particular module studied. Most modules are assessed by means  of a mixture of essays and examinations. Typically, a module in Year Two might involve a 4,000 word essay or a 2,500 word essay plus a one hour examination. Some modules are assessed wholly or in part by other appropriate means, such as the preparation of projects and individual or group presentations. The final degree class is based on Year Two and Three marks, weighted in favour  of Year Three marks.