Communication and Media

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: P900
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Applications considered
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Module details

Programme Year One

Everybody who studies with us takes core Communication & Media modules in Year One. One of these focuses on analysing communication and media, while another examines the relationship between media, politics and society. Further modules explore the linguistic aspects of media texts and examine how sound and visuals generate meaning. Besides introducing students to Communication & Media as a subject, our first year is designed to support you as you acquire and practice the academic and analytical skills you will need to succeed as a student and in your chosen career.

Single Honours (100%) students can also take two optional modules from other subjects in the School of the Arts.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Introduction to Communication and Media Analysis (COMM144)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1. This module will introduce you to the analysis of communication and the forms that communication takes i.e., how meaning is created through words, images and sounds, focusing primarily on popular screen media, especially film and television

    2. This module will also introduce some major approaches to media analysis, focusing especially on narrative, stylistic and genre analysis.

    3. This module will also examine the ways in which media communication takes place within a number of contexts, paying particular attention to industrial and economic concerns, the ways in which audiences engage with media and the ways in which media are authored and branded.

    4. This is one of two foundational modules for students seeking to study Communications in years 2 and 3. It is compulsory for everyone except for students doing a minor in Communication.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the role still and moving images play in mass communications along with the ideological implications they have for media messages.

    (LO2) Develop an analytic ability in relation to different kinds of media texts, with particular reference to their narrative, stylistic and generic dimensions.

    (LO3) Understand the ways in which narrative, stylistic and generic choices shape the nature of representation in media texts.

    (LO4) Identify media texts as products of particular economic, industrial, institutional and technological environments.

    (LO5) Understand the most significant components of media texts and the production practices that underlie them, and to analyse these aspects critically.

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) IT skills

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Communication (listening and questioning and respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing presentations).

    (S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity (analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions)

    (S6) Self-management, readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning.

  • Media, Politics and the Everyday (COMM104)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of the relationships between media, politics and society and the ways in which we use media and media use us.

    To develop an understanding of some of the key concepts and theories which seek to explain the communication and mediatisation of public and political life.

    To develop an understanding of the ways in which media operations and news discourse affect the representation of issues such as ethnicity, nationalism, gender, war and terrorism.

    To explore the ways in which the public are becoming both consumers and producers of media texts as well as their subjects, and the implications of new technologies and social media on everyday politics and social life.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to discuss the role the media play in democratic societies.

    (LO2) Students will be able to identify key theories and debates concerning journalistic practices, including what makes news and issues of objectivity, bias and framing.

    (LO3) Students will be able to discuss the role media representations play in generating public perceptions of and responses to significant issues in society.

    (LO4) Students will be able to analyse the ways in which new media technologies are transforming relationships between the public, media and those whom the media depict.

    (LO5) Students will be able to summarise evidence from a range of sources and present well-structured arguments.

    (S1) Proficient use of electronic resources and tools for research as specified and required.

    (S2) Time management, organisation of work, proficient use of English, referencing.

    (S3) Ability to construct and convey a coherent argument in written form.

    (S4) Ability to analyse theories and concepts and apply knowledge.

  • Language and Media (COMM151)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to/seeks to provide students with skills for analysing the linguistic aspects of media texts whilst developing their understanding of other communicative modes in relation to language proper. It will provide a foundation for students to undertake more advanced topics in subsequent modules. It will also create opportunities for specific kinds of Independent Project or Dissertation in the final year of the programme, with a linguistic focus.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learn to identify similarities as well as differences between language modes literally understood and 'language' understood metaphorically when applied to other communicative systems.

    (LO2) Learn to apply linguistically-derived concepts to a range of media texts.

    (LO3) Develop an understanding of theoretical issues within which the study of media language may have a part to play.

    (LO4) Work with other students in a group situation to identify and discuss important communicative/linguistic features in a collectively chosen media text.

    (S1) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

  • Sound, Image and Meaning (COMM152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a foundational understanding of: Notions of influence within work in Communication Studies The role of sound and visuals in signifying meaning in media texts How meaning and influence have been researched, and the difficulties involved in designing successful research in these areas In helping students to develop these types of knowledge and understanding, it seeks to provide skills that can be drawn on in subsequent modules that involve formal analysis of media texts and work on media content and institutional organisation more broadly.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to develop a critical understanding of the role of reader interpretation in helping to determine the meaning of media texts and in guiding responses to them.

    (LO2) Students will be a ble to learn to analyse the ways in which different components of media texts are organised to signify meanings.

    (LO3) Students will be able to gain an introductory understanding of the ways in which meaning and influence have been conceptualised and researched.

    (LO4) Students will be able to practise and develop an ability to apply research, understanding and analysis in seminar and group discussion and in producing coursework.

    (S1) Literacy: application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

Year One Optional Modules

  • Describing English Language (ENGL101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To familiarise students with the structural aspects of language . To raise student awareness of the nature of specific structures, (eg words,sounds) and their contribution to the constitution of the English language.  To enable students to analyse real language data drawing upon relevant theoretical concepts.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts in language study

    (LO2) Be able to discuss some of the main ways in which the academic study of language is conducted

    (LO3) Have a clear understanding of the relationship between the structural aspects of English

    (LO4) Demonstratethe ability to apply relevant theoretical concepts to real language data

    (S1) Problem-solving skills: formulating problems (factual, empirical, theoretical) in precise terms, identifying key issues, and developing the confidence to address challenging problems using a variety of different approaches

    (S2) Investigative skills: searching out and synthesising information stored on paper, electronically or visually and developing skills of independent investigation, interacting with colleagues

    (S3) Communication/ verbal: developing the ability to listen carefully, to present complex information in a clear, concise and sophisticated manner

    (S4) Thinking/ intellectual skills: developing the ability to interpret and present data, critically address complex ideas, construct logical arguments, and use technical language correctly

    (S5) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

    (S6) Self – development skills: developing the ability to work independently, to use their initiative, to organise their time properly and to interact constructively with others

    (S7) Information Technology: developing the ability to use their computing and IT skills to help find, store and interpret information, to produce electronic documents and to use appropriate software confidently

  • Introduction to Film Language (FILM101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the ways in which a film creates meaning, and to provide students with the ability to identify and explain the techniques used by a film-maker and the results obtained;

    To foster a capacity for precise and sophisticated observation, and for intelligent structured discussion of what is observed;

    To develop confidence and intellectual depth in discussion, ability to present information succinctly both orally and in writing;

    To develop students’ knowledge of the formal and technical language of film analysis.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have a working knowledge of thetechnical vocabulary of cinema and be able to produce precise description of the construction of a piece of audiovisual material.

    (LO2) Critically analyse audio visual material in terms of its mise-en-scène, camera-work, editing and soundtechnique, and to indicate how these elements contribute to the understanding of the whole.

    (LO3) Observe and comment on the ways in which these elements may inflect the explicit meaning of the text.

    (LO4) Understand and discuss different techniques of film narrative.

    (LO5) Write in a clear and well-informed way on the construction and meaning of film.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – persuading

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S7) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S8) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S9) Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of a film

  • Hollywood and Europe (FILM103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the history of European and Hollywood cinema;

    ​To foster an understanding of key film texts within their social, historical and industrial contexts;

    ​To develop skills of close analysis of film texts;

    ​To understand the complex and shifting interrelationships between American and European cinema.

     

    Learning Outcomes

    Show a knowledge of the history of European and Hollywood cinema, and in particular, the relationship between the two industries

     

    Demonstrate an understanding of key film tests within their social, historical and industrial contexts

     

    Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of a film

     

    Successfully apply a close reading to films across a range of different national and industrial contexts

     

  • Introduction to Popular Music History (MUSI140)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting45:55
    Aims

    To provide an overview of the development of Anglo-American popular music from the mid-twentieth century onwards.  To examine specific stylistic developments and movements in the period covered by the module.  To introduce general issues and critical perspectives within the field of popular music studies. To consider the relationship between musical, social, economic and technological factors in the music and period in question. To provide students with a grounding in core study skills for HE.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate an understanding of the key features of different styles/genres of popular music.

    (LO2) To identify significant individuals, groups, and events in the development of popular music in the period from the mid-twentieth century onwards.

    (LO3) To demonstrate an understanding of the process of musical development (e.g. the emergence of new genres).

    (LO4) To identify some of the ways in which social, economic and technological factors impact on the production and reception of popular music.

    (LO5) To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in prior leaning outcomes) to original case-study examples.

    (LO6) To bBe able to produce a bibliography in a given format.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral and written)

    (S2) Research skills (identifying relevant material)

    (S3) Comprehension (absorbing and interpreting materal)

    (S4) Critical thinking (synthesis)

    (S5) Writing skills (academic writing, including structure, argument, and referencing)

    (S6) Applied skills (music analysis)

    (S7) IT skills (generic, and via online material)

  • English Language: Variation and Context (ENGL110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To introduce students to language variation and the importance of context in shaping language. To raise student awareness of the communicative purposes served through language use. To equip students with the theoretical tools that will enable them to analyse and interpret a wide range of language data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a clear understanding of language variation and the importance of context in shaping language.

    (LO2) Exhibit knowledge and understanding of the communicative functions of language.

    (LO3) Appreciate the different ways of studying the English language.

    (LO4) Analyse and interpret variation and context in naturally occurring data.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Negotiation skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Following instructions/protocols/procedures

    (S5) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S8) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

    (S9) Personal Organisation skills: developing the ability to undertake self-directed study and learning, manage their time efficiently, and to plan, design and accomplish a significant piece of research or an inquiry, either independently or as a member of a team

  • Introduction to Sound and Music in Audiovisual Media (MUSI170)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To explore music's relationship with film and establish the soundtrack's central role in our interpretation of key elements of this artistic medium.
    To investigate the practicalities of film music composition.
    To engage theoretically with audio-visual modes of discourse.
    To use key theories and ideologies within the field of film music scholarship as a basis for the critical analysis of film sound and music.
    To set a fundamental understanding of the film soundtrack that allows for the further investigation of other components within audio-visual media (such as television, music videos, youtube, videogames).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability to read and discuss key texts in a critical and comparative manner

    (LO2) The ability to apply an interdisciplinary approach to the study of music in audio-visual media

    (LO3) The ability to discuss, together, music/sound, image, and narrative

    (LO4) The ability to utilise appropriate theoretical frameworks in the critical analysis of audio-visual media

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

  • Music As An Industry (MUSI150)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to the range of activities undertaken within the music industries
    To explain the historical and contemporary organisation and functions of record companies
    To outline and discuss issues raised by the relationship between the music industries and the creative industries

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will attain knowledge of the changing contexts of the music industries.

    (LO2) Students will attain knowledge of the different structures and functions of record companies.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate knowledge of how record companies fit into the music business as a whole.

    (LO4) Students will identify and discuss processes through which music is commodified and mediated.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

Programme Year Two

Our Year Two modules offer plenty of options, so you can begin to specialise in the areas which interest you most or which might prove valuable for your  chosen career. For example, you can delve more deeply into film and the entertainment industry, the representation of self and society, or the interplay between global media and war. Or you can explore some of the practices associated with media writing and promotional media. 

(NB: most of our Year Two modules are offered in 15-credit and 30-credit versions so, for simplicity, the list below only includes 30-credit versions).

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Children, Culture and Cinema (COMM214)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To encourage students to explore how norms and values are constructed, reinforced and challenged within children's films.
    To provide insight into the audiences children's films address.
    To encourage students to think about children's and family films beyond innocent entertainment.
    To introduce students to the child as both a consumer and a subject of cinema.
    To explore the relationship between children, culture and cinema.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of children's films and culture.

    (LO2) Students will analyse how norms are constructed in children's cinema.

    (LO3) Students will critically analyse filmic texts and demonstrate this ability through visual and auditory means.

    (LO4) Students will evaluate the main academic debates and concerns around children's cinema.

  • Documentary (COMM231)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    This module seeks to introduce students to ideas about the form and function of documentary work as it has developed internationally since the 1920s in film and later television. Through lectures, screenings, reading and discussion, students will be encouraged to develop an analytical knowledge of:
    • The range of purposes claimed for documentary work.
    • Key forms and approaches employed at different moments in the history of documentary.
    • Relationships between documentary work and the 'real world' to which it refers.
    • Issues of 'truthfulness' and the ethics of documentary representations.
    • Documentary-makers' strategies to appeal to audiences or yield responses from them.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a critical awareness of debates surrounding the representation of 'the real' in film and television texts.

    (LO2) Demonstrate familiarity with and understanding of the terms and concepts used in describing and evaluating documentary work in film and television.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a familiarity with and understanding of key visual and verbal components of documentary organisation.

    (LO4) Demonstrate the ability to read and critically evaluate film and television texts based on real subjects.

    (S1) Proficient use of electronic resources and tools for research as specified and required.

    (S2) Time management, organisation of work, proficient use of English, referencing.

    (S3) Analysis of film and television texts; understanding and application of appropriate terminology and criteria.

    (S4) Understanding and analysis of ethical obligations of documentary film-makers.

  • Feminist Media Studies: Texts and Audiences A (COMM204)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    1.     To introduce students to key concepts and debates relating to gender and the media. 2.     To provide students with the opportunity to reflect on the relationship between gender and media and ways of disrupting normative gender constructions. 3.     To assess and examine specific theories of the relationship between media texts and their audiences. 4.     To give students practical experience of designing and carrying out audience research amongst their peers.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to recognise the ways that women and menare treated differently in mainstream media.

    (LO2) Students should know and be able to discuss research on various aspects of the relationship between gender and media.

    (LO3) Students should gain a good understanding of the key methodsused in audience research.

    (LO4) Students will be able to design and carry out a piece ofqualitative audience research

    (S1) Communication (oral, written)

    (S2) Academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem-solving

    (S4) Research skills

    (S5) Working in groups and teams

  • Global News, Media and War (COMM212)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To examine the interplay between global news, media and war in the context of rapidly evolving communication technologies and journalistic practices.

    To compare and contrast the contexts and challenges in which journalists operate across the world.

    To trace the evolution of foreign reporting.

    To explore and analyse media management approaches and audience responses to the reporting of distant conflict.

    To assess and examine the differing ways in which media coverage frames war and humanitarian crisis and the theoretical perspectives that underpin such frames.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to define and critically evaluate key theories and concepts that explain the interplay between global news, media and war.

    (LO2) Students will be able to discuss the current state of media freedom and journalistic practices around the world as well as the main contextual factors that influence those practices and the role journalists play both in the global South and in the global North.

    (LO3) Students will be able to identify and analyse the history and ethics of foreign correspondence and explore the key factors that have contributed to the evolution and decline of foreign correspondence.

    (LO4) Students will be familiar with and critically analyse different perspectives on the way states manage and audiences relate and react to distant conflict.

    (LO5) Students will be able to articulate knowledge and a critical understanding of the historical shifts and continuities in war reporting in the modern era.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations.

    (S3) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning.

    (S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S5) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information.

  • Immersive Media and VIrtual Worlds A (COMM210)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    T o introduce students to the histories of immersive media and virtual world forms. To introduce students to theories and conceptual approaches to immersion, digital realism, cognition and simulation. To encourage students to develop advanced textual analysis skills in relation to virtual images. To encourage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of the industry contexts in which immersive experience and virtual worlds are produced and consumed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the histories and theories of immersive experiences and virtual realities and worlds.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate the capacity to develop critical insight and textual analysis skills of virtual reality texts.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate and accurate terminology and concepts when explaining immersive and virtual reality technologies.

    (S3) Teamwork.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the industrial and entertainment contexts around, and uses of, immersive experiences and virtual realities.

    (S1) Problem solving skills.

    (S2) Commercial awareness.

    (S4) Organisational skills.

    (S5) Communication skills.

    (S6) International awareness.

  • Media, Self and Society (COMM235)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To critically examine key debates and perspectives relating to issues of selfhood, body and identity in a global media age.

    To develop critical insights into the construction, consumption and regulation of selfhood and identity in a global media age.

    To develop critical insights into the impacts of digital cultures and technologies on practices of selfhood and identity in a global media age.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A critical awareness of debates and perspectives relating to issues of selfhood, body and identity.

    (LO2) To gain understandings and knowledge of some of the key concepts used in theoretical approaches to media, self and society in the media and cultural studies literature.

    (LO3) To demonstrate knowledge of issues and debates relating to selfhood and the media.

    (LO4) To critically apply knowledge of these issues and debates to specific examples and case studies.

    (LO5)

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning.

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations.

    (S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics.

  • Preparing for A Year in Industry (COMM260)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to prepare students for a smooth transition into a year in industry and, more broadly, to develop lifelong skills, attitudes and behaviours that will help students lead flexible, fulfilling careers and enable them to contribute meaningfully to society.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will analyse a range of employment and enterprise opportunities in the communications and media industries.

    (LO2) Students will compare the process of applying for two placements/internships/jobs including researching industries and opportunities, and evaluating application and selection processes.

    (LO3) Students will evaluate the development of their professional skills, attitudes and behaviours using reflective thinking and writing.

    (LO4) Students will propose an authentic solution to a commercial or cultural challenge experienced by an employer.

    (S1) Career and identity management online: managing digital reputation and online identity.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning: Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations

    (S3) Information literacy online.

    (S4) Positive attitude/ self-confidence. A can-do approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openess to new ideas and the drive to make these happen.

    (S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S6) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S7) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

  • Public Relations Cultures and Writing Practices A (COMM232)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of the module are to enhance critical understanding of PR industries, contexts and practices  as part of promotional culture and to develop practical skills which enhance employability for students wishing to work within PR, media writing and related communication fields. The first block provides students with an understanding of the historical development of PR in the West including its part in the growth of neoliberal capitalism and branded cultures, and enables critical reflection on its relationship with the wider reporting media and its industries. Further, the course aims to provide students with knowledge of mainstream and alternative organisations’ perspectives on the role of public relations in building images, reputations and brands as part of wider promotional activities, and on the ways they approach the practice of media writing. The second block develops knowledge and experience of media writing skills including those associated with PR such as news releases and media packs, and those associated with journalism such as news and feature writing. The course aims to support students to develop practical skills though critical engagement with theoretical frameworks and tools, case study analysis and practical exercises. The module also aims to develop student understanding of legal, regulatory and professional frameworks associated with PR, media writing and journalism and the role of social media and networked journalism in the contemporary communications workplace.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Critical understanding of PR cultures, theory and practice.

    (LO2) Understanding of teamwork and presentation skills.

    (LO3) Understanding of professional frameworks for PR, media writing and journalism.

    (LO4) Practical skills in persuasive and journalistic media writing.

    (LO5) Understanding of workplace cultures and practice, and what it means to be a creative professional in the PR or media writing industries.

    (S1) Academic writing.

    (S2) Media writing.

    (S3) Critical thinking.

    (S4) Creativity.

    (S5) Teamwork.

  • Global Hollywood: From Film Art to Media Entertainment (COMM201)
    Level2
    Credit level30
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aims of this module are:
    To introduce students to the role played by the Hollywood film industry in the development of modern trans-national entertainment networks.
    To enable students to understand the relationship between film style (aesthetics) and structures of industrial organization at various points in Hollywood's history.
    To provide students with an understanding of the ways in which national / cultural identities in Hollywood films relate to changing industrial and social contexts of film production and consumption.
    To help students understand recent debates about media convergence and the globalisation of media entertainment.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be familiar with a number of terms and concepts used in film criticism and analysis.

    (LO2) Students will have developed an understanding of the role played by US films in mobilising social and cultural identities, especially around particular formations of nationality and gender.

    (LO3) Students will have the ability to identify the commercial imperatives of film and television texts.

    (LO4) Students will be able to demonstrate how economic, industrial and institutional factors shape film and television texts.

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S5) Commercial awareness.

    (S6) Communication skills.

  • Working in Music Industry (MUSI252)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    • To identify the skills necessary to advance careers, whether as a musician or within a music company of some kind.
    • To inform student musicians of ''what to expect'' should they pursue music as a career into the future.
    • To introduce students who might want to work in music industry of the types of specialisms available to them and the role demands of each specialism.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate occupational skills and professional preparation in the context of the contemporary music industry.

    (LO2) Apply generic and discipline-specific skills in the development of professional presentation materials.

    (LO3) Respond to employment and enterprise opportunities within the music industries

    (LO4) Demonstrate the skills required to apply for a music industries related job.

    (S1) Learning and Study Skills.

    (S2) Research Skills.

    (S3) Information and Digital Literacy.

    (S4) Employability Skills.

    (S5) Writing Skills.

    (S6) Applied Skills.

    (S7) Maths Skills.

  • Music in Gaming (MUSI273)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an overview of technological development and a basic (non-technical) appreciation of how sound and music are generated via gaming software/hardware; and to understand the role of the former in determining compositional design across different 'generations' of gaming hardware.

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between music and gaming contexts (eg genre, narrative function, immersion, emotion, and character portrayal).

    To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between game-music and other forms of music (eg orchestral styles, film music, popular music in compiled tracks).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of gaming hardware/software and the extent to which this determines, by limiting or affording, the incorporation of sound/music.

    (LO2) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between music in gaming and other gameplay factors (such as narrative, immersion, game-cues).

    (LO3) To demonstrate an awareness of broader critical, cultural, and ludomusicological issues, as presented and discussed in both historical and contemporary scholarship.

    (LO4) To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes) to original case-study examples.

    (S1) Communication skills.

    (S2) Research skills.

    (S3) Comprehension.

    (S4) Critical thinking.

    (S5) Writing skills.

    (S6) Applied skills.

    (S7) IT skills.

  • Introduction to Music Psychology (MUSI290)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce and explore a set of multidisciplinary topics central to the field of music psychology
    • To allow students to gain a broad understanding of how music influences listeners in everyday contexts and the essential physiological and psychological mechanisms and processes involved in different kinds of music-related activities
    • To appraise existing scholarship in the field of music psychology and be able to argue how the theoretical and empirical issues are connected
    • To become familiar with research methods commonly utilised by music psychologists

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire general and specific knowledge on various topic areas in the multidisciplinary field of music psychology and develop new perspectives on how the human mind processes and responds to music.

    (LO2) Students will be able to critically evaluate existing scholarship in the field and demonstrate awareness of the relationship between theoretical and empirical contributions to music psychology.

    (LO3) Students will be familiar with music psychology research and how it helps understanding the uses of music in everyday life.

    (LO4) Students will be able to integrate literature and research into a logical argument and communicate (orally and textually) effectively and appealingly presenting research findings to a lay audience.

    (S1) Intellectual skills (curiosity, research and exploration, critical understanding, analytical demonstrations).

    (S2) Creative and re-creative skills (presentation, interpretation).

    (S3) Information technology and media literacy.

    (S4) Teamwork and collaboration.

    (S5) Oral and written presentation skills.

  • Propaganda and Censorship (FILM202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an insight into the interaction of film and political authority, the structures which the authorities use or have used in order to exert control on the cinema and the ways in which cinema’s power over its audience has been harnessed, manipulated or occasionally feared to the point of suppression;

    To examine specific films, scenes from them and the controversies around them as case studies of the interaction of film and political and /or other authority;

    To introduce students to theoretical debates about propaganda and censorship in Film Studies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a differentiated understanding of the way in which political and other authorities have sought to control, harness and curb the power of film in different historical situations.

    (LO2) Students will gain an awareness of film’s position in national institutional structures and the effect of these onthe finished product and a historical perspective on the perceived purpose of and limits on film production in Europe.

    (LO3) Students will develop an alertness to the ways in which film may seek to manipulate the viewer and a critical attitude to the theories that have been constructed regarding the effects of film on its audience.

    (LO4) Students will develop an ability to use different kinds of textual evidence to present a balanced and sophisticated argument about complex issues of representation and control and to reach a reasoned conclusion recognising the power of social attitudes and desires in the formulation and conduct of debates in these fields.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Sound, Technology, and Society (MUSI241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the connections between popular music and technology from a variety of historical and theoretical perspectives. To examine how the introduction of new technologies has affected the stylistic development of individual popular music genres and the cultures associated with them.  To examine the interplay between new technologies and the music industry. To develop listening skills with particular emphasis on recorded texts

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understanding of the major theoretical approaches to the study of popular music and technology

    (LO2) Ability to identify significant developments in instrumental technology, production equipment/techniques and distribution technologies.

    (LO3) Ability to demonstrate developed listening skills in relation to recorded production techniques and instrumentation

    (LO4) Ability to identify some of the ways in which technological factors and the social uses of technology impact on the production and reception of popular music

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S2) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Promotion, Identity and Creative Labour (MUSI244)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Provide students with an introduction to promotion and marketing practices relating to contemporary popular music.

    Encourage self-reflexivity on students' own creative practice.

    Develop students' critical thinking around popular music and identity.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate skills in popular music promotion and marketing.

    (LO2) Analyse with a developed conceptual grasp current promotional strategies as employed within the music industries.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a developed understanding of issues around popular music and identity.

    (LO4) Critically engage with academic research relating to popular music identity, promotion and marketing.

    (LO5) Apply the critical skills developed throughout the module to their own creative practice.

    (S1) Adaptability.

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Communication skills.

    (S4) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media.

    (S5) Career and identity management online managing digital reputation and online identity.

  • Music in World Cinema (MUSI270)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    - To study the musical practices of film traditions outside the Anglophone world and their cultural contexts, with particular emphasis on comparisons to classical Hollywood practice - To build on knowledge acquired in first year modules on world music and music in audio-visual media - To develop students' abilty to think and write about music in audio-visual contexts

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to demonstrate familiarity with ideas about music and film in several other cultures.

    (LO2)  Ability to explain the relationship between theory and the cultural context in which it has arisen, as well as the challenges of applying theories to texts from cultures outside that context.

    (LO3) Ability to deploy comparative and cross-cultural perspectives in the understanding of the relationships between music and film as well as their cultural contexts

    (LO4) Higher level analytical and essay-writing skills, including Higher level analytical and essay-writing skills, including more advanced argumentation and handling difficult bibliographic challenges.

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

  • The Cinematic City (FILM201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To explore ways in which European cinema has made use of the urban space (cinema having been described as an urban art-form par excellence ); Through a wide range of films from different European countries, to introduce students both to issues relating to the imaginary conception of cities, and to concepts in film theory regarding the construction of space, the position of the observer, and the nature and purpose of representation and of narrative construction;

    To introduce students to relatively complex theoretical constructions, in an immediate and approachable way, which will give them confidence in their ability to handle concepts in critical theory and to apply them successfully;

    To develop their capacities in expressing their ideas, both in discussion and in written work, with regard to more advanced material than they were required to study in the first-year module;

    To alert them to the conceptual links which film studies has with other theoretical fields; To introduce students in a simple way to the practical problems of audiovisual representation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Awareness of issues of urban theory, of the spatial implications of cinematic expression, and of the interaction of these;

    (LO2) Awareness of the ways in which cinema has been used to articulate the self-construction of urban societies

    (LO3) Alertness to the ways in which the modern world is constructed through representations

    (LO4) Ability to handle theoretical concepts confidently in written and oral modes, to carry on a discussion and sustain an argument by applying those concepts.

    (LO5) Awareness of some of the practical issues involved in creating an audiovisual piece.

    (LO6) Ability to plan the translation of experience of the city into audiovisual form.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S6) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S7) Handling audiovisual material

Programme Year Three

Your final year offers an even wider range of options, designed to provide opportunities to specialise further in your chosen areas of the subject and to strengthen your employability and research skills. Some modules encourage you to deepen your understanding of the topics studied in Year Two, but you can also learn to study magazines and design your own, develop skills in planning and producing online videos, or explore how media represent young people, celebrity or diverse cultures, for example. Many of our students choose to undertake a piece of sustained, original research either by taking the Dissertation module or by completing a briefer original research project as part of the Independent study project module. You can utilise our links with local employers to apply the skills you have learned within a practical context by taking our Work placement module.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • American Independent Cinema (COMM316)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the industrial and economic conditions that have given birth to independent films, especially in the post-1980 period.   To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the aesthetic choices and representational strategies filmmakers of independent films have made and how those might differ from choices and strategies associated with dominant aesthetic and representational regimes.   To examine the ways in which American independent cinema represents a distinct mode of filmmaking from mainstream Hollywood by exploring the relationship of a number of independent films to broader social, cultural, political and ideological landscapes such as Reaganite politics, the politics of counter-culture, racial and gender politics, etc.  

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the debates that have surrounded the concept of independence in American cinema.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the manner in which independent film has been mobilised to respond to particular economic and social-cultural changes in the United States.

    (LO3) Students will be able to identify the key aesthetic choices employed in a number of such films and the ways in which they differ from dominant regimes of representation.

    (LO4) Students will be able to understand American independent cinema as an industrial product determined by a specific mode of production and circulation/distribution.

    (S1) Commercial awareness.

    (S2) Problem solving skills.

    (S3) Teamwork.

    (S4) Organisational skills.

    (S5) Communication skills.

    (S6) IT skills.

  • Dissertation (COMM401)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To facilitate students to construct an extended and original research project on an appropriate topic which is clear and realistic in scope and seeks to make a distinct contribution both to your own learning and to debates within your chosen field.

    To facilitate students to develop independent research skills.

    To facilitate students to develop professional standards for the presentation of research material.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a deep knowledge and understanding of their chosen topic and a critical awareness of the relationship of their own research to other work in the field.

    (LO2) Students will identify and apply research methods which are appropriate for their project.

    (LO3) Students will apply core theoretical and conceptual approaches in the study of communication and media in order to construct a coherent and sustained argument as appropriate to the research project and method of enquiry.

    (LO4) Students will present research information and argument in an appropriate form and to a professional standard, applying recognised academic methods of referencing to bibliographic material.

    (S1) Proficient use of electronic resources and tools for research as required by the chosen research project.

    (S2) Time management, organisation of work, proficient use of English, referencing.

    (S3) Understanding and application of appropriate terminology and analytical criteria.

    (S4) Identifying and accessing relevant sources of information and materials.

  • Independent Study Project (COMM319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop independent learning activities in the field of the communication and media studies.

    To enhance students' knowledge and understanding of the world of media through a personal exploration of a topic in communication and media studies

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to formulate a research project in the area of communication and media studies.

    (LO2) Be able to demonstrate how a research methodology influences the shaping of a research project.

    (LO3) Be able to produce a substantial research-led, written piece of work following standard academic convention.

    (LO4) Be able to critically engage with a range of critical, conceptual or historical insights which are produced by different perspectives in communication and media studies research.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis.

    (S2) Time and project management - Project planning.

    (S3) Time and project management - Project management.

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S5) Information skills - Information accessing: locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources.

    (S6) Research skills - All Information skills.

    (S7) Skills in using technology - Information accessing.

    (S8) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding.

    (S9) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations.

    (S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Self-efficacy (self-belief/intrinsic motivation).

  • Issues in 'cult' Television (COMM300)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an understanding of the historical development of the idea of ‘cult TV’ and the canon of texts associated to it.

    To give students the opportunity to engage in debates about what constitutes ‘cult television’.

    To provide students with knowledge about cult fandom and contemporary cult texts in the context of the development of the US and UK television industries.

    To develop students critical and theoretical capabilities by analysing cult television texts through intersecting issues including genre, identity politics, promotional culture and the role of industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the overall make-up of the UK and US television industries including key debates about changes in the industry and relationships to the politics of representation through the prism of cult TV.

    (LO2) An ability to critique cult television texts and their forms in terms of genre, history, identity politics and industrial perspectives.

    (LO3) An ability to both deconstruct, and write, journalistic pieces about cult TV.

    (LO4) An understanding of the promotional and branding practices associated with cult TV.

    (S1) Researching and locating materials through the effective use of library and information services, bibliographies and electronic sources of knowledge and information.

    (S2) Critical evaluation of academic and cult TV texts.

    (S3) Academic writing.

    (S4) Creative thinking and writing techniques.

    (S5) Time management and project planning.

  • Issues in Photography (COMM323)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to:

    • Develop students’ ability to read, discuss and write critically about the photographic image, by recognising its aesthetic components, its role in memory politics, and the ethics of the photographic gaze and consumption.

    • Provide students with an introduction to the history of photography, from the daguerreotype to the digital photograph.

    • Examine key theoretical frameworks and contemporary debates on photographs of suffering and human rights violations.

    In helping students to develop their understanding and evaluation of photographic texts, the module seeks to enhance their critical and analytic skills, as well as their comprehension of the social and ideological discourses photography participates in more broadly.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The capacity to identify the components of a photographic image; its different private and public uses; and its historical changes.

    (LO2) The ability to discuss relevant theories, debates and key concepts in the analysis of photographs.

    (LO3) A critical awareness of the impact of photography in key events related to the violation of human rights that took place during the second half of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

    (S1) Research-related skills — locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources.

    (S2) Literacy skills — oral literacy, including listening and questioning; the application of literacy demonstrated through the ability to produce clear, structured written work.

    (S3) Problem solving/critical thinking skills — analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S4) Ethical awareness — identify and utilise international/global perspectives as professionals and citizens, consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture.

  • Media and Campaigning (COMM302)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to equip students with knowledge and understanding of the role of the media in in electoral campaigns.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To become aware of the history of campaigns and the media.

    (LO2) To gain a knowledge of the role the media plays in the shaping of political opinions and political outcomes.

    (LO3) To be aware of these effects within the broader context of the forces that affect electoral outcomes.

    (LO4) To be able to critique the media coverage of elections and the potential effects of this on politics and democracy.

    (LO5) To understand how electoral campaign media is regulated.

    (S1) Learning and Study Skills.

    (S2) Information Literacy Skills.

    (S3) Communication Skills.

    (S4) Analytical Skills.

    (S5) Ability to analyse theories and concepts and apply knowledge.

  • Media and Human Rights (COMM317)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To examine key debates relating to the interaction between news media and human rights. To subject the underlying rationale for media representation and reporting of critical human rights issues to scrutiny. To assess and examine specific cases of media and human rights interaction.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be familiar with the key theories of human rights and the development of international norms of human rights.

    (LO2) Students will be familiar with political and institutional structures involved in addressing human rights.

    (LO3) Students will be familiar with the historical and current changes in the relations between media and human rights.

    (LO4) Students will be able to understand and explore a range of salient media issues which relate specifically to the definition, construction, protection or abuse of human rights.

    (LO5) Students will acquire in-depth knowledge, using case studies of specific issues that are problematising and, at times, re-defining the relations between media and human rights.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation.

    (S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S5) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources].

    (S6) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

  • Media, Culture and the City (COMM320)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide an introduction into the different ways that cities and urban life are represented, experienced, and engaged with as spaces of culture.

    To explore the mediation of cities from a number of strategic perspectives, encompassing both representations of cities 'in media' (e.g. film, advertising, maps, museum displays) and media 'in cities' (e.g. billboards /urban screens, locating filming, mobile and 'locative' screen media).

    To introduce students to a wide range of key perspectives and debates on cites from across the film, media and cultural studies literature.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of some of the core theories and concepts on cities and urban space in the media and cultural studies literature.

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand and apply these theories to specific examples and case studies.

    (LO3) Students will be familiar with debates on the role of culture in processes of urban regeneration and renewal.

    (LO4) Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the impact of digital cultures and technologies in shaping perceptions, experiences and the consumption of cities.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

  • Mediating the Past (COMM339)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to provide students with an advanced understanding of key issues relating the representation and mediation of cultural heritage and memory. The module will enable students to acquire both theoretical and practical insights into the mediation of heritage and memory. The module will provide students with a broad knowledge of the range of practices and discourses of cultural heritage, from the broadcast media, to museums, and archives and archival practices. The module will provide students with practical research skills in observing, as part of a heritage/museum field trip.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of key theories and debates on media, heritage and cultural memory.

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand and apply these theories and debates to specific examples and case studies linked to the media and heritage industries.

    (LO3) Students will gain insights into museum practices and exhibition curation.

    (LO4) Students will be able to demonstrate practical research and dissemination skills relating to media, heritage and cultural memory.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills).

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking.

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation.

  • News Media and Society (COMM301)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To examine the structures and dynamics of news productionand reception

    To critically assess the professional practices andideologies of journalists in democratic contexts

    To examine the effectiveness and quality of journalism in avariety of specific cases

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students will gain a good understanding of the democraticrole and performance of journalists in contemporary society

    ​Students will possess a good understanding of key theoriesand perspectives within the sociology of news

    ​Students will be able to discuss contemporary perspectiveson journalism and how social, political, economic and technological changes areaffecting the way news is produced and consumed


    Students will be able to apply wider theories about newsproduction and representation to analyse a range of particular issues or cases

  • Queer Film, VIdeo and Documentary (COMM305)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to queer theory and queer politics through the history and analysis of the production and reception of moving images. To encourage students to develop advanced moving image analysis skills and use them to differentiate between the forms and practices of film, video and documentary. To introduce key concepts and key theories around LGBTQ+ identity as historically, culturally, and politically situated. To encourage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of LGBTQ+ equality and diversity through the theory, history, ethics, and politics of queer moving images. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of queer film, video and documentary.

    (LO2) Students will demonstrate familiarity with key concepts and debates in queer theory.

    (LO3) Students will demonstrate skills in advanced moving image analysis.

    (LO4) Students will demonstrate a practical ability to facilitate a workshop discussion.

    (LO5) Students will demonstrate a practical ability to conceive of a thematic queer film season for an LGBT+ film festival with underpinning rationale and theory.

    (S1) Teamwork.

    (S2) Organisational skills.

    (S3) International awareness.

    (S4) Ethical awareness.

    (S5) Commercial awareness.

    (S6) Problem solving skills.

  • School of the Arts Work Placements Module (SOTA300)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop materials and/or undertake tasks within a practical or vocational context. To apply within that practical or vocational context professional, pedagogical, theoretical and other knowledge relevant to the development and delivery of the placement materials and/or tasks. To apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical context, and reflect and report on the relationship between the two. To develop and identify a range of personal/ employability skills, and reflect and report on this development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate an ability to develop materials and/or undertake tasks, according to a given specification and requirement, within a practical or vocational context.

    (LO2) To reflect on and evaluate the efficacy of the materials developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

    (LO3) To identify the connection between academic and/or theoretical knowledge and its practical or vocational application.

    (LO4) To identify, reflect and report on a range of personal/employability skills.

    (S1) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Report writing

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S9) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

  • Stardom and Media Celebrity (COMM303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module is designed to introduce students to the academic disciplines of star studies and celebrity studies, and to help develop students’ understanding of vocabulary, theoretical perspectives, and advanced concepts related to the areas of stardom and media celebrity. It will encourage students to differentiate between historical periods in stardom and mediated identities, and across different media platforms and contexts. It will encourage students to widen their knowledge of public figures and celebrities via conceptual, technological, economic, political and formal approaches to the topic, and to make connections between the idea of stardom/fame and other media topics and discourses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The student will demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts in and theoretical approaches to stardom and celebrity.

    (LO2) The student will critically evaluate historical shifts in celebrity cultures.

    (LO3) The student will analyse the roles played by audiences, actors, employers and different media forms in the construction of stardom.

    (LO4) The student will analyse the way in which case studies of specific examples illustrate stardom and celebrity.

    (LO5) The student will relate this analysis to wider concerns within mainstream filmmaking and media performance, across cinema, television, advertising, digital media, and alternative media forms.

    (S1) Proficient use of electronic resources and tools for research as specified and required.

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis.

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation.

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice.

    (S5) Ability to analyse theories and concepts and apply knowledge.

    (S6) Ability to construct and convey a coherent argument in written form.

  • Understanding Magazines B (COMM341)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide a critical overview of the (predominantly UK) magazine industry from its origins to the present day. To encourage students to consider contexts of production and reception in relations to magazine texts. To provide students with opportunities to evaluate existing research on magazines and produce their own analyses using similar approaches.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to discuss the conditions of magazine production in different times and contexts.

    (LO2) Students will be able confidently to discuss and reflect on the impact of digital technologies on magazine production

    (LO3) Students will critically reflect on the relationships between magazines and readers

    (LO4) Students will have demonstrated the ability to analyse various magazine texts and evaluate them in relation to key issues in the literature

    (S1) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Viral VIdeo (COMM342)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to provide students with both theoretical and practical skills and experiences which develop their understanding of communication and media roles and industries and enhance their commercial awareness, employability and enterprise skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will develop a critical awareness of viral video theory, production and practice.

    (LO2) Students will ideate original content by designing and producing viral videos.

    (LO3) Students will respond professionally and creatively to ‘client’ and tutor briefs.

    (LO4) Students will promote videos on public video-sharing and social media networks.

    (LO5) Students will demonstrate critical reflective thinking.  

    (S1) Communication skills.

    (S2) IT skills.

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Teamwork

    (S5) Reflective thinking

  • Young People and the Media (COMM343)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore the relationship between children and young people, society and the media.

    To provide a critical overview of the main debates and theories on the role of the media in children's and young people's lives.

    To investigate the media's role in key processes such as socialisation and social identity.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to evaluate the main debates on the role the media play in children's and young people's lives.

    (LO2) Students will be able to explain the relationship between children/young people, society and the media by drawing upon relevant theoretical frameworks.

    (LO3) Students will be able to analyse key processes in children's/young people's lives that the media contribute to such as socialisation and social identity.

    (LO4) Students will be able to synthesise evidence from a range of sources and present well-structured arguments.

    (S1) Intellectual skills: Critical thinking; Synthesis and analysis of data and information; Evaluation

    (S2) Transferable skills: Communication skills; Information Retrieval; Research

    (S3) Subject-specific skills: Citizenship

  • Popular Culture, Language and Politics (COMM318)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the role of popular culture in society, and politics in particular. It aims to enable students to critically consider the role of writing, speech, imagery and sound in articulating political discourses in popular culture. It will provide an advanced understanding for students who wish to either continue in postgraduate studies and/ or be used in communicative careers such as in media and public relations. It will also create opportunities and understanding for Independent Projects or Dissertations in the final term of the third year for projects which consider communication discursively.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The student will critically consider similarities and differences between the communicative properties of various modes of communication.

    (LO2) The student will apply linguistically-derived concepts to a range of popular cultural texts.

    (LO3) The student will gain advanced understanding of theoretical issues within which the study of media language is a part of.

    (LO4) The student will learn to critically analyse texts through a range of discursive approaches.

    (S1) Collate, organise and deploy ideas and information in order to formulate arguments cogently, and express them effectively in written, oral or other forms.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing.

    (S3) Engage critically with major thinkers and debates within the field, putting them to productive use.

    (S4) Make critical judgements in the understanding and evaluation of these forms.

    (S5) Appreciate and apply ethical consideration and judgement to analysis of production, distribution and consumption in communication, media, film and culture.

  • Discourse, Rhetoric and Society (COMM322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module seeks to: Give students a critical understanding of the crucial role and functions of rhetorical discourse in human society and its different contexts. Introduce students to fundamental theories and instruments of rhetorical and argumentation analysis that support the critical examination of persuasive communication in politics, business and other contexts of social interaction. Provide students with an enhanced awareness of the components of a sound argumentation and of typical techniques of manipulation and propaganda in political and business discourse.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should acquire critical understanding of the role and relevance of rhetorical discourse in different contexts of society.

    (LO2) Students should familiarize themselves with theories of rhetorical and argumentative analysis to examine discourse practices and interactions in social contexts.

    (LO3) Students should understand and explain how context create constraints and opportunities for rhetorical discourse and strategies.

    (LO4) Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate public discourse, in particular by identifying sound and fallacious rhetorical moves.

    (S1) Use of relevant theories for the critical understanding of communication processes

    (S2) Ability to recognise and distinguish different genres of rhetorical discourse

    (S3) Application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work

    (S4) Ability to analyse communicative situations (defining issues, segmenting audiences, identify constraints)

  • The Media, the Internet and Political Science (POLI319)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce students to the ways in which contemporary notions of what constitutes political science have a bearing upon what we think we know about conventional and new media. To explore the way in which conceptions of power are related to our understanding of how the old and new media function in contemporary society. To explore a range of themes that connect the new media to its conventional counter parts (including the political economy of journalism, web-based political mobilisation, citizen journalism and mediate elections). To explore particularly illuminating examples of power exertion by or through the mass media. 

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to understand what constitutes the 'canons and conventions' of contemporary Political Science, and how these relate to research on, and evidence about, the old and new media.

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate the role and importance of the various media in power structures of society.

    (LO3) Students will be aware of how the old and new media relate to each other, both nationally and internationally, and how both relate to contemporary political realities.

    (LO4) Students will have a grasp of the key themes and case studies that link media practice, to politics/politicians, and the principal power models.

    (LO5) Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

  • Aspects of Cinematic Realism (FILM302)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module will introduce students to the theoretical and practical implications of the realist aesthetic as it has been interpreted at different times and places in the history of film. Using this central concept as a base, the module aims to make students aware of the evolution of critical and theoretical approaches to film, its function and its mode of operation, from classical film criticism, through the semiotically-based analyses of the sixties and seventies, to more recent concentration on spectatorship and audience reception;

    The module aims to encourage a critical evaluation of realism as aconcept and of particular film-texts in the light of the theory underlying their production;

    The module aims to equip students with skills to engage in careful textual analysis and to assess comparatively how different stylistic choices mediate audience engagement with the reality that is notionally represented;

    At final-year level this module aims to enable students to work at a level of some theoretical sophistication and to show ability to relate complex general ideas to particular instances.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Familiarity with key concepts in film theory and ability to handle them with relation to specific texts.

    (LO2) An awareness of the critical and practical debates which have been engaged in Europe around the artistic potential and the vocational function of cinema, ability to assess the various positions critically and to formulate rigorous arguments to explain the student's own position.

    (LO3) Understanding of the various complex implications of an apparently simple concept.

    (LO4) Ability to express ideas succinctly and to carry out independent textual (visual) analysis.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S7) Information skills - Information accessing: Locating relevant information and identifying and evaluating information sources

    (S8) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

  • Sound Studies (MUSI322)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to: Develop a critical understanding of sound in society by examining the way in which the production and consumption of sound are bound up in social relations and practices.  Introduce students to key theoretical approaches and perspectives from the emerging field of sound studies. Develop critical listening skills. Adopt a comparative perspective, enabling students to reflect critically upon their own music-related practices, ideas and values.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of this module students should be able to: Demonstrate understanding of key terms, concepts and methods within the emerging field of sound studies.

    (LO2) Demonstrate developed critical aural skills.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an understanding of theoretical ideas in relation to reflections on their own experiences and observations of social life.

    (LO4) Have the ability to discuss relevant material and ideas, and to prepare well-organised and well-researched written work.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

    (S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

  • Music Policy (MUSI352)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To examine a wide range of government policies influencing the production and consumption of music.

    To situate the relationship between music and policy within local, national and international and historical contexts.

    To compare approaches to music and policy involving different types of government.

    To consider different approaches to the study of music policy and how it might be conceptualised and understood.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a deeper understanding of the impact of government policy on music and musical cultures and identities.

    (LO2) Students will gain a greater knowledge of varying approaches and attitudes to music from government bodies with contrasting political and cultural roles and relationships.

    (LO3) Students will gain a familiarisation with scholarly literature on music policy and how to apply some of the concepts and theories involved to particular case study.

    (LO4) Students will gain a critical perspectives on key concepts issues and debates related to the study of music policy and how they could be applied to particular case studies.

    (S1) Organisational skills.

    (S2) Communication skills.

  • Curation and Heritage (MUSI353)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of how popular music heritage has been defined by various agents.

    To critically examine different case studies to explore how popular music heritage has been represented, mobilized and interpreted.

    To develop an understanding of debates about cultural value.

    To develop critical awareness, interpretation skills, and essay writing skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have an understanding of how popular music heritage has been defined by various agents.

    (LO2) Have an awareness of the different ways in which constructions of heritage have been represented in different contexts.

    (LO3) Have an understanding how conceptions of heritage relate to debates about cultural value.

    (LO4) Have the ability to identify, discuss and present relevant material and ideas and to prepare well-organised and well-researched written work.

    (S1) Organisational skills.

    (S2) Communication skills.

    (S3) Analytical and critical skills.

  • The Film Music of John Williams (MUSI370)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with an account of John Williams' film music output (including stylistic development and compositional technique). To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams' film music and the narrative and dramatic content of the relevant films. To provide students with an understanding of the relationship between John Williams' film music and traditional or historical compositional techniques. To provide students with an appreciation of the contextual issues relevant to understanding John Williams' film music (e.g. Hollywood; directorial vision; populism etc).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the development of John Williams' film music output (from a stylistic perspective).

    (LO2) To demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the relationship between John Williams' film music and earlier compositional traditions and conventions.

    (LO3) To be able to relate elements of John William's compositional technique to specific film contexts or mechanics.

    (LO4) To demonstrate an awareness of broader critical and cultural issues, as relevant to situating John William's film music in context.

    (LO5) To be able to apply knowledge, understanding, and awareness (as described in the prior learning outcomes). To original case-study film examples.

    (S1) Research skills

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Comprehension

    (S4) Writing skills

    (S5) Applied skills

    (S6) IT skills

    (S7) Critical Thinking

  • Digital Cultures in the Americas (HISP348)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce students to key conceptual debates on the production and context of mainstream and non-mainstream moving and still images;   To develop students ability to apply key theoretical debates to the study of digital cultures,  platforms, and online content from across the Americas';   To encourage students to examine the use, reuse, curation and distribution by professionals and amateurs of materials online and in film;   To enhance students' skills of critical analysis and independent thinking.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Show an awareness of the key theoretical and conceptual debates on the creation and distribution of non mainstream moving and still images.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an applied knowledge of the wider historical context in which non mainstream moving and still images circulate.

    (LO3) Apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of non mainstream moving and still images.

    (LO4) Successfully apply close textual analysis of a range of material produced by non mainstream creators.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S9) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S10) Skills in using technology - Online communications skills

  • Media, Politics and Climate Change (POLI345)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Introduce students to the political and scientific realities of climate change and energy, as they are currently understood and contested; Explore journalistic practice in the realm of climate change and energy security, and the economic and political imperatives that drive it; Investigate how a range of media (and media genres, like documentaries) cover climate change and energy security, and with what impact on those exposed;   Review the social and political implications of media (under) representations of climate change, and what this tells us about contemporary democracy.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be achieve a basic understanding of the science behind climate change and energy security, alongside an appreciation of how politics impinges on climate change address/policy and the mediation of the topic

    (LO2) Students will be able to appreciate how journalists struggle to engage with the climate change and energy security issues, and do so in an increasingly pressured environment

    (LO3) Students will become aware of how the conventional and new media cover climate change and energy security; how climate scepticism impinges on the framing of stories; and how exposure to coverage influences public perceptions

    (LO4) Students will develop a grasp of what the mediation and politicisation of climate change tell us about power and democracy in contemporary society

    (LO5) Students should be able to communicate their understanding in cogent form in a varierty of non-written media

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S5) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S6) Working in groups and teams - Negotiation skills

  • Screening Antiquity (CLAH330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module introduces students to the reception of antiquity on screen.  As well as enabling students to build knowledge and understanding of key strategies and themes in the representation of ancient Greece and Rome in film, television and video games, it encourages them to develop theoretical approaches and analytical skills for evaluating their shape and significance.  Over the course of the module, students become active critics of the depiction of the ancient world in popular culture.  Through the Group Project, they have an opportunity to produce a written scene for an ancient world film of their own invention and to reflect critically on their own creative processes. For students in Ancient History, Classics and Classical Studies, this module advances perspectives and understanding developed during CLAH 200 Politics of the Past and CLAH 211 Rebuilding Troy, by exploring the representation of the ancient history and myth in contemporary contexts.  Students on the Film Studies pathway will bring their methodological know-how and subject expertise to bear on a distinctive 'genre' of film, reaching out to the related media of television and video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To develop knowledge and understanding of the range, character, and inter-relationships of representations of the ancient world on screen, i.e. in the popular audio-visual media of film, television and video games and, hence, in the Western cultural imagination

    (LO2) To appreciate how the representation of ancient Greece and Rome on screen is informed by developments in technology and responds to and impacts upon contemporary politics and society

    (LO3) To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to adaptation, translation and intertextuality (between ancient and modern material, and between genres and media)

    (LO4) To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to technical and formal properties of audio-visual media and their representational strategies

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S3) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • Italian Crime Stories: From Noir Fiction to Mafia Films (ITAL321)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce and broaden the students’ perceptions of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film; To introduce a variety of theoretical and critical approaches and considers how the different sources can relate to each other and to society; To explore and analyse a variety of sources (including novels, films and TV series); To make students aware of relevant aspects of Italian crime and Mafia fiction and film which they may wish to explore further in postgraduate research programmes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An ability to understand and discuss literary texts, films and other artefacts and to place these sources in its broader historical, cultural and social context.

    (LO2) An ability to apply theoretical approaches or critical secondary literature to the analysis of written and audio-visual sources.  

    (LO3) Ability to demonstrate confidence in written analysis and debate

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Oral skills

    (S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Independence

    (S6) Research skills - Independent analysis

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Weekly lectures and seminar discussions may be supplemented by screening sessions, presentations and opportunities for group work where appropriate. We regularly invite expert speakers and practitioners to speak to our students about their work. Some modules also make use of our specialist equipment or software.

Dissertation and work placement modules involve more independent study, but always under the careful individual supervision of a member of academic staff.


Assessment

We are committed to using a range of different forms of assessment, so types of assessment vary widely from module to module. Depending on your choice of modules, these may include coursework projects, essays, blogs, reports, literature reviews, writing exercises, presentations, online tests and unseen examinations.