Classical Studies BA (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: Q810
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33, with no score less than 4 / BTEC : Applications considered
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Module details

Programme Year One

120 credits spread evenly across two semesters

There are four compulsory modules and six optional modules.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • The Worlds of Odysseus (CLAH101)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To make students familiar with one of Homer's epics, in an analytical way;

    To stimulate students' awareness of interpretative problems in Homeric epic and of the scholarly approaches to these texts;

    To provide students with a sense of cultural and historical context of Greek literature and civilization;

    To foster core academic skills (close reading, research, written communication, academic integrity when using sources) which students will use in their subsequent study.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The students should be able to discuss Homer's Odyssey (in translation) in an informed manner

    (LO2) The students should be able to extrapolate, illustrate and contextualise cultural and socio-historical issues from the material of the Odyssey

    (LO3) The students should be able to engage with modern scholarship in order to construct interpretation of the ancient text(s) in translation

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S5) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S7) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

    (S8) Personal attributes and qualities - Integrity

    (S9) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S10) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including. referencing skills)

  • Virgil and the Age of Augustus (CLAH102)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module aims to focus on the literary output of the early Augustan period at Rome, with a focus on the Aeneid , an epic poem by Virgil and a core text for the study of Latin literature. As well as the works themselves, students explore the literary, social, and political contexts of their creation and other aspects of artistic expression at this period. This module aims to offer a foundation for further study of Latin poetry, epic poetry, and literary culture at Levels two and three.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) In the course of the this module, students will: Become familiar with Virgil's Aeneid and understand its literary shape and the contexts of its production.

    (LO2) Acquire some understanding of the concept of genre and literary structures and approaches.

    (LO3) Develop skills of reading with understanding, analysis, and argument, written communication and oral discussion, and coherent expression of their own responses to texts.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Using VIsual Culture (CLAH114)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Far from relying upon written texts alone, ancient societies typically employed a wide variety of visual media to communicate shared ideas and beliefs. The aim of this module is to acquaint you with the diverse ways in which ancient cultures (Greek, Roman, and their mediterranean conexts) could express themselves visually – encompassing everything from sculpture, painting, and architecture to the images stamped on coins; To encourage the development of the critical and methodological skills needed to ‘read’ ancient visual culture and interpret it in wider socio-cultural contexts, both ancient and modern.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to analyse examples of ancient visual culture from a range of different perspectives.

    (LO2) They will be able to critically evaluate objects and images in different contexts, ancient and modern, and to understand the continuities and differences between them.

    (LO3) Students will be able to assess the relative contribution and importance of visual culture to the wider picture of the ancient world.

    (LO4) Students will acquire specific skills necessary to talk and write about ancient visual culture, students will also develop a broader skills base, with a particular focus on different kinds of written communication (e.g. book reviews, reflective responses, essays) and library and other research skills.

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

  • Greek Myth and Society (CLAH115)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To explore ancient Greek myth in its social, political, and religious contexts, focusing primarily on the Archaic and Classical periods (7th - 4th C BC);

    To investigate the nature of myth and its role within Greek society, and to thereby develop an understanding of ancient Greek society;

    To introduce a broad range of literary, artistic, and archaeological sources for Greek myth and society, and to use them as evidence for social history;

    To assess the importance of Greek myth in later societies, including our own.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To be familiar with a number of myths circulating in ancient Greece and to appreciate their social, religious, and political dimensions.

    (LO2) To understand how literary and artistic retellings of myth shape ancient Greeks' experience of the world, their society, and relationships; and to be aware of how and why Greek myths are retold in later societies.

    (LO3) To gain knowledge of a range of literary, artistic and archaeological evidence, and use it for learning about Greek society.

    (LO4) To be able to read and evaluate modern resources and ancient sources in order to research issues and answer questions of interest to the social historian.

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

Year One Optional Modules

  • Warfare, Politics, and Society in the Greek World, 510-323 B.c. (CLAH104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to acquaint students with the history and society of the ancient Greek world from 510 BC until the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC). The module also has as its aim to enable students to engage critically with scholarship dealing with the central historical questions of that period, and to foster core skills in using and evaluating primary evidence; To enable students to learn to read and evaluate a range of advanced secondary scholarship;  To foster core skills in using and evaluating primary evidence; To develop your skills in presenting historical analysis in written and in oral form.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) You will have a sound knowledge of the broad sweep of Greek history from 510 to 323 BC, including not only the history of events but also a range of key themes in social and cultural history

    (LO2) Accustomed to using a variety of primary and secondary material to answer (and formulate) historical questions relating to political events, warfare, society and culture.

    (LO3) You will have developed a variety of transferable skills including: oral discussion; listening and note-taking skills; analytical reading of set texts; identification and deployment of material relevant to a particular question; engagement with primary evidence; written exposition; effective time-management.

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

    (S5) Information skills - Evaluation

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S7) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

  • From Hannibal to Severus: An Introduction to Roman History (CLAH105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The aim is to give the student a basic outline of Roman history; To give the student an introduction to some central social and economic themes in the Roman world; The module also serves as an introduction to academic skills required for studying the classical world and ancient history.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The objectives are that with reasonable diligence during the course of study the student will be able to: narrate and show some understanding of the main course of events in the Roman world from the Punic Wars through to c. AD 200.

    (LO2) To show some awareness of the cultural and social context of these events

    (LO3) To show some awareness of relevant source material

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S4) Using library resources effectively

    (S5) Creating bibliographies

  • Latin Ia (CLAH401)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module introduces Latin to students who have not necessarily studied a foreign language in depth before; With the help of standard terms for classifying and analysing the elements of the language's fabric, the module shows how words in Latin interact with each other ('Grammar') and how they change their shapes (cf. English, 'I eat, he eat s' ) as part of this process ('morphology'), forming phrases and building into sentences; The module builds on the step by step addition to knowledge of grammar and uses practice sentences and passages, aimed at developing the student's ability to translate Latin of increasing literary and linguistic sophistication; Students are expected to memorise Latin words and build their vocabulary. The module also aims to begin the process of learning about Roman history and culture via engagement with concepts and words in the original language.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students who take this module will be able to use traditional grammar to analyse sentences in English and Latin, and to read and translate short passages of Latin prose.

    (LO2) Transferable Skills.This module is designed to foster the following transferable skills, not all of which are directly tested in the assessment: Knowledge: recall morphological sets and grammatical rulesRecall vocabularyUnderstanding: Be able to use morphology and rules to translate sentences and passages accuratelyBe aware of un-English word order principlesBe aware of un-English pronoun usageBe aware of un-English language soundBe aware of different sociological frames for some lexical itemsBe able to use principle translation strategies (top-down bottom-up; information sequencing; need-to-know; phrase-buildingBe aware of different learning methods

    (LO3) Students who take this module will be trained in the use of:Grammatical terminology and analysis. Use and formation of nouns (5 declensions) Use and formation of verbs (4 conjugations and sum esse) Use and formation of adjectives (decelension 1/2 and 3) Transitive and intransitive sentences Apposition Use of prepositions Temporal clauses with ubi/postquam Formation and use of participles Verbs in the passive Indirect speech construction Use of volo, nolo, possum + infinitive

    (S1) grammatical skill (recall and application of morphology and syntax)

    (S2) awareness of English grammar

    (S3) translation skills; awareness of translation strategies and appropriateness of style

  • Latin Ib (CLAH402)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to continue to cover fundamental elements of Latin Grammar, phonology and morphology and their terminologies, the analysis of compound sentence structure, translation of sentences from and into Latin, and short passages from Latin;

    A continuous reading text is introduced, the anonymous latin Romance, Apollonius of Tyre. This has been adapted to produce a seamlessly increasing complexity in the expression of narrative, and an arena for the application of the knowledge and skills acquired in the language classes;

    To help students build a more extensive vocabulary of Latin words.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students who take this module will be able to use traditional grammar to analyse sentences in English and Latin, and to read and translate short passages of Latin prose.

    (LO2) Transferable Skills.This module is designed to foster the following transferable skills, not all of which are directly tested in the assessment: Knowledge: recall morphological sets and grammatical rules; recall vocabularyUnderstanding: Be able to use morphology and rules to translate sentences and passages accuratelyBe aware of un-English word order principlesBe aware of un-English pronoun usageBe aware of un-English language soundBe aware of different sociological frames for some lexical itemsBe able to use principle translation strategies (top-down bottom-up; information sequencing; need-to-know; phrase-buildingBe aware of different learning methods

    (LO3) Students who take this module will consolidate knowledge acquired in CLAH401be trained in the use of:relative clausesdemonstrative pronounscomparative and superlative adjectivescomparative and superlative adverbsablative absolutesubjunctive clauses (purpose, result, indirect command, indirect question, conditional, cum + subjunctive)

    (S1) grammatical skill (recall and application of morphology and syntax)

    (S2) awareness of English grammar

    (S3) translation skills; awareness of translation strategies and appropriateness of style

  • Ancient Greek Ia (CLAH501)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To give students the knowledge, comeptence and confidence to start reading written documents and literature from ancient Greece in their original language, working with the coursebook and unadapted ('real') texts; To introduce the shape and structure of ancient Greek words and sentences, taking students through the alphabet, articles ('the', a'), cases, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, pronouns, verb forms and uses, and the present tense in active and middle voices; To familiarize students with appropriate terminology, methods, techniques and resources for language learning; To prepare students for research with texts written in ancient Greek, and to make them better equipped for the study of ancient Greek literature, society and culture.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify basic features in the shape and structure of ancient Greek language and to develop a strong command of encountered vocabulary.

    (LO2) To understand and translate sentences and passages of ancient Greek from the coursebook and 'real' texts.

    (LO3) To use appropriate terminology, methods, techniques and resources to study ancient Greek (and other foreign languages) successfully.

    (LO4) To be familiar with some classical Greek concepts and idioms in the original language, and so gain insights into ancient Greek literature, society and culture.

    (S1) Language skills: Identifying components in a sentence and how they relate to one another, and knowing how to translate them

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Working in groups and teams: Problem solving

  • Ancient Greek Ib (CLAH502)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    Building on the work of CLAH 501, to give students the knowledge, competence and confidence to start reading written documents and literature from ancient Greece in their original language, working with the coursework and unadapted ('real') texts; To continue to introduce the shape and structure of ancient Greek words and sentences, taking students through new tenses (imperfect, future, aorist), additional noun types, comparative and superlative adjectives, further verb forms, infinitives, imperatives and case usage; To familiarize students with appropriate terminology, methods, techniques and resources for language learning; To prepare students for research with texts written in ancient Greek, and to make them better equipped for the study of ancient Greek literature, society and culture.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To identify more complex features in the shape and structure of ancient Greek language and to continue to develop a strong command of the encountered vocabulary.

    (LO2) To understand and translate sentences and passages of ancient Greek from the coursebook and 'real' texts.

    (LO3) To use appropriate terminology, methods, techniques and resources to study ancient Greek (and other foreign languages) successfully.

    (LO4) To be familiar with some classical Greek concepts and idioms in the original language, and so gain insights into ancient Greek literature, culture and society.

    (S1) Language skills: Identifying components in a sentence and how they relate to one another, and knowing how to translate them

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S4) Working in groups and teams: Problem solving

Programme Year Two

There are four compulsory modules and four optional modules.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Love and Friendship in Antiquity (CLAH201)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To introduce the students to a range of Greek and Roman sources which illustrate and provide insights into the ancient attitude(s) towards love and friendship as socio-cultural construals;

    To widen the students' knowledge and understanding of the ancient literature, society, and thought;

    To stimulate interpretive reflection on the ancient debate around love and friendship;

    To stimulate evaluation of academic writing on topics relevant to the module.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To contextualise informedly a spectrum of Greco-Roman discoursal scenarios involving love and friendship

    (LO2) To understand and discuss the socio-cultural importance of amatory and friendly relationships across the Greco-Roman civilization

    (LO3) To analyse and evaluate knowledge, structure, and stylistic quality of academic writing on topics relevant to the module

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S6) Time and project management - Personal organisation

  • Herodotus, Persia and the Greeks (CLAH207)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to Herodotus' Histories, the first major piece of historical prose to survive from antiquity;

    Through an analysis of the Histories alongside a range of other (Egyptian, Persian) evidence to explore the historical societies for which his work is central evidence. The module focuses on the Persian empire and its expansion through Asia and the Mediterranean World; Culminating in the Persian wars of 490-79 BC;

    To examine in depth a number of key themes in Herodotus' Histories: for example, his representation of foreign peoples, or of Athenian or Persian imperialism, the role of religion in the Histories, and the causes of the Persian wars.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Good knowledge of the contents of Herodotus Histories, and the intellectual, social and cultural environment from which the work arose.

    (LO2) Understanding of the issues to be addressed in using Herodotus' Histories as a historical source.

    (LO3) Knowledge of the history and institutions of the Persian Empire and of the range of non-Greek sources available for its study

    (LO4) Basic understanding of the cultural similarities and differences between the Greek world and the Ancient Near-East and the prejudices that coloured their reactions one to another

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S5) Research skills - All Information skills

  • Rebuilding Troy (CLAH211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To familiarize students with a range of source material, ancient and modern, that engages with and creates myths of Troy;

    To introduce students to methods of analysis for evaluating ‘receptions’ of Troy within and beyond antiquity;

    To examine the generic, narrative, aesthetic, and socio-political features and contexts for individual versions of the Trojan myth, with a view to understanding their historical significance;

    To understand the contingency, fluidity and malleability of Troy as imagined by cultures from antiquity to today and the various purposes new retellings of Trojan narratives serve.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To become aware of and be able to account for the diversity of Trojan narratives in different media (including epic, sculpture, figured pottery, tragedy, inscriptions, painting, film), f rom a range of periods.

    (LO2) To understand the terminology and methods of ‘reception’ studies, and analyse material from a receptions perspective.

    (LO3) To be able to identify how Trojan narratives are defined by compositional (e.g. generic, narrative, aesthetic), social and political issues.

    (LO4) To recognize the significance of Troy in the imagination of antique and post-antique cultures.

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S4) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

  • Nature and VIrtue: Ancient Ethics (CLAH299)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To familiarise the students with the core ethical concepts and terminology relevant to Greco-Roman antiquity;

    To familiarise the students with the main ideas of ancient philosophical ethics;

    To widen the students' knowledge and understanding of ancient literature and thought;

    To stimulate reflection on ethical values in historical context(s);

    To stimulate evaluation of academic writing on topics relevant to the module.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The students should be able to illustrate and discuss ethical situations found in select Greco-Roman texts

    (LO2) The students should be able to recognise and distinguish between the alternative ethical systems advanced by ancient philosophers

    (LO3) The students should be able to construct interpretation of and comparison between ethical outlooks attested for Greco-Roman antiquity

    (LO4) The students should be able to analyse and evaluate knowledge, structure and stylistic quality of academic writing on topics relevant to the module

    (S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S2) Improving own learning/performance - Record-keeping

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S5) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Communicating for audience

    (S9) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

    (S10) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Politics of the Past in the Ancient World (CLAH200)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    This module seeks to introduce a range of written and material sources through which histories of the ancient world were narrated in the Near East, Greece and Rome: for example, historiography, biography, poetry, philosophy, oratory, inscriptions and monuments. The module will explore the methods and techniques by and purposes for which histories were created by those with power and those commenting on or challenging it. It will examine the political functions of historical narratives, including the exploration of issues surrounding political power and ideology in antiquity and today. The module will allow students to  investigate the dynamics of political power in the ancient world, especially in Greece and Rome, and build understanding of political phenomena and events, eg kingship, tyranny, democracy, imperialism, civil war, and revolt, from a comparative perspective .

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To be aware of different 'historical' sources from antiquity for politics in the ancient world, and to compare their character, contents, contexts and purposes.

    (LO2) To understand the active role of history in conversations and debates about politics, from antiquity to today.

    (LO3) To build knowledge of political events, individuals involved in politics, and debates about political issues and ideologies in the ancient world, and to compare modern scholars' perspectives on them.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Working in groups and teams - Group action planning

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

  • Ovid's Metamorphoses (CLAH212)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    This module sets out to explore Ovid's Metamorphoses: one of the most influential and important works of Latin literature, it encompasses myth and history, and exemplifies Ovid's narrative and poetic modes; Students will gain a good knowledge of this poem by reading it in detail; Students will be able to set the poem in its literary and socio-historical context, and to account for its distinctive and inherited features.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a sound knowledge of the central text, the Metamorphoses, alongside a range of other literary and cultural material, including Ovid's earlier works. They will develop their ability to read and interpret an ancient literary text in detail, and to assess other interpretations of that text in later scholarship. Students will be able to place the Metamorphoses in its wider literary and cultural context, and will be encouraged to reflect upon the poem's importance for our understanding of the use of myth in antiquity and in later periods. Using the knowledge obtained through lectures, and through selecting and synthesizing information in independent study, students will develop both their written and oral communication skills, in order to construct coherent, relevant and persuasive arguments. The module also enables students to foster transferable skills (not all of which are directly tested in the assessment), e.g. : Information: access, recall, and select factual information about: author, corpus, literary, cultural, historical, and social context. Knowledge acquisition: finding own factual material

    (LO2) Analysis: be able to relate specific cases to broader contexts. Identify typical / characteristic and individual / distinctive features. Use appropriate measuring / comparative units and techniques. Assess conflicting evidence / viewpoints. Assess comparative merits of evidence-quanta. Identify with another culture and be aware of difference. Set own understanding in context of scholarly literature. Assimilate own knowledge findings with broader picture

    (LO3) Communication: convey propositions clearly in appropriate style and with fit structures. Efficient use of punctuation and grammar, topic sentences, introduction, conclusion. Use evidence with good references. Prioritize / profile arguments in terms of relative importance / productiveness

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Politics & the Architecture of Power in 5th Century Bc Athens (CLAH220)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to approach fifth-century Athenian history and archaeology by investigating contemporary or near-contemporary monuments, public spaces and literary representations in Athens of cultural and political life during a period of democratic imperialism that characterised the city between the Persian Wars and the fall of the Empire in 403 BC. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the possible relationships and issues in exploring political power, wealth, and the development of culture;

    To provide an appreciation of the built environment of Athenian fifth century political life: the role of finance in the state, the use of public writing;

    In the final third of the module you will investigate the influence of the ancient world on the development of later political systems and the infrastructure of democracies, including the construction of contemporary democratic spaces. You will also learn about the principal forms of Greek architecture and art along with their stylistic development and socio-political context;

    To improve students' critical analysis of primary sources, their writing of critical and analytical essays, and their presentation skills; and their engagement with spatial data.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will possess an improved idea of the ‘narrative’ of imperial Athens;

    (LO2) Students should be familiar with key episodes and with written and visual evidence that reflects interaction between the political environment (discrete events and political ideologies) and culture.

    (LO3) Students should be able to read and evaluate written and visual documents produced in Athens and be aware of the problems they may present as sources.

    (LO4) Students will be able to write coherent and well - argued essays, and prepare presentations, making use of documentary evidence and modern studies.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S4) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

    (S5) Information skills - Critical reading

  • Ruling the Roman Empire (CLAH261)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce to students how the Roman Empire worked;

    To introduce students to the main institutions of government, finance, and commerce;

    To introduce students to a wide range of historical sources, with the aim to develop their skills of synthesis, interpretation, and, through coursework and exams, historical argument.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the institutions of government in the Roman Empire, of differing social groups within the empire, and of the financial, agricultural and economic life of the Roman world.

    (LO2) Students will be able to show the ability to read and analyse a range of ancient primary evidence, be aware of instances were this evidence is controversial or contradictory, and be able to deploy such evidence in answer to historical questions.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate the ability to present historical argument in both oral and written form.

    (LO4) Students will be able to show an understanding of recent and appropriate theoretical approaches to the study of the Roman Empire.

    (LO5) Students will develop transferable skills (not all directly assessed) such as note-taking skills, analytical reading, synthesize and analyze historical evidence, an awareness of controversy in modern literature, lucid and detailed written argument, and time management.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

Programme Year Three

120 credits spread evenly across two semesters

There is one required module:

  • Dissertation (30 credits)

There are five optional modules (15 credits each)

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Dissertation (CLAH450)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The purpose of the dissertation is to demonstrate that the student can identify and critically explore a research-related issue or problem. Students will work independently to design and conduct a scheme of work to answer a chosen research question. Students will assemble and analyse both academic literature (references) and primary evidence (sources) to explore their chosen research question. Students will present a coherent set of data and arguments in order to analyse and interpret evidence relevant to their research question.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students will be able to use appropriate research tools and techniques.

    (LO2) By the end of the module, students will be able to present information and interpretations clearly and systematically, and produce a text written and presented to a professional standard.

    (LO3) By the end of the module, students will be able to cite sources and use appropriate academic conventions for referencing them.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

Year Three Optional Modules

  • The Seven Against Thebes: Statius, Thebaid (CLAH305)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To introduce students to post-Augustan literature and Introduction to Statius; To introduce the twelve books of the Thebaid; To examine politics in the Thebaid , violence, intertextuality in the Thebaid , Gods and heroes in the Thebaid , closure in Ancient Epic.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Successful students will be familiar with the content of the Thebaid.

    (LO2) Develop an understanding of the poem and a sense of wider literary issues surrounding Latin epic

    (LO3) Improve their ability to engage in informed private reading (applying the content of the lectures and seminars to their set text) and to express their own insights and responses both in close reading of particular passages (in the summative commentary exercise and the commentaries in the examination) and in framing an argument and discussion on a wider topic (in class discussions and in the examination essay).

    (S1) Research skills - All Information skills

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

  • Screening Antiquity (CLAH330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module introduces students to the reception of antiquity on screen.  As well as enabling students to build knowledge and understanding of key strategies and themes in the representation of ancient Greece and Rome in film, television and video games, it encourages them to develop theoretical approaches and analytical skills for evaluating their shape and significance.  Over the course of the module, students become active critics of the depiction of the ancient world in popular culture.  Through the Group Project, they have an opportunity to produce a written scene for an ancient world film of their own invention and to reflect critically on their own creative processes. For students in Ancient History, Classics and Classical Studies, this module advances perspectives and understanding developed during CLAH 200 Politics of the Past and CLAH 211 Rebuilding Troy, by exploring the representation of the ancient history and myth in contemporary contexts.  Students on the Film Studies pathway will bring their methodological know-how and subject expertise to bear on a distinctive 'genre' of film, reaching out to the related media of television and video games.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To develop knowledge and understanding of the range, character, and inter-relationships of representations of the ancient world on screen, i.e. in the popular audio-visual media of film, television and video games and, hence, in the Western cultural imagination

    (LO2) To appreciate how the representation of ancient Greece and Rome on screen is informed by developments in technology and responds to and impacts upon contemporary politics and society

    (LO3) To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to adaptation, translation and intertextuality (between ancient and modern material, and between genres and media)

    (LO4) To acquire and apply theoretical vocabulary and tools for the analysis of the reception of antiquity on screen, with attention to technical and formal properties of audio-visual media and their representational strategies

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

    (S3) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • Syria: From Alexander the Great to Constantine and His Successors (CLAH358)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to provide the student with knowledge on the history, society, and religion of Syria not only by looking at textual evidence but monuments and iconography as well.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of history, society, and religion in Hellenistic and Roman Syria

    (LO2) Understanding complexity of cultural interactions

    (LO3) Understanding role of power in shaping adaption / adoption of (distinct / foreign) culture

    (LO4) Capacity to analyse texts and iconographic material

    (S1) Communication (oral, written, visual)

    (S2) Research skills - all information skills

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

    (S4) Time and project management — Personal organisation

  • Luxuries and Consumption in Greek and Roman Antiquity (CLAH364)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Students are introduced to the ancient understandings of "luxury", the Latin origins of which word reflect a conscious preoccupation, intensified during sporadic periods of enforced social belt-tightening, with how individuals should deploy wealth;

    Students will engage with the mechanisms of collective restraint (''sumptuary laws) and explore the ways in which people in Classical antiquity responded to the idea of enforced behaviour;

    This module aims to explore Greek and Roman material culture from two parallel perspectives: how people in antiquity perceived their resources as opportunities for enjoyment and display; and how they responded to new commodities and materials;

    Successive sessions will investigate modern theoretical perspectives on consumption offer a broad methodological canvas. The resources for the module will be drawn mainly from the fourth to first centuries BC, with some comparative material from outside these limits where appropriate. The focus of individual student research will be largely thematic, but special attention will be given to the effects of broad phase changes and their socio-cultural effects (the creation of the Hellenistic kingdoms; the emergence of the Roman Empire), on given topical areas.

    Learning Outcomes

    Students will be able to demonstrate and evaluate (in quantitative and qualitative terms) a representative range of material evidence corresponding to the themes studied and discussed in seminars. ​

    Students will gain confidence and competency in the use of primary data to support original arguments.​

    Students will gain confidence and competency in the conduct of primary research, using different types of evidence, literary, historical, and material.

    Students will be able to recognize and apply motivational factors for social and economic behaviour across cultures.

    Students will be able to apply different theoretical models to interpret economic behaviour.​

    Students will be able to recognise the various ethical and moral frameworks governing individual and communal decision-making.

  • Augustus and the Foundation of Empire (CLAH301)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide an understanding of the history, politics, and culture of Augustan Rome and its empire, through rigorous study of literary, documentary, and archaeological evidence and modern bibliography.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Through lectures, tutorials, discussion, and written assessments (essay and examination), students who complete this course of study will acquire: an understanding of Augustan Rome and its empire.

    (LO2) A practical familiarity with the direct handling of evidence and the problems of interpreting such evidence.

    (LO3) An understanding of ideology and rhetoric in the visual and written sources of the Augustan age.

    (LO4) An understanding of the different perspectives from which it can be viewed.

    (S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S2) Time and project management - Personal organisation

    (S3) Research skills - All Information skills

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Your learning will flourish through lectures, seminar discussions, practical classes, oral presentations and tutorial sessions, encompassing both individual study and group work. You’ll be working with a wide range of evidence including ancient texts in translation and physical remains. Students on archaeological programmes may have the opportunity to take placements in the Garstang Museum of Archaeology or National Museums Liverpool. Single Honours and Joint Honours students can develop an individual piece of research on a topic of your own by undertaking a dissertation in the final year. An academic adviser will help you focus on and hone the topic, and meet with you regularly to discuss progress and direction.

Students will have the opportunity to develop practical skills in archaeology and/or museology. With staff currently engaged at excavations in Greece, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Zambia (to name a few), many of our students have been able to gain their experience further afield.