Chemistry with Research in Industry MChem Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


  • Course length: 4 years
  • UCAS code: F161
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : AAB / IB : 35 / BTEC : Not Accepted
chemistry-1

Module details

Programme Year One

This is identical to Year 1 of the MChem Chemistry (F102) programme. You will take modules that cover the fundamentals of Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry, plus key skills, totalling 90 credits. You will spend 3 to 6 hours per week in the laboratory and so will receive a comprehensive training in practical aspects of the subject. 

In addition, you will have a choice of 30 credits of subsidiary modules from other Departments including Environmental Sciences, Biological or Biomedical Sciences (Anatomy, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology or Physiology), Mathematics, Physics and Archaeology. There are also optional courses within Chemistry covering, eg. the Chemistry-Biology interface, and in the second semester you can opt to take a research inspired course ‘Innovative Chemistry for Energy and Materials’ delivered by staff in the Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Introductory Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to give students an understanding of the underlying principles of the chemistry of the main group elements and to give them an appreciation of the importance of this chemistry in everyday life.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module a student will have an understanding of:

    • The periodic table as an underlying framework for understanding the chemistry of the main group elements
    • The crystal structures of metals and simple ionic solids
    • Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions
    • Systematic chemistry of halides and hydrides of the main group elements
    • Systematic chemistry of halides and hydrides of the main group elements
    • The basic techniques required for the preparation and analysis of simple inorganic compounds

    A student will also have developed the following skills:

    • Planning and time-management associated with practical work
    • Report writing
  • Introductory Organic Chemistry (CHEM130)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to ensure that students are aware of fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including nomenclature, structure and bonding, and the basic principles of static and dynamic stereochemistry. The major reactions associated with the common functional groups will be covered with emphasis on reaction mechanisms. In addition, this module will provide an introduction to the basic techniques associated with practical synthetic chemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module students will know:

    • Structures and shapes of major classes of organic compounds
    • Principles of bonding in major classes of organic compounds
    • Basic principles of stereochemistry
    • Important reactions of a range of functional groups
    • An understanding of the major classes of reaction mechanisms
    • The basic techniques of synthetic chemistry (isolation, purification, identification, and design and work-up of reactions) and will have experience of characterisation using spectroscopic techniques and chemical methods.
  • Introductory Physical Chemistry (CHEM152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The main aim of this module is to equip students with an understanding of basic kinetics and thermodynamics as they relate to chemical reactions.

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of the module students should be familiar with, and be able to make appropriate use of:

    • Basic ideas of energy changes in chemical reactions
    • Ideas relating to the rates of chemical reactions
    • Basic laboratory skills and report writing, including data and error analysis
  • Introductory Spectroscopy (CHEM170)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

     

    The aim of this module is to introduce modern spectroscopic methods in chemistry. Students will understand
    • the importance of quantum mechanics in understanding atomic structure
    • the interaction of light with matter
    • atomic and molecular spectroscopy
    • information obtained from different spectroscopic techniques
    • the interpretation of spectroscopic data
    • deduction of molecular structure from spectroscopic data

    Learning Outcomes

    By the end of this module, students should have achieved the following learning outcomes:

    • An understanding of atomic structure.
    • The fundamental principles behind rotational, vibrational, electronic spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, andnuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.  
    • Application of spectroscopic techniques to elucidate moecular structure.
    • Be abble to apply this knowledge to real spectroscopic problems.
  • Key Skills for Chemists 1 (CHEM180)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is:

    (i) to equip students with the basic quantitative transferable skills required for the first year of a Chemistry degree programme. (60% of module)

    (ii) to broaden a student''s perspective of chemistry whilst developing their general transferable skills with a focus on communication and employability. (40% of module)

    Learning Outcomes

    The overarching leaning outcome is for students to have the key skills that will equip them to perform well in the rest of their chemistry degree programme.

    The learning outcomes can be divided into two areas: Quantitative and General Key Skills.

    Quantitative key skills:

    By the end of this module a successful student should be able to handle:

    • Simple volumetric calculations as required for titrations in analytical chemistry;
    • Basic algebraic manipulation and functions needed for kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics;
    • Elementary geometry required for the understanding of molecular shapes and solid state chemistry;
    • The representation of data via graphs, particularly straight line graphs, and the manipulation of data in spreadsheet programs for data analysis;
    • The basic idea of a derivative and an integral for use in physical chemistry;
    • The physical concepts of energy, momentum and angular momentum;

      ​​General key skills:

       

      By the end of this module a sucessful student will understand:

      • basic aspects of working safely in a chemistry laboratory;
      • aspects of chemical research;
      • the importance of chemistry in the development of our society;
      • chemical databases;
      • the need for academic integrity;
      • how chemistry can contribute to their transferable skills;

      In addition successful students will have developed their:

      • investigative, critical, writing and presentation skills;
      • chemical database skills;
      • employability skill.;

    Year One Optional Modules

    • Principles of Archaeology (ALGY101)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims
    • To introduce students to the various theoretical tools, field methods and laboratory techniques that archaeologists use to study and interpret the past.

    • To acquaint students with the types of data archaeologists collect, and how they analyse and interpret these data in order to reconstruct and understand past societies. ​

    • To develop the student''s intellectual skills in terms of knowledge acquisition, research, written and visual communication as well as group work and reflexive evaluation (both self and peer evaluation). ​

    • Learning OutcomesAcquire essential subject-based knowledge.

      ​Become familiar with scientific equipment, techniques and materials that are used and analysed by applied archaeological science.

      ​Become aware of the relevance of the materials, methods and arguments presented in the module for the study of the past in diverse archaeological contexts.

      ​Become familiar with the main schools of thought and intellectual debates involved in the study, and the critical analysis of specific archaeological subjects, research questions and case-studies.

      ​Become aware of appropriate standards of professional conduct, including health and safety protocols.

    • The Practice of Archaeology (ALGY102)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims
    • This module aims to introduce students to the issues involved in the design and implementation of archaeological research.

    • To introduce students to the challenges facing modern archaeologists.​

    • To introduce students to desk-based archaeological assessments​

    • To introduce students to aspects of archaeological mapping and GIS​

    • To introduce students to aspects of field recording​

    • To introduce students to aspects of archaeological data analysis​

    • To introduce students to issues involved in archaeological project and excavation design​

    • To introduce students to issues involved in the interpretation of archaeological sites and cemeteries​

    • To introduce students to principles of heritage and management of archaeological sites​

    • Learning OutcomesBy the end of the module students should be able to show some understanding of the objectives of archaeological research.

      ​By the end of the module students should be able to demonstrate an awareness of how archaeology works in both academic and commercial spheres

      ​By the end of the module students should be able to show critical awareness of the practice of archaeolgical researchand research design

      ​By the end of the module students should be able to show an understanding of how different approaches can lead to different interpretations

      ​By the end of the module students should be able to show an understanding of desk-based assessment

      By the end of the module students should be able to show an understand some basics of archaeological mapping​

      By the end of the module students should be able to show an understanding of basic archaeological data analysis​

      By the end of the module students should be able to deminstrate an understanding of aspects of archaeological field recording​ and data collection

      By the end of the module students should be able toshow an understanding of basic issues around management of archaeological sites​

      By the end of the module students should be able to show an understanding of issues of excavation strategy​

    • Foundations of Medicinal Chemistry (CHEM141)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      AimsThe aim of this module is to provide students with and understanding of :1. The key components of cells that act as the building blocks for the key macromolecular structures that are essential in medicinal chemistry.2. How macromolecules interact with each other to allow for natural cellular processes (such as gene expression) that can be exploited by medicinal chemists3. The key drug targets in medicinal chemistry
      Learning Outcomes

      ​Upon successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the chemical components of cells.

      ​Upon successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the structure, chemical bonding and interactions of a range of cellular macromolecules that allow natural cellular processes to occur

      ​​Upon successful completion of this module, a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the key drug targets in medicinal chemistry, including enzymes, receptors and nucleic acids

    • Innovative Chemistry for Energy and Materials (CHEM184)

      By the end of this module a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

      • simple chemical and electrochemical reactions
      • the relationship between fundamental materials properties and technological applications
      • the role of chemistry in complex multidisciplinary technologies
      • basic principles of battery/supercapacitor electrochemistry - such as the electric double layer
      • calculation of theoretical specific energies and energy densities
      • challenges and goals of research in energy storage/conversion devices
      • intercalation of ions into host structures
      • the basic principle of operation of a fuel cell
      • basic theory of semiconductors
      • different classes of photovoltaic devices
      • basic principles of an artificial leaf
      • the chemical technologies involved in the realisation of the "smart phone"
      • liquid crystalline state and optical anisotropy
      • the origin of electrical conductivity

      A student will be able to demonstrate the following skills:

      • self-study - via independent reading of suggested review articles
      • critical thinking - for example there are many different energy storage devices with adventagous and disadventagous propeties and scientific challenges to overcome - and the students ability to evaluate material presented to them can be assessed by short essay question in the examination
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to give students an understanding of:

      1. The underlying principles of the chemistry of electrochemical storage devices (batteries, supercapacitors) and energy conversion devices (fuel cells)

      2. The fundamentals of solar energy conversion including photovoltaics and artificial solar synthesis

      3. How chemistry impacts strongly on everyday devices - using the "smart phone" as an illustrative example to introduce concepts of modern displays (liquid crystal, organic LED), coating technology and transistors

      The course will cover a wide variety of topics in the area of innovative chemistry for energy and materials. This will act as an introduction to these areas to enable the student to pursue their interests to a deeper level independently, and to provide a foundation level knowledge in materials and electrochemistry, to be expanded in subsequent core and optional chemistry modules.

      Learning Outcomes







    • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

      • Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;
      • How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;
      • How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;
      • How the atmosphere and ocean vary together.
      • How the past state of the climate system is affected by the ocean circulation
      Learning Outcomes

      1. Knowledge and Understanding
       

      a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean.

      b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves.

      c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.​

      2. Intellectual Abilities
       

      a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate system

      b. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.​

      3. Subject Based Practical Skills
       

      a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results.

      b. Understand the use of dimensions.​

      ​​​​​​

      4. General Transferable Skills
       

      a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions.

      b. Time management.

      c. Problem solving.​

    • Introduction to Marine Biogeochemistry (ENVS158)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims
      1. To introduce students to marine chemistry of the major and trace elements.
      2. To demonstrate the dynamic relationship between the chemical ocean environment and biological processes.
      3. To identify the main ocean basins and main oceanic transport routes of chemical species
      4. To teach the necessary practical skills for oceanographic sampling and measurement of chemical species.
      Learning Outcomes1. Students will be able to identify ocean basins, their major characteristics and transport pathways.

      2. Students will gain knowledge of the sources and distributions of major and minor elements in the ocean, including dissolved gases, nutrients and carbon.​

      3. Students will understand the chemical and biological processes that control the distribution of major and minor elements including dissolved gases, nutrients and carbon.​

      ​3. Students will recognize the form and function of different components of the marine ecosystem including viruses, bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton. ​

      ​4. Students will be able to synthesis knowledge of key biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus to understand how they are linked in the modern and past ocean environment. 

      5. Students will know how to measure key properties of the ocean and interpret why they vary in space and time

    • Introduction to Physiology and Pharmacology (LIFE106)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      This module aims to:

      1. Provide students with a grounding in the concepts and principles that underlie human systems biology;
      2. Introduce the concepts of interactions of drugs and other exogenous chemicals on biological processes;
      3. Develop concepts of drug absorption and the relationship between chemical structure and drug action;
      4. Develop knowledge and understanding in physiology and pharmacology, and ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve problems in these disciplines.
      Learning Outcomes

      On successful completion of this module, the students will be able to:

      1.  Describe homeostasis and its maintenance;
      2.  Define osmosis and hydrostatic pressure;
      3.  Outline the fundamentals of membrane potentials and how they are influenced;
      4.  Explain the roles played in various body systems in organism maintenance;
      5.  Distinguish how body systems interact in response to external stressors;
      6.  Define the way in which pharmacology is studied and drugs are developed;
      7.  Describe the properties of receptors;
      8.  Identify the chemical interactions between drugs and receptors;
      9.  Define and use the terms absorption, distribution and metabolism of drugs.
    • Newtonian Dynamics (PHYS101)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
      • To introduce the fundamental concepts and principles of classical mechanics at an elementary level.
      • To provide an introduction to the study of fluids.
      • To introduce the use of elementary vector algebra in the context of mechanics.
      Learning Outcomes

      Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the laws of classical mechanics, and understand physical quantities with magnitudes, directions (where applicable), units and uncertainties.

      • understand physical quantities with magnitudes, directions (where applicable), units and uncertainties.
      • apply the laws of mechanics to statics, linear motion, motion in a plane, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion and gravitation.

      Apply the laws of mechanics to unseen situations and solve problems.

      Develop a knowledge and understanding of the analysis of linear and rotational motion.

      ​Develop a knowledge and understanding of the analysis of orbits, gravity, simple harmonic motion and fluid flow.

    • Foundations of Modern Physics (PHYS104)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims
      • To introduce the theory of special relativity and its experimental proofs.
      • To carry out calculations using relativity and visualise them.
      • To introduce the concepts and the experimental foundations of quantum theory.
      • To carry out simple calculations related to quantum mechanical problem tasks.
      • To show the impact of relativity and quantum theory on contemporary science and society.
      Learning Outcomes

      An understanding why classical mechanics must have failed to describe the properties of light, the motion of objects with speeds close to the speed of light and the properties of microspopic systems.

      ​A basic knowledge on the experimental and theoretical concepts which founded modern physics, i.e. that either relativity or quantum theory or both are needed to explain certain phenomena.​

      ​A knowledge of the postulates of special relativity.​

      ​An understanding of the concept of spacetime, of the relativity of length, time and velocity.​

      An ability to apply the Lorentz transformation and the concept of Lorentz invariance to simple cases​

      ​An ability to apply the equations of relativistic energy, momentum and rest mass.​

      ​An understanding of the Doppler effect for light and visualisation of relativistic effects.​

      ​An ability to solve problems based on special relativity.​

      ​An understanding why quantum theory is the conceptual framework to understand the microscopic properties of the universe.​

      ​An understanding of the quantum theory of light and the ability to apply the energy-momentum conservation for light, e.g. photo-electric effect, Compton effect.​

      ​An understanding of the structure of atoms and its experimental foundations.

      ​An understanding of Bohr''s theory of the atom and its application to the H-atom including the concept of principal quantum numbers.​

      ​An understanding of de Broglie waves and their statistical interpretation.​

      ​An ability to explain the experimental evidence of de Broglie waves with scattering experiments of electrons, X-rays and neutrons.​

      ​An understanding of the principles of quantum mechanical measurements and Heisenberg''s uncertainty principle.​

      ​An understanding of the identity principle of microscopic particles and the basic idea of quantum (Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein) statistics.​

      ​A basic knowledge of contemporary applications of quantum theory and relativity, e.g. nuclear reactor and nuclear fissions, and the impact on our society.​

    Programme Year Two

    This is again identical in structure to the MChem Chemistry (F102) programme, with more advanced modules in theoretical and laboratory Chemistry and 30 credits of optional modules chosen from either Chemistry or another Department.

    During this year, students will be seeking their industrial placements and so you will also receive help in writing an attractive CV to showcase your skills and in interview technique, with mock interviews being provided

    Year Two Compulsory Modules

    • Metals and Metalloids of the P and D-blocks (CHEM214)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      Aims:

      This module is an introduction to the co-ordination and organometallic chemistry of 3d transition metals, and will encompass theory, physical methods and descriptive chemistry.

      The aims of the module are:

      • To outline how bonding theories (valence bond, crystal field, ligand field) have been developed by chemists to rationalise important properties of the d–block elements, many of which distinguish them from organic and main group compounds
      • To illustrate the chemistry of the transition elements by a detailed study of three groups, Ti/Zr/Hf, Fe/Ru/Os and Ni/Pd/Pt, including:
        • Discovery, isolation and technological importance of the elements and their compounds
        • A survey of the chemistry of the different oxidation states and a comparison of the 3d elements with their heavier 4d and 5d relatives
        • Brief comparisons/contrasts with neighbouring groups of elements.
      • To introduce the theory underlying the use of appropriate physical and spectroscopic techniques for characterising d–block complexes, and examples of their application.
      • To introduce the chemistry, and some applications, of complexes in low oxidation states, including:
        • CO as an examplar of a p-acceptor ligand
        • 3d Metal carbonyl complexes
        • Analogous ligands, e.g. NO, RNC
        • The 18-electron rule; what it is, and why it applies to these complexes.
      • To introduce the chemistry, and some applications, of p-block elements and compounds.         

       

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module students should:

      • Show an understanding of the concepts, applications and limitations of the different bonding theories relevant to transition-metal complex chemistry, and be aware of their relative relevance in different chemical contexts.
      • Be able to identify key elements of the structures of transition-metal complexes, and apply their knowledge of spectroscopic and physical techniques to work out the correct structure for a complex, given relevant chemical and spectroscopic information.
      • Be able to describe the social, economic and technological importance of selected transition elements.
      • Understand and be able to describe the significance of the syntheses, characterisation and chemistry of 3d metal complexes encountered in the practical module, CHEM245.
      • Understand the origin of the18-electron rule, its application and the sort of complexes to which it applies.
    • Organic Chemistry II (CHEM231)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions within a mechanistic and synthetic framework, together with exposure to a selection of stereochemical issues.

      Learning Outcomes

      Students should be able to solve problems featuring:

      Scope and mechanisms of basic reactions (nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions, addition and elimination reactions)

      Basic carbonyl chemistry (alkylation, acylation, aldol, conjugate additions).

      Structure, reactivity and synthesis of simple heterocycles (including pyridines, pyrroles, furans)

      Functional group interconversions and stereochemistry.

    • Preparative Chemistry: Synthesis and Characterisation (CHEM245)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The module aims to present a unified approach to the synthesis and characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will build on techniques introduced in the first year laboratory courses.

      Learning OutcomesStudents will complete a number of different experiments and synthetic techniques across synthetic, organic and inorganic chemistry.

      ​Students will appreciate how spectroscopic techniques can be used in the characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will be able to use analytical and spectroscopic methods to characterise their synthesised compounds.

      ​Students will make use of scientific databases during some assignments and an electronic report.

      ​Students will assess the risks inolved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner.

      ​Students should be able to organise and plan their time effectively

      ​Students will experience working collaboratively with others in multiple learning environments

    • Measurements in Chemistry (CHEM246)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to instruct students in the practice of taking physical measurements, the critical analysis and evaluation of experimental data, the application of measurements to the study of chemical phenomena and the dissemination of results.

      Learning Outcomes
      By the end of the module, students should be able to
      1.      take physical measurements of varying complexity using a wide range of experimental techniques;
      2.      assess the risks involved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner;
      3.      choose appropriate methods for the analysis of data;
      4.      analyse experimental data using graphs, spreadsheets and linear regression;
      5.      assess the accuracy and significance of experimental results;
      6.      apply the results of physical measurement to the interpretation of chemical phenomena;
      7.      combine units and perform a dimensional analysis;
      8.      have experience of the application of spectroscopic techniques (UV, IR, NMR and mass spectrometry) in the characterization of organometallic and inorganic compounds;
      9.      organise and plan their time effectively.
    • Physical Chemistry II (CHEM260)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims
    • ​To explain the application of the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics to chemical reactions.

    • ​To reinforce the basic ideas on factors affecting the rates of chemical reactions and quantify the kinetics.

    • To provide an introduction into basic concepts of quantum mechanics.​

    • ​To advance knowledge of quantitative analysis of molecular spectra.​
    • ​To make students familiar with the basic ideas of photochemistry.​

    • Learning Outcomes​Discuss the difference between ideal and real gases.

      ​Discuss the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics in the context of chemical reactions.​

      Carry out thermochemical calculations involving enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy.​
      ​Calculate equilibrium constants from thermodynamic data.

      ​Discuss the concept of the chemical potential and its application under ideal and non-ideal conditions.​
      ​Analyse experimental data for the determination of  reaction orders and rate coefficients, using appropriate methods depending on the type of data available.
      ​Derive and apply rate equations and integrated rate equations for 0th, 1st and 2nd order reactions. ​
      ​Show an understanding of activation barriers and apply the Arrhenius equation.​
      ​Describe qualitatively and quantitatively the kinetics of simple parallel, consecutive, and equilibration reactions. 
      ​Apply the pre-equilibrium and steady state approximations.​
      ​Describe different decay processes of photoexcited states and analyse them quantitatively.​
      ​Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics, including operators and wavefunctions.​
      ​Show an understanding of molecular energy levels and the forms of spectroscopy which involve transitions between them.​

      Compute basic properties of diatomics, eg bond lengths, from molecular spectra.​

      ​Use mathematical procedures and graphs for quantitative data analysis and problem solving.​

      ​Present and discuss the solution to problems in a small-group environment.​

    • Key Skills for Chemists 2 (CHEM280)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
      Aims
      1. To further develop the quantitative skills of a student, through more advanced skills in the application of mathematics, physics and information technology applicable to the second year of an undergraduate degree in chemistry. (50% of module)

      2. To introduce students to the use of Molecular Modelling in Chemistry *(35% of modules

      3. To further develop a student''s  general transferable skills in oral and written communication, presentation and team working. (15% of module). ​
      Learning Outcomes

      The overarching learning outcome is that students will gain the necessary key skills to perform well in their chemistry degree programmes.

      Quantitative key skills:By the end of the module a successful student will have improved their ability to:
      • perform basic calculus (integral and differential) as applied to kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics
      • use partial differentiation in general problems and to categorise stationary points in functions of more than one variable
      • apply algebraic manipulation in kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics
      • apply the algebra of complex numbers in quantum mechanics problems
      • use basic matrix vector algebra
      • solve simple eigenvalue problems and compute determinants of small matrices
      Molecular Modeling skills By the end of this module, a successful student will have gained:
      • a qualitative understanding of ab initio, semi-empirical and empirical models, knowing which model is suitable for a particular type of problem.
      • the ability to to predict the ground state energy and structure of isolated molecules (not too complicated) and estimate equilibrium constants (ΔH = ΔE) for simple reactions
      • the ability to rationalise some aspects of reactivity (charge density, frontier orbitals).
      • some experience of modelling intermolecular forces and complexes.

      General key skills:

      By the end of this module, a successful student will have improved:
      • knowledge of methods of presenting chemical research.
      • presentation skills
    • Inorganic Applications of Group Theory (CHEM316)
      Level3
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      This module aims to demonstrate the underlying importance of symmetry throughout Chemistry, with particular applications to spectroscopic selection rules and bonding.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module, students should be able to:

      • Identify symmetry elements in molecules
      • Assign molecules to their correct point groups
      • Use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding

    Year Two Optional Modules

    • An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (CHEM248)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental principles that underpin modern medicinal chemistry, including an introduction to targets for drug action, methods of administration, qualitative and quantitative SAR, computer aided molecular design, solid phase chemistry /combinatorial chemistry.   The course also aims to describe in detail the chemical mechanisms of antitumour agents and will also include two lectures on carbohydrate chemistry.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of this module students are expected to have acquired an understanding of

      • The principle bonding interactions in drug receptor interactions
      • The basic concepts of structure activity relationships (SAR) and quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR)
      • The principles behind computer aided molecular design and 3-D QSAR
      • Peptide synthesis, protecting groups and combinatorial chemistry
      • Chemical mechanisms of drugs that target DNA
      • Basic carbohydrate chemistry

      and will be able to use these concepts and principles to solve simple problems in medicinal chemistry.

    • Science Communication (CHEM390)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The aims of this module are to:

      • Provide key transferable skills to undergraduates, including: communication, presentation, practical classroom skills and team-working
      • Provide classroom based experience for undergraduates who are considering teaching as a potential career
      • Encourage a new generation of STEM teachers
      • Provide role models for pupils within schools located in areas of high deprivation
      • Increase University of Liverpool widening participation activities within Merseyside
      Learning Outcomes

      On successful completion of this module students will:

      • have an understanding of the UK educational system and relevant teaching and learning styles
      • have an understanding of the widening participation agenda
      • be able to apply the relevant protocols and safeguarding practice when delivering within a school setting
      • be able to apply practical knowledge of effective delivery styles when engaging with primary or secondary aged pupils
      • reflect on and evaluate the effectiveness of the delivery
      • have experience of planning and delivery of a project
      • have experience of team working
      • have experience of science communication in a variety of situations
    • An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (CHEM248)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental principles that underpin modern medicinal chemistry, including an introduction to targets for drug action, methods of administration, qualitative and quantitative SAR, computer aided molecular design, solid phase chemistry /combinatorial chemistry.   The course also aims to describe in detail the chemical mechanisms of antitumour agents and will also include two lectures on carbohydrate chemistry.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of this module students are expected to have acquired an understanding of

      • The principle bonding interactions in drug receptor interactions
      • The basic concepts of structure activity relationships (SAR) and quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR)
      • The principles behind computer aided molecular design and 3-D QSAR
      • Peptide synthesis, protecting groups and combinatorial chemistry
      • Chemical mechanisms of drugs that target DNA
      • Basic carbohydrate chemistry

      and will be able to use these concepts and principles to solve simple problems in medicinal chemistry.

    • Functional Organic Materials (CHEM241)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      ​The aims of this module are to:

      • Provide students with an understanding of how synthetic polymers and synthesised and characterised.
      • Enable students understand the relationship between the structure and properties of organic materials.
      • Develop knowledge on some important characterisation techniques used for organic materials.
      • Give the students an insight into some of the organic materials research ongoing at the University of Liverpool.


      Learning Outcomes

      ​Students should be able to; name common monomers and polymers, describe different synthetic routes to produce polymers and discuss basic characterisation of synthetic polymers.

      ​Students will able to understand how to characterise organic crystalline and porous materials.

      ​Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of how functional organic materials are synthesised, and show an understanding of the relationship between the structure and properties of a material.

      ​Students will be able to outline how to design materials for specific applications.

    • Introduction to Statistics (MATH162)
      Level1
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      To introduce topics in Statistics and to describe and discuss basic statistical methods.

      To describe the scope of  the application of these methods.

      Learning Outcomes

        to describe statistical data;


      ​ to use the Binomial, Poisson, Exponential and Normal distributions;

      ​to perform simple goodness-of-fit tests

      ​to use the package Minitab to present data, and to make statistical analysis

    • Principles of Pharmacology (LIFE207)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims
    • This module aims to: Develop an understanding of the quantitative aspects of drug action on cellular receptors;

    • Demonstrate the relationship between drug efficacy and chemical structure;

    • Introduce the basic principles of pharmacokinetics, outline the relationship between drug concentration and response, and include an introduction to the principles of toxicity of drugs and their metabolites;

    • Provide knowledge of the molecular biology of receptors;

    • Develop knowledge and understanding in pharmacology, and the ability to apply, evaluate and interpret this knowledge to solve pharmacological problems.

    • Learning OutcomesOn successful completion of this module, the students should be able to: Describe quantitative aspects of drug action;​Define the relationship between drug efficacy and chemical structure;​State key pharmacokinetic concepts such as clearance, volume of distribution, half life and steady state and to solve problems involving these parameters;​Demonstrate the role of drug concentrations in determining response to treatment;​Describe early biochemical events after drug administration that are of toxicological and biochemical significance;​Describe the principles of selective toxicity and their application to both self and non-self targets;​Demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the principles of pharmacology, and how this knowledge has been applied to solve problems.​
    • Nanoscale Processes in Biology (CHEM226)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      ​The aim of this module is to provide students with basic knowledge in cell biology, in particular, aspects of relevance to Nanotechnology. Students will be able to discuss the key nanoscale processes of life, i.e. light and dark reactions in photosynthesis, the respiratory chain, the ATP synthase reaction, the sodium/potassium pump, kinesin and microtubles, membrane transport, action potential, synaptic signalling, protein sorting and g-protein signalling.


      Learning Outcomes

      ​ability to assess the role of molecular structure and nanoscale organisation for the function of biological membranes and membrane bound processes in different scenarios, i.e. signal transduction in nerve cells, respiratory processes in mitochondria, photosynthesis in chloroplasts and cell communication.

      ​ability to discuss the importance of nanoscale organisation of sub-cellular structures.

      ​ability to relate molecular scale conformation changes to nanoscale organisation and micro- and macroscopic motion caused by molecular motors in biological systems. 

      ability to predict membrane potentials from the application of the Nernst Donnan Equation

      ability to relate basic electrical and electrochemical processes to complex physiological phenomena.​

    Programme Year Three

    Your third year will be spent on a paid industrial placement. Since you will be returning from placement into the fourth year of the MChem programme, you also need to cover the core Chemistry of the regular Year 3.  This is done in specially developed distance learning modules supported by recorded lectures and special tutorial assignments. You will be required to write a final report on your research and performance during the year in industry,  and this will contribute part of your mark for the year.

    Year Three Compulsory Modules

    • Advanced Chemistry (distance Learning) (CHEM340)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
      Aims

      The overall aim of this module is to consolidate and extend second year knowledge of Organic, Inorganic and Physical chemistry.

      Organic: Year 2 synthetic chemistry is extended to cover pericylic reactions, rearrangements and fragmentations, radical reactions and synthesis of alkenes. Basic concepts and techniques of physical organic chemistry are explained concurrently, including free energy diagrams and kinetic analysis of common mechanisms.

      Inorganic: Year 2 inorganic chemistry is extended to explain the mechanisms by which transition metal complexes exchange ligands, how they participate in redox reactions, and the chemistry of metal-alkyl, metal-alkene, metal-aryl, metal-alkyne and metal-carbene bonds. In the second strand of the course the structures of solid state materials are introduced including the use of diffraction data, how electrons behave in extended structures, the distinction between metals and insulators, and the behaviour of doped semiconductors.

      Physical: To demonstrate the relationship between microscopic and macroscopicmodels for physical chemical phenomena and the physical chemistry ofelectrochemical cells, surfactants and colloids.

      Learning Outcomes 

      Organic learning outcomes:  

      • Demonstrate a good understanding of the core synthetic reactions covered and their mechanisms.
      • Be able to deduce mechanisms on the basis of kinetic and other evidence.
      Inorganic learning outcomes:
      • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of ligand field and other factors in determining how metal complexes undergo ligand exchange, and how they undergo electron transfer.
      • Appreciate the bonding of different organic fragments to transition metals and how a variety of physical measurements can be used to substantiate these ideas.
      • Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of infinite solids and their diffraction of X-rays
      • Appreciate the factors affecting the electronic properties of solids.
      Physical learning outcomes:
      • Understand how macroscopic physical properties of a system are related to microscopic properties of molecules.
      • Understand how to derive thermodynamic variables from the energy levels available to a set of particles (molecules, electrons, photons).
      • Have an understanding of the physical chemistry of ideal and real electrochemical cells.
      • Have an understanding of the physical chemistry of surfactants and colloids;
      • Be able to apply their knowledge of physical chemistry to solve unseen problems.
       
    • Year in Industry (mchem) (CHEM360)
      Level3
      Credit level90
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      ​The aims of this module is to provide students with experience of working in an industrial environment to gain new laboratory and soft skills

      Learning Outcomes

      ​The students will improve their general transferable skills including

      -effective communication

      -time management

      -ability to self-learn

      -taking responsibility

      -team-working etc.​

      The students will learn new practical skills as appropriate to the placement

    Programme Year Four

    On returning from industry, you enter the fourth year of the MChem Chemistry programme. This final year of your programme will be dominated by your Chemical Research Project which accounts for 60 of the 120 credits. You will choose which branch of Chemistry you wish to pursue research in (and usually also which research group you wish to be in), and work throughout the year on original research at the frontiers of Chemistry.

    As for MChem Chemistry (F102) you will choose four of the six core Chemistry modules that best reflect your interests and the second semester theoretical modules are all optional courses based on research themes in the Department.

    Year Four Compulsory Modules

    • Chemical Research Project (CHEM480)
      LevelM
      Credit level60
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to develop the skills necessary to undertake independent research.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of this module students will have:

      • Acquired advanced laboratory skills.
      • Developed an ability to work independently and be self-critical in the evaluation of risks, experimental procedures and outcomes.
      • Extended their written and oral communication skills.
      • Extended their information-technology skills.
      • Acquired time-management and organisational skills.
      • Acquired competence in the planning, design and execution of experiments.
      • Acquired the ability to use an understanding of the limits of accuracy of experimental data to inform the planning of future work.

      Students will

      • Be able to predict the ground state energy, structure  and properties of isolated molecules (for relatively simple systems).
      • Be able to estimate equilibrium constants, rate constants and calculate transition states (for simple reactions).
      • Be able to rationalise aspects of reactivity (charge density, frontier orbitals).
      • Have some understanding of intermolecular forces and complexes (pharmacological example)
      • Be able to judiciously apply molecular modelling to their research projects
    • Advanced Spectroscopy (c Option) (CHEM451)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      This is an advanced module that aims to introduce the student to modern spectroscopic techniques and their applications in materials characterisation. Emphasis is given to those techniques, which are currently most important to chemical research both in industry and academia. The students should be able to understand the basic physical principles of these techniques and to decide which combination of techniques is best employed to tackle a particular problem of materials characterisation.  

      The module will deal in-depth with

      - vibrational spectroscopies (infrared reflection absorption, attenuated total internal reflection and surface enhanced Raman) and their application to the study of molecules at surfaces relevant to materials characterisation, heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience;

      - electronic spectroscopies (X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger, energy dispersive Xray spectroscopy) and their application to determine the chemical composition of interfaces.

      The module will also cover a range of other analytical chemistry tools suitable for interface and materials characterisation.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module, successful students should have gained an in-depth understanding of a range of advanced spectroscopies and be able to explain the physical principles of these spectroscopies, analyse spectra and be able to discuss their suitability to address certain problems of materials characterisation. In particular, successful students should be able to:

      -         Explain surface vibrational spectroscopy (infrared absorption and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy), interpret spectra and apply selection rules to determine the orientation of molecules at surfaces.

      -         Explain electronic spectroscopies (photoelectron, Auger, energy dispersive Xray spectroscopy), interpret spectra and deduce surface chemical composition based on quantitative and qualitative analysis

      -         Critically compare different methods of spectroscopy and their suitability to tackle a particular problem in materials characterisation

      -          Critically evaluate the use of spectroscopy to support scientific conclusions based on literature

    • Application of Enzymes in Organic Synthesis €� Industrial Biotechnology (CHEM486)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      AimsThe aim of this module is to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the application of enzymes and how to apply them in organic synthesis​.  Students will gain insight into modern methods of mutagenesis for enzyme optimisation and also cutting edge approaches to designing artifical enzymes and assemblage of cascade pathways for synthesis.
      Learning Outcomes

      Bythe end of the module, students should be able to:

       

       •   Understand how enzymes can be applied in organicsynthesis.

       •   Demonstrate a knowledge of how genes encode enzyme 3Dstructure

       •   Understand factors governing the selection ofbiocatalyst and biocatalyst type.

       •   Show an understanding of cofactor requirements andrecycling strategies in redox biotransformations.

       •   Show a knowledge of the advantages and limitations inthe application of biocatalysts.

                 •      Demonstrate a knowledge of enzyme immobilizationmethods.

                 •   Show an understanding of the use molecular biology formutagenesis 

          and directed evolution methods to improve enzyme activity or 

                    selectivity.

                 •   Have an appreciation of new approaches for creatingartificial    enzymes.


       •​  Understand how enzymereactions can be assembled into multistep cascade synthetic pathways.

    Year Four Optional Modules

    • Lanthanide and Actinide Chemistry (CHEM411)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      ​The aim of the module is to give students an overview of the most important aspects of the unique chemistry and spectroscopy of the lanthanide and actinide elements, illustrated with contemporary examples of the applications of their compounds in chemistry and technology.

      Learning Outcomes

      Students will understand the underlying principles of lanthanide and actinide chemistry, and how these differ from those of d-transition metal chemistry

      Students will have an understanding of the most important aspects of spectroscopy of compounds of the lanthanide

      Students will have an appreciation of how recent research is developing applications for the elements and their compounds

      Students will have appreciation of the strategic importance of the elements e.g. in nuclear power and sustainable energy applications

      ​Students will be able to read and critically evaluate research papers from the recent literature

    • Protein Structure and Dynamics (CHEM452)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to discuss the application of basic physical chemistry concepts for describing protein structure and dynamics and to show how advanced physical chemistry methods are used for investigating these important aspects of proteins.

      Learning Outcomes

      Ability to discuss the importance of protein structure and dynamics for understanding biological processes.

      Ability to describe the experimental methods that are used to study structure, folding and fast dynamics of proteins.

      Ability to discuss the physical chemistry principles underlying these methods and apply the basic equations needed for the analysis of such data.​

      Ability to describe and discuss some of the theoretical methods that are used to predict protein structure and and model protein folding/dynamics.​

      Ability to analyse PDB-structure files and create meaningful graphical representations from these files.​

    • Modelling of Functional Materials and Interfaces (CHEM454)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
      Aims
    • ​To provide students with an introduction to modern computational chemistry methods and concepts for functionalmaterials and interfaces. These methods will include primarilydensity functional theory methods for electronic structure but alsoan orientation towards wave function methods and classical moleculardynamics methods combined with force fields. 

    • ​To understand how computational modelling can be used in research and development of functional materials and interfaces

    • ​To be able to assess results from such computational modelling

    • ​To prepare students tocarry out competitive postgraduate research in Computational and Theoretical Chemistry, Materlals Chemistry, and Functional Interfaces

    • Learning Outcomes

      P{margin-bottom:0.21cm;}P.western{;} To describe the role and merits of wave function versus density methods

      ​To describe some basic concepts of density functional theory such as: exchange-correlation functionals including some of their shortcomings and Kohn-Sham states

      ​To gain a basic understanding of the behaviour of electrons in periodic structures: solids and interfacesP{margin-bottom:0.21cm;}P.western{;}

      ​To be able to apply tight binding/Huckel to some simple situations

      To describe what can be learnt from computation of total energies and forces​

      To describe origin of interatomic and molecular forces and relate them to electronic structure

      ​To gain an understanding of force fields and their applicability

      To describe the basics of classical molecular dynamics and thermostats​

    • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (CHEM474)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      This is an advanced module that aims to introduce the student tomodern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques and theirapplications in analytical chemistry. The students will be able tounderstand the basic physical principles of NMR and to decide howto use it to tackle a particular problem of molecules and materialscharacterisation.  

      In particular, the module will deal with- the principles ofnuclear magnetic resonance, including modern methods for the determination ofchemical structure and intermolecular interactions in complex organicmolecules, polymers and solids as well as the concept of electron paramagneticresonance spectroscopy;

      Learning Outcomes​​By the end of the module, successful students should have gainedan in-depth understanding of NMR (and EPR) and be able to explain the physicalprinciples of these spectroscopies, analyse spectra and be able to discusstheir suitability to address certain problems of materials characterisation. Inparticular, successful students should be able to:

      - Discuss the behaviour of nuclear spins and theirensembles in an external magnetic field and the influence of magneticinteraction on the appearance of NMR spectra;

      - Describe the structure of modern NMR spectrometers,explain the concepts of data acquisition and processing and show anunderstanding of chemical shift, magnetisation, rotating frame of reference,scalar coupling and basic pulse programming;

      - Explain the origins of relaxation, the principles of the determinationof T1 and T2 relaxation times, their calculation from NMRdata, and the relationship between relaxation and molecular motion.

      - Explain the nuclear Overhauser effect and its use inanalysis of complex organic molecules;

      - Describe the main principles of one- and two dimensionalexperiments and interpret the spectra recorded for both liquids and solids;

      - Explain the differences in acquisition of solution andsolid-state NMR spectra and specific methods used for solids (magic anglespinning, cross-polarisation and decoupling);

      - Describe experiments suitable for the analysis ofinternuclear connectivites, distances and mobility in organic and inorganicsolids;

      - Understand the concept of electron paramagnetic resonance(EPR) spectroscopy;

      - Critically compare different methods of spectroscopy andtheir suitability to tackle a particular problem in materials characterization;

      - Critically evaluate the use of spectroscopy to support scientificconclusions based on literature.​
    • Organic Electronics (CHEM492)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      The aims of the module are:

      1. To show students how semiconducting organic molecules and materials can be designed and synthesised for use in a wide range of electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes, thin film transistors, photovoltaic devices and sensors.

      2. To introduce the students to current topics of interest in the field of molecular electronics, the science of incorporating single molecules into electrical circuits.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module, students should:

      Be familiar with important structure-property relationships in pi-conjugated materials, and how these relate to their uses as organic semiconductors in different electronic devices.

      Be aware of synthetic routes to the materials, and how these can limit or control their properties.

      Be familiar with important parameters used to assess the performance of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs, OTFTs and OPVDs.

      Be aware of current and possible future industrial applications of this new technology.

      Be aware of concepts underlying experiments to determine the electrical properties of single molecules, and of the significance of these measurements.

      Be able to read and understand review papers from the literature in these areas.

    • Chemical Nanotechnology (CHEM494)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      The aims of this module are:

      • To introduce the student to some current problems and challenges of materials chemistry.
      • To provide the student with knowledge of important experimental methods in nanostructure research.
      • To create an appreciation for applied aspects of research in this area.
      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module, students should:

      • Understand the concept of Self-assembly.
      • Have an overview of chemical and materials aspects of nanotechnology.
      • Be acquainted with metal, semiconductor and carbonaceous nanostructures.
      • Know the basics of TEM, STM and AFM
      • Be able to comment critically on prospective applications of nanostructured materials.
    • Asymmetric Catalysis for Organic and Pharmaceutical (CHEM496)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      To introduce students to the main aspects of asymmetric catalysis and its application in synthetic organic chemistry.

      Learning Outcomes
      • An understanding of the importance of asymmetric catalysis.
      • An understanding of the fundamental principles and mechanisms of asymmetric catalysis.
      • An understanding of the applications of asymmetric catalysis in fine chemicals and pharmaceutical synthesis.  
      • An opportunity to consider new developments in the field, especially those that underpin new environmentally benign processes.
    • Measurements in Chemistry (CHEM246)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to instruct students in the practice of taking physical measurements, the critical analysis and evaluation of experimental data, the application of measurements to the study of chemical phenomena and the dissemination of results.

      Learning Outcomes
      By the end of the module, students should be able to
      1.      take physical measurements of varying complexity using a wide range of experimental techniques;
      2.      assess the risks involved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner;
      3.      choose appropriate methods for the analysis of data;
      4.      analyse experimental data using graphs, spreadsheets and linear regression;
      5.      assess the accuracy and significance of experimental results;
      6.      apply the results of physical measurement to the interpretation of chemical phenomena;
      7.      combine units and perform a dimensional analysis;
      8.      have experience of the application of spectroscopic techniques (UV, IR, NMR and mass spectrometry) in the characterization of organometallic and inorganic compounds;
      9.      organise and plan their time effectively.
    • Solid State Chemistry and Energy Storage Materials (CHEM442)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      ​Theaims of the module are:

      • To provide an introduction todiffraction methods for the characterisation of solid state materials.
      • To introduce the students tothe concepts and applications of symmetry in the solid state.
      • To provide an introduction tothe structures of solid state materials and their description and phasetransitions.
      • To provide a perspective onthe ranges of properties displayed by solids, particularly cooperativemagnetism, ferroelectricity, and multiferroicity and their relationships tostructure and symmetry.
      • To introduce the rich chemistry of insertionmaterials and highlight their relevance in energy applications.
      • To demonstrate the importance of defect chemistry with particular relevance to energy materials.
      • To provide a basic understanding of superconductivityand the chemistry of superconducting materials.​ 

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the application of diffraction methods to the characterisation of key material types in the solid state.

      ​Students will become familiar with a range of properties displayed by solids, particularly cooperative magnetism, ferroelectricity and multiferroicity, and how these relate to structure and symmetry.

      ​Student will be able to demonstrate a grasp of the importance of intercalation/insertion chemistry in energy storage applications (batteries).

      ​Students will develop the ability to relate fundamental concepts of diffraction, characterisation etc. in solid state chemistry to prctical applications in energy storage and related materials.

    • Supramolecular Chemistry: C Option (CHEM443)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      Supramolecular chemistry deals with the interactions between molecules and has become one of the fundamental areas of chemical research. This module aims to introduce students to supramolecular chemistry through lectures and a tutorial. In this module students will attend 15 lectures and 1 tutorial. The general aims of the module are to introduce and develop the students’ knowledge of

      • the chemistry of molecular assemblies and intermolecular bonds, or chemistry beyond the molecule
      • concepts of non-covalent chemistry, host-guest chemistry, molecular recognition, self-assembly and self-organisation.
      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of this module the students will be

      • knowledgeable of non-covalent bonding such as hydrogen-bonding, ion-ion interactions, ion-dipole interactions, van der Waals forces, pi-pi stacking interactions, solvatophobic forces etc. with respect to  supramolecular chemistry.
      • able to describe, understand and rationalise a range of supramolecular assemblies
    • Main Group Organic Chemistry 1: C Option (CHEM431)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to broaden and extend the knowledge of modern Organic Chemistry so that students will be able to enter directly into a PhD or embark on a career as a specialist chemist.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module students will have achieved a solid foundation in Organic Chemistry. In particular they will have a clear understanding of

      • Main Group Organic Chemistry
      • Organopalladium Chemistry
      and be able to give examples of their use in modern synthetic methodology.
    • Electrochemistry (c Option) (CHEM453)
      LevelM
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to develop the students knowledge of interfacial electrochemistry. This includes both the understanding of fundamental aspects of electrochemistry, as well as techniques for characterising surfaces under electrochemical conditions. Applications of electrochemistry will also be discussed.

      Learning Outcomes

      The students be knowledgeable on what happens when an aqueous medium is in the vicinity of the surface and be able to describe the structure that occurs in an electrochemical cell. They should be able to describe how cyclic voltammetry and potential step methods can be used to analyse and understand electrochemical reactions. They should be able to perform an electrochemical kinetic analysis of simple and multistep reactions as a means of analysing the mechanism. They should be able to analyse and to answer questions on a number of electrochemical reactions such as metal deposition, electroorganic reactions and adsorption. They should be able to describe fuel cell reactions (hydrogen/air and methanol/air) and be able to analyse fuel cell polarisation curves. They should also be aware of modern spectroscopic methods employed for analysing the solid/liquid interface and be able to describe the level of detail which can be obtained through appropriate application of these techniques.

    The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


    Teaching and Learning

    Laboratory classes in Years One and Two prepare you for independent laboratory work in Years Three and Four. In Year Three you will carry out mini research projects, while in Year Four you will carry out research alongside PhD and postdoctoral researchers on cutting-edge projects, often leading to a first scientific publication. Computational modelling and molecular visualisation are introduced as interactive animated models from Year One, reinforced as a key skill in later years and by Year Four of MChem programmes you will be able to perform your own calculations to underpin final year research projects.


    Assessment

    You are assessed by examination at the end of each semester (January and May/June) and by continuous assessment of laboratory practicals, class tests, workshops, tutorials and assignments. You have to pass each year of study before you are allowed to progress to the following year. Re-sit opportunities are available in September at the end of Years One and Two. If you take an industrial placement, a minimum standard of academic performance is required before you are allowed to embark on your placements. You are expected to perform at a 2:1 level if you wish to continue on a MChem programme. All years of study (with the exception of Year One) contribute to the final degree classification.