Chemistry for Sustainable Energy (MChem)

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
  • Opportunity to study for a year in China Offers a Year in China
  • This degree is accreditedAccredited

Key information


chemistry-1

Module details

Programme Year One

In the first year, you will take modules that cover the fundamentals of Inorganic, Organic and Physical Chemistry, plus necessary key skills, totalling 90 credits. Four Chemistry modules combine theoretical and practical aspects and one Chemistry module develops Quantitative and General Key Skills.

You will spend 3 to 6 hours per week in the laboratory and so will receive a comprehensive training in practical aspects of the subject.

In addition, you will have a choice of 30 credits of subsidiary modules from other Departments including Environmental Sciences, Biological or Biomedical Sciences (Anatomy, Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Pharmacology or Physiology), Mathematics, Physics and Archaeology.

There are also optional courses within Chemistry covering, eg. the Chemistry-Biology interface, and in the second semester you can opt to take a research inspired course ‘Innovative Chemistry for Energy and Materials’ delivered by staff in the Stephenson Institute for Renewable Energy.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Innovative Chemistry for Energy and Materials (CHEM184)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to give students an understanding of:
    1. The underlying principles of the chemistry of electrochemical storage devices (batteries, supercapacitors) and energy conversion devices (fuel cells).
    2. The fundamentals of solar energy conversion including photovoltaics and artificial solar synthesis.
    3. How chemistry impacts strongly on everyday devices - using the "smart phone" as an illustrative example to introduce concepts of modern displays (liquid crystal, organic LED), coating technology and transistors.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module a student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of:
    * simple chemical and electrochemical reactions
    * the relationship between fundamental materials properties and technological applications
    * the role of chemistry in complex multidisciplinary technologies
    * basic principles of battery/supercapacitor electrochemistry - such as the electric double layer
    * calculation of theoretical specific energies and energy densities
    * challenges and goals of research in energy storage/conversion devices
    * intercalation of ions into host structures
    * the basic principle of operation of a fuel cell
    * basic theory of semiconductors
    * different classes of photovoltaic devices
    * basic principles of an artificial leaf
    * the chemical technologies involved in the realisation of the "smart phone"
    * liquid crystalline state and optical anisotropy
    * the origin of electrical conductivity

    (S1) A student will be able to demonstrate the following skills:
    * self-study - via independent reading of suggested review articles
    * critical thinking - for example there are many different energy storage devices with adventagous and disadventagous propeties and scientific challenges to overcome - and the students ability to evaluate material presented to them can be assessed by short essay question in the examination

  • Chem111 Introductory Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to give students an understanding of the underlying principles of the chemistry of the main group elements and to give them an appreciation of the importance of this chemistry in everyday life.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understanding of the periodic table as an underlying framework for understanding the chemistry of the main group elements

    (LO2) Understanding of the crystal structures of metals and simple ionic solids

    (LO3) Understanding of Lewis acid-Lewis base interactions

    (LO4) Understanding of Bronsted-Lowry acid-base concepts

    (LO5) Understanding of systematic chemistry of halides, hydrides and oxides of the main group elements

    (LO6) Understanding of the basic techniques required for the preparation and analysis of simple inorganic compounds

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Planning and time-management associated with practical work

    (S3) Report writing

  • Chem130 Introductory Organic Chemistry (CHEM130)
    Level1
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to ensure that students are aware of fundamental principles of organic chemistry, including nomenclature, structure and bonding, and the basic principles of static and dynamic stereochemistry. The major reactions associated with the common functional groups will be covered with emphasis on reaction mechanisms. In addition, this module will provide an introduction to the basic techniques associated with practical synthetic chemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module students will know:
    * Structures and shapes of major classes of organic compounds;
    * Principles of bonding in major classes of organic compounds;
    * Basic principles of stereochemistry;
    * Important reactions of a range of functional groups;
    * An understanding of the major classes of reaction mechanisms;
    * The basic techniques of synthetic chemistry (isolation, purification, identification, and design and work-up of reactions)
    and they will have experience of characterisation using spectroscopic techniques and chemical methods.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

  • Chem152 Introductory Physical Chemistry (CHEM152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    The main aim of this module is to equip students with an understanding of basic kinetics and thermodynamics as they relate to chemical reactions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students should be familiar with, and be able to make appropriate use of basic ideas of energy changes in chemical reactions

    (LO2) By the end of the module students should be familiar with, and be able to make appropriate use of ideas relating to the rates of chemical reactions

    (LO3) By the end of the module students should have developed basic laboratory skills and be able to write simple experimental reports which include data and error analysis.

    (S1) By the end of the module students will have developed their problem solving skills

    (S2) By the end of the module students will have developed their organisational skills

  • Introductory Spectroscopy (CHEM170)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce modern spectroscopic methods in chemistry.

    Students will understand and be able to apply:
    o the importance of quantum mechanics in understanding atomic structure
    o the interaction of light with matter
    o atomic and molecular spectroscopy
    o information obtained from different spectroscopic techniques
    o the interpretation of spectroscopic data for deduction of molecular structure

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students should be able to demonstrate:
    * an understanding of atomic structure.
    * an understanding of the fundamental principles behind rotational, vibrational, electronic spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
    * an understanding of the application of spectroscopic techniques to elucidate molecular structure.
    * the ability to apply this knowledge to real spectroscopic problems.

  • Key Skills for Chemists 1 (CHEM180)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting20:80
    Aims

    The aim of this module is:
    (i) to equip students with the basic quantitative transferable skills required for the first year of a Chemistry degree programme. (60% of module)
    (ii) to broaden a student's perspective of chemistry whilst developing their general transferable skills with a focus on communication and employability. (40% of module)

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Quantitative key skills: By the end of this module a successful student should be able to handle:
    * simple volumetric calculations as required for titrations in analytical chemistry
    * Basic algebraic manipulation and functions needed for kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics
    * Elementary geometry required for the understanding of molecular shapes and solid state chemistry
    * The representation of data via graphs, particularly straight line graphs, and the manipulation of data in spreadsheet programs for data analysis
    * The basic idea of a derivative and an integral for use in physical chemistry

    (LO2) General key skills:  By the end of this module a successful student will understand:
    * basic aspects of working safely in a chemistry laboratory
    * aspects of chemical research
    * the importance of chemistry in the development of our society
    * chemical databases
    * the need for academic integrity
    * how chemistry can contribute to their transferable skills

    (S1) successful students will have developed their:
    * investigative, critical, writing and presentation skills
    * chemical database skills
    * employability skills

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Chemistry for Sustainable Technologies (CHEM284)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    • To explain the concepts and terminology of sustainability and sustainable development.
    • To highlight the role of science and technology in working towards sustainable development.
    • To illustrate the central role of metrics in the critical and comparative assessment of the efficiency and impact of chemical technologies.
    • To exemplify new approaches to chemistry in the development of more sustainable chemical technologies.
    • To provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the principles of Green Chemistry and a fundamental knowledge in new technologies for the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the basic terminology of sustainable development and 'green' chemistry

    (LO2) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the non-rigorous nature of this terminology and its consequences

    (LO3) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of 'green' chemistry

    (LO4) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the importance of catalysis in developing sustainable chemical technologies and the challenges associated with their implementation

    (LO5) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the basics of new technologies in the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

  • Coordination and Organometallic Chemistry of the D-block Metals (CHEM214)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of the module are:
    • To outline how bonding theories (crystal field, ligand field) have been developed by chemists to rationalise important properties of the d–block elements and to introduce the theory underlying the use of appropriate physical and spectroscopic techniques for characterising d–block complexes, and examples of their application.
    • To illustrate the chemistry of the transition elements by a detailed study of three d-block triads and introduce the chemistry, and some applications, of complexes in low oxidation states.
    • To explain the mechanisms by which transition metal complexes exchange ligands.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students should be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of transition-metal chemistry
    • Show an understanding of the concepts, applications and limitations of the different bonding theories relevant to transition-metal complex chemistry, and be aware of their relative relevance in different chemical contexts.
    • Be able to identify key elements of the structures of transition-metal complexes, and apply their knowledge of spectroscopic and physical techniques to work out the correct structure for a complex, given relevant chemical and spectroscopic information.
    • Be able to describe the social, economic and technological importance of selected transition elements.
    • Understand and be able to describe the significance of the syntheses, characterisation and chemistry of 3d metal complexes
    • Understand the origin of the 18-electron rule, its application and the sort of complexes to which it applies.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of ligand field and other factors in determining how metal complexes undergo ligand exchange.
    • Appreciate the bonding of different organic fragments to transition metals and how a variety of physical measurements can be used to substantiate these ideas.

  • Functional Organic Materials (CHEM241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of this module are to:
    • Provide students with an understanding of how synthetic polymers are synthesised and characterised.
    • Enable students to understand the relationship between the structure and properties of organic materials.
    • Develop knowledge on some important characterisation techniques used for organic materials.
    • Give the students an insight into some of the organic materials research ongoing at the University of Liverpool.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to; name common monomers and polymers, describe different synthetic routes to produce polymers and discuss basic characterisation of synthetic polymers.

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand how to characterise organic crystalline and porous materials.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of how functional organic materials are synthesised, and show an understanding of the relationship between the structure and properties of a material.

    (LO4) Students will be able to outline how to design materials for specific applications.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S3) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S4) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the essentials facts, concepts, principles and theories relating to functional organic materials

    (S5) The ability to recognise and analyse problems and plan strategies for their solution

  • Inorganic Applications of Group Theory (CHEM316)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to demonstrate the underlying importance of symmetry throughout Chemistry, with particular applications to spectroscopic selection rules and bonding.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to identify symmetry elements in molecules

    (LO2) By the end of the module, students should be able to assign molecules to their correct point groups

    (LO3) By the end of the module, students should be able to use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding

  • Measurements in Chemistry (CHEM246)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to instruct students in the practice of taking physical measurements, the critical analysis and evaluation of experimental data, the application of measurements to the study of chemical phenomena and the dissemination of results.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to
    1. Take physical measurements of varying complexity using a wide range of experimental techniques;
    2. Assess the risks involved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner;
    3. Choose appropriate methods for the analysis of data;
    4. Analyse experimental data using graphs, spreadsheets and linear regression;
    5. Assess the accuracy and significance of experimental results;
    6. Apply the results of physical measurement to the interpretation of chemical phenomena;
    7. Combine units and perform a dimensional analysis;
    8. Have experience of the application of spectroscopic techniques (UV, IR, NMR and mass spectrometry) in the characterization of organometallic and inorganic compounds;
    9. Organise and plan their time effectively.

  • Organic Chemistry II (CHEM231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions within a mechanistic and synthetic framework, together with exposure to a selection of stereochemical issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to solve problems featuring:
    * Scope and mechanisms of basic reactions (nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions, addition and elimination reactions).
    * Basic carbonyl chemistry (alkylation, acylation, aldol, conjugate additions).
    * Structure, reactivity and synthesis of simple heterocycles (including pyridines, pyrroles, furans).
    * Functional group interconversions and stereochemistry.

  • Physical Chemistry II (CHEM260)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    • To explain the application of the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics to chemical reactions.
    • To reinforce the basic ideas on factors affecting the rates of chemical reactions and quantify the kinetics.
    • To provide an introduction into basic concepts of quantum mechanics.
    • To advance knowledge of quantitative analysis of molecular spectra.
    • To make students familiar with the basic ideas of photochemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of the laws of thermodynamics and how they can be applied to thermochemical calculations

    (LO2) Show ability to employ the methods of chemical kinetics to describe and analyse the time-dependence of chemical processes.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics, including operators and wavefunctions, and their application to simple systems.

    (LO4) Show an understanding of different types of molecular energy levels, the forms of spectroscopy which involve transitions between them, and how molecular quantities can be extracted from the spectra.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S3) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S5) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

  • Preparative Chemistry: Synthesis and Characterisation (CHEM245)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to present a unified approach to the synthesis and characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will build on techniques introduced in the first year laboratory courses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will complete a number of different experiments and synthetic techniques across synthetic, organic and inorganic chemistry.

    (LO2) Students will appreciate how spectroscopic techniques can be used in the characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will be able to use analytical and spectroscopic methods to characterise their synthesised compounds.

    (LO3) Students will make use of scientific databases during some assignments and an electronic report.

    (LO4) Students will assess the risks involved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner.

    (LO5) Students should be able to organise and plan their time effectively

    (LO6) Students will experience working collaboratively with others in multiple learning environments

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Teamwork

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Biological Energy Conversion Processes (CHEM382)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    • To discuss how fundamental energy conversion in nature occurs by storage of energy in the form of concentration gradients across membranes.
    • To introduce chemically pathways for the photosynthesis, respiration, ATP synthesis, the Calvin cycle, the citrate cycle, fermentation
    • To show the mechanisms behind active transport, nerve signalling, the K/Na pump, muscle contraction and molecular motors.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to show a comprehension of energy conversion processes found in nature

    (LO2) Students will be able to describe the important points relating to chemical processes in photosynthesis respiration, ATP synthesis, the Calvin cycle, the citrate cycle and fermentation

    (LO3) Student will be able to describe the significance of concentration gradients across membranes in biological systems.

    (LO4) Students will be able to discuss the mechanisms behind active transport, nerve signalling, the K/Na pump, muscle contraction and molecular motors

  • Biorenewable Chemicals From Biomass (CHEM384)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    • To provide the students with basic knowledge of the chemistry of biomass and its applications.
    • To develop the skills required to evaluate routes to biorenewable chemicals, taking into consideration current economic, technological and sustainability issues.
    • To provide the students with an understanding of the current transformations that the chemical industry is undergoing and to enable them to identify potential business opportunities.
    • To provide the students with updated knowledge and skills in an emerging industrial activity that will widen and enhance career options.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The students should be able to demonstrate and apply nderstanding of the main biorefinity models

    (LO2) The students should be able to demonstrate and apply knowledge of Biomass composition and its sources

    (LO3) The students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main systhetic routes to derive chemicals from biomass

    (LO4) The students should be able to demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of the main biorefinity models

    (LO5) The students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the sustainability issues associated with the use of biomass

    (LO6) The students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the main technologies, companies, industries, challenges and trends in the emerging bioeconomy

    (LO7) The students should be able to identify and critically evaluate routes and opportunities to desired chemicals from biomass, taking into account pathways for commercialisation

    (LO8) Students should be able to identify the potential applications of bioderived chemicals

    (S1) skills in the evaluation, interpretation and synthesis of chemical information and data

    (S2) the ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of essential facts,concepts, principles and theories relating to renewable chemicals and biomass transformations

    (S3) skills in communicating scientific material and arguments

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Media analysis

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S6) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S7) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S8) Skills in using technology - Information accessing

    (S9) Commercial awareness - Relevant understanding of organisations

  • Catalysis (CHEM368)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to give students a broad, interdisciplinary, background in catalysis across the traditional divides within chemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should:
    * be able to speculate about possible reaction mechanisms given experimental observations.
    * be able to recognize mechanistic parallels between chemical and biocatalytic processes.
    * be aware of the most significant applications of organometallic catalysis be able to propose a likely mechanism for a new catalytic reaction and to propose experiments designed to confirm or refute their proposal.
    * be able to evaluate the experimental evidence for and against a proposed mechanism for reaction that uses an organometallic catalyst.
    * possess a realistic integrated understanding and knowledge of the basic principles of heterogeneous catalysis.
    * be able to derive appropriate kinetic equations and models for catalytic reactions that may involve complicated reaction sequences.
    * be aware of special effects which may influence selectivity when microporous solids are used as catalysts.

  • Further Organic Chemistry (CHEM333)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to extend second year knowledge of synthetic and physical organic chemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to show:
    * a good understanding of modern synthetic reactions and their mechanisms.
    * deduce mechanisms on the basis of kinetic and other evidence.

  • Chem313 - Inorganic Materials Chemistry (CHEM313)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to
    • Enhance students' understanding of the fundamental nature of ordered crystalline solids
    • Develop the concept that the structure of materials impact on their properties and applications
    • Provide an introduction to the use of diffraction methods to characterise crystal structures
    • Describe characterisation techniques, for both crystalline and amorphous materials.
    • Outline electronic structure in the solid state.
    • Describe a range of materials manufacturing techniques.
    • Explain the origin of magnetism in the solid state.
    • Outline the practical implications of magnetic materials
    • Describe how we make and study magnetic inorganic solids
    • Highlight current research trends in inorganic magneto chemistry

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and describe the characteristics of the crystalline solid state

    (LO2) Be able to perform simple analyses of powder X-ray diffraction data

    (LO3) Describe the factors affecting the crystal structures formed by ionic compounds

    (LO4) Understand that solid structures directly influences the physical and functional properties of materials, and describe examples

    (LO5) Understand the solid-state electronic structure of inorganic materials

    (LO6) Recognise favourable methods for fabrication, characterisation, and functional property optimisation of specific materials.

    (LO7) Appreciate the real-world relevance of materials design.

    (LO8) Understand the microscopic origins of magnetism, and describe the mechanisms which lead to collective magnetic behaviour

    (LO9) Interpret magnetic data and classify types of inorganic magnetic materials.

    (LO10) Recognise the uses of magnetic materials.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

  • Practical Chemistry Yr 3 (mchem) (CHEM375)
    Level3
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:99
    Aims

    The general aims of the module are:
    • To give the student practical experience and understanding of advanced practical techniques in three areas from: Organic, Inorganic, Physical and Computational Chemistry.
    • To develop appropriate techniques for each type of experiment
    • To show the use of suitable characterisation and numerical techniques
    • To make valid deductions from acquired data
    • To familiarise the student with the preparation of written reports
    • To introduce structured programming in PYTHON (if computational option chosen)
    • To establish a close link with aspects of the lecture material covered in the Yr2 and Yr3 course

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to
    * Carry out advanced practical techniques in three of the areas of Organic, Inorganic, Physical Chemistry and Computational Chemistry
    * Give a reasoned written exposition of experimental or computational work and achievements
    * Make valid deductions from acquired data
    * Give comprehensible written accounts of experimental work
    * Demonstrate an understanding of shortcomings, experimental errors or weaknesses in data
    * Further develop their time management skills via coordination of the synthetic and analytical components of their experiments
    * Develop strategies for structured programming and user-friendly, re-usable code in PYTHON to solve numerically Physical Chemistry models (if computational option chosen)

  • Chem366 - Practical Chemistry Project Year 3 - An Introduction to Research Methods (CHEM366)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module is a Year 3 mini research project with the aim of introducing MChem students to research methods in chemistry through research projects in research labs. In this module, students will be allocated to research groups to work on projects of synthetic (organic or inorganic), physical (catalysis, electrochemistry, surface science, modelling, nanoparticles), materials or interdisciplinary themes, according to their own interests and abilities, and therefore the specific aims will differ slightly according to topic.
    The general aims of the module are:
    • To give the student a taste of research in a research lab environment
    • To develop of appropriate experimental technique for the topic undertaken
    • To show the use of appropriate characterisation techniques
    • To illustrate the use of the library and other information resources as research tools
    • To gain initial experience of how to approach a research project
    • To familiarise the student with the preparation of written reports
    • To teach the skills necessary for the preparation and delivery of a short oral presentation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to:
    * Give a reasoned written exposition of experimental work and achievements;
    * Make valid deductions from acquired data;
    * Be capable of giving comprehensible written and oral accounts of experimental work;
    * Demonstrate an understanding of shortcomings, experimental errors or weakness in data.
    * Show that they understand the wider social and/or technological relevance of their work

Year Four Compulsory Modules

  • Chem480 - Chemical Research Project (CHEM480)
    LevelM
    Credit level60
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to develop the specific and generic skills necessary to undertake independent research in chemistry. This is achieved by carrying out a research project in an area of chemical research that is presently active in the department.

    In addition, the module aims to advance students' skills in molecular modelling techniques and chemical database skills, which are crucial in all areas of chemistry, and their employability skills. The general aims of this component of the module are:
    • To introduce students to further molecular modelling techniques, so that they can apply molecular modelling software in studies of a variety of chemical systems.
    • To ensure that students can choose the appropriate modelling technique for a given system and are able to perform calculations and interpret the data from the calculations.
    • To remind students of chemical literature, References, Referencing, Databases, Chemical search strategy, Text based searches (Web of Science), Boolean operators, Wildcards, structure based searches (Reaxys).
    • To introduce students to other aspects of the chemical literature, such as Patents, Scifinder, the Chemical Database Service and crystallographic databases.
    • To enhance students employability skills concerning career planning, skills review and skills profiling.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module, students will have:
    • Acquired advanced laboratory and/or computational/theoretical skills.
    • Developed the ability to work independently and be self-critical in the evaluation of risks, experimental procedures and outcomes.
    • Acquired competence in the planning, design and execution of experiments.
    • Acquired the ability to use an understanding of the limits of accuracy of experimental data to inform the planning of future work.
    • Acquired time-management and organisational skills.

    (LO2) By the end of the molecular modelling section of the module, successful students will:
    • Be able to predict the ground state energy and structure of isolated molecules (for relatively simple systems).
    • Be able to estimate equilibrium constants, rate constants and calculate transition states for simple reactions.
    • Be able to rationalise some aspects of reactivity (e.g. charge density, frontier orbitals).
    • Be able to identify an appropriate molecular modelling method relevant to their research project.

    (LO3) By the end of the chemical database section of the module, a successful student will have gained:
    • the ability to perform chemical literature searches based on text and structure based searching;
    • the ability to appropriately reference a scientific document;
    • knowledge and ability to view and extract structural information from X-ray structures.

    (LO4) By the end of the employability section of the module, a successful student will have constructed a personalised action plan of their own employability priorities and engaged with a new activity to address their priorities.

    (S1) Communication skills (oral, written, following instructions/protocols/procedures, academic writing, report writing, communicating to an audience, visual)

    (S2) Time and project management skills (personal organisation, project planning)

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving (critical analysis, evaluation, problem identification, creative thinking)

    (S4) Skills in working in groups and teams (group action planning, listening, respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others)

    (S5) Information skills (critical reading, evaluation, information accessing, record keeping)

    (S6) Research skills (information skill, awareness of /commitment to academic integrity, developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, using data, applying research methods, applying ethics)

    (S7) Information Technology skills (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S8) Numeracy/computational skills (reason with numbers/mathematical concepts, confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers, problem solving)

    (S9) Personal attributes and qualities (resilience, initiative, flexibility/adaptability, willingness to take responsibility, self-efficacy, integrity)

    (S10) Improving own learning/performance (reflection, self-awareness/self-analysis, action planning)

    (S11) Literacy (ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning)

    (S12) Media literacy (online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media)

    (S13) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

    (S14) Ethical awareness

  • Electrochemistry (c Option) (CHEM453)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to develop the students' knowledge of interfacial electrochemistry. This includes both the understanding of fundamental aspects of electrochemistry, as well as techniques for characterising surfaces under electrochemical conditions. Applications of electrochemistry will also be discussed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The students be knowledgeable on what happens when an aqueous medium is in the vicinity of the surface and be able to describe the structure that occurs in an electrochemical cell. They should be able to describe how cyclic voltammetry and potential step methods can be used to analyse and understand electrochemical reactions. They should be able to perform an electrochemical kinetic analysis of simple and multistep reactions as a means of analysing the mechanism. They should be able to analyse and to answer questions on a number of electrochemical reactions such as metal deposition, electroorganic reactions and adsorption. They should be able to describe fuel cell reactions (hydrogen/air and methanol/air) and be able to analyse fuel cell polarisation curves. They should also be aware of modern spectroscopic methods employed for analysing the solid/liquid interface and be able to describe the level of detail which can be obtained through appropriate application of these techniques.

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive abilities and skills, ie abilities and skills relating to intellectual tasks, including problem-solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement. In particular, at master's level, they will gain the ability to adapt and apply methodology to the solution of unfamiliar problems.

  • Nano Energy Materials (CHEM482)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of the module are:
    • To provide an introduction of the application of nanomaterials in energy systems
    • To show how nanomaterials have wide use relevant to catalysis, plasmonic heating, thermal and hydrogen energy storage materials.
    • To illustrate fundamental material aspects of carbons in energy storage
    • To introduce basic semiconductor materials used for energy storage
    • To demonstrate some routine methods of nanoparticle synthesis

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to describe the desirable material properties in metals, polymers, inorganic salts, semiconductors and carbons for energy harvesting and storage.

    (LO2) Ability to discuss the advantages of nanomaterials in energy generation, thermal and hydrogen energy storage systems making logical conclusions.

    (LO3) Ability to demonstrate the application of nanomaterials in the diverse energy systems.

    (LO4) Ability to show understanding of different chemical processes in thermal and electrical energy storage

    (LO5) Ability to discuss principles and limitations of nanomaterials in renewable energy storage.

  • Solar Energy Conversion (CHEM464)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To impart knowledge on the underpinning theory of electronic structure of solids relevant to solar energy conversion and to demonstrate the application of these fundamental concepts in applied solar energy conversion technologies

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Show an ability to describe - and provide evidence for understanding of - the electronic structure of solids in terms of bands.

    (LO2) Show understanding of electronic structure as a function of reciprocal space (bands) and energy (density of states).

    (LO3) Show ability to describe the electronic structure of semiconductors and demonstrate how that relates to applications in solar energy conversion

    (LO4) Show understanding of transport in semiconductors in terms of electrons and holes, and how they are created and destroyed in the process of photoexcitation

    (LO5) Show ability to describe minimum device requirements for solar photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical devices and to reproduce the structure and relevant energy diagrams for p-n Si devices and photoanodes and photocathodes.

    (LO6) Show an ability to discuss the principles and limitations of selected 2nd, 3rd generation PV technologies

    (LO7) Show an ability to apply equations to calculate carrier properties, cell efficiencies and optical properties.

  • Chem442 - Solid State Chemistry and Energy Storage Materials (CHEM442)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    • To provide an introduction to diffraction methods for the characterisation of solid state materials.
    • To introduce the students to the concepts and applications of symmetry in the solid state.
    • To provide an introduction to the structures of solid state materials and their description and phase transitions.
    • To provide a perspective on the ranges of properties displayed by solids, particularly cooperative magnetism, ferroelectricity, and multiferroicity and their relationships to structure and symmetry.
    • To introduce the rich chemistry of insertion materials and highlight their relevance in energy applications.
    • To demonstrate the importance of defect chemistry with particular relevance to energy materials.
    • To provide a basic understanding of superconductivity and the chemistry of superconducting materials.
    This will provide the student with a deep and high level understanding of the properties of solids, and currently active areas of research, to enable the student to pursue their interests to a deeper level independently (for example to PhD level).

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the application of diffraction methods to the characterisation of key material types in the solid state.

    (LO2) Students will become familiar with a range of properties displayed by solids, particularly cooperative magnetism, ferroelectricity and multiferroicity, and how these relate to structure and symmetry.

    (LO3) Student will be able to demonstrate a grasp of the importance of intercalation/insertion chemistry in energy storage applications (batteries).

    (LO4) Students will develop the ability to relate fundamental concepts of diffraction, characterisation etc. in solid state chemistry to practical applications in energy storage and related materials.

    (S1) Critical thinking (e.g. compare and contrast different energy storage devices and their advantageous and disadvantageous properties, scientific challenges etc.)

    (S2) Self-study via reading and understanding suggested review articles

Year Four Optional Modules

  • Advanced Spectroscopy (c Option) (CHEM451)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This is an advanced module that aims to introduce the student to modern spectroscopic techniques and their applications in materials characterisation. Emphasis is given to those techniques, which are currently most important to chemical research both in industry and academia. The students should be able to understand the basic physical principles of these techniques and to decide which combination of techniques is best employed to tackle a particular problem of materials characterisation.

    The module will deal in-depth with

    - vibrational spectroscopies (infrared reflection absorption, attenuated total internal reflection and surface enhanced Raman) and their application to the study of molecules at surfaces relevant to materials characterisation, heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience;

    - electronic spectroscopies (X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger, energy dispersive Xray spectroscopy) and their application to determine the chemical composition of interfaces.

    The module will also cover a range of other analytical chemistry tools suitable for interface and materials characterisation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, successful students should have gained an in-depth understanding of a range of advanced spectroscopies and be able to explain the physical principles of these spectroscopies, analyse spectra and be able to discuss their suitability to address certain problems of materials characterisation.

    (LO2) Successful students should be able to explain surface vibrational spectroscopy (infrared absorption and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy), interpret spectra and apply selection rules to determine the orientation of molecules at surfaces.

    (LO3) Successful students should be able to explain electronic spectroscopies (photoelectron, Auger, energy dispersive Xray spectroscopy), interpret spectra and deduce surface chemical composition based on quantitative and qualitative analysis

    (LO4) Successful students should be able to critically compare different methods of spectroscopy and their suitability to tackle a particular problem in materials characterisation

    (LO5) Successful students should be able to critically evaluate the use of spectroscopy to support scientific conclusions based on literature

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S2) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

  • Application of Enzymes in Organic Synthesis - Industrial Biotechnology (CHEM486)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the application of enzymes and how to apply them in organic synthesis. Students will gain insight into modern methods of mutagenesis for enzyme optimisation and also cutting edge approaches to designing artificial enzymes and assemblage of cascade pathways for synthesis.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to understand how enzymes can be applied in organic synthesis.

    (LO2) By the end of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of how genes encode enzyme 3Dstructure

    (LO3) By the end of the module, students should be able to understand factors governing the selection of biocatalyst and biocatalyst type.

    (LO4) By the end of the module, students should be show an understanding of cofactor requirements and recycling strategies in redox biotransformations.

    (LO5) By the end of the module, students should show a knowledge of the advantages and limitations in the application of biocatalysts.

    (LO6) By the end of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge of enzyme immobilization methods.

    (LO7) By the end of the module, students should be able to show an understanding of basic molecular biology and use for mutagenesis and directed evolution methods to improve enzyme activity or selectivity.

    (LO8) By the end of the module, students should have an appreciation of new approaches for creating artificial enzymes.

    (LO9) By the end of this module studenst should be able to understand how enzyme reactions can be assembled into multistep cascade synthetic pathways

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive abilities and skills, i.e. abilities and skills relating to intellectual tasks, including problem-solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement. In particular, at master's level, they will gain the ability to adapt and apply methodology to the solution of unfamiliar problems.

  • Asymmetric Catalysis for Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry (CHEM496)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to introduce students to the main aspects of asymmetric catalysis and its application in synthetic organic chemistry. Students will gain:
    • An understanding of the importance of asymmetric catalysis.
    • An understanding of the fundamental principles and mechanisms of asymmetric catalysis.
    • An understanding of the applications of asymmetric catalysis in fine chemicals and pharmaceutical synthesis.
    • An opportunity to consider new developments in the field, especially those that introduce new concepts and/or underpin new environmentally benign processes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the importance of asymmetric catalysis in chemical synthesis.

    (LO2) An understanding of the fundamental principles and mechanisms of asymmetric catalysis.

    (LO3) A grasp of the various aspects of asymmetric catalysis ranging from metal-catalysed redox reactions through kinetic resolution to oranocatalytic C-C bond formation.

    (LO4) An understanding of the applications of asymmetric catalysis in fine chemicals and pharmaceutical synthesis.

    (LO5) An ability to evaluate the experimental evidence for and against a proposed mechanism for an asymmetric catalytic reaction

    (LO6) An ability to propose a rational synthetic pathway for a specific chiral molecule

    (LO7) An ability to propose a likely mechanism for a new asymmetric catalytic reaction.

    (LO8) An opportunity to consider new developments in the field, especially those that feature new concepts and/or underpin new environmentally benign processes.

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive abilities and skills, i.e. abilities and skills relating to intellectual tasks, including problem-solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement. In particular, at master's level, they will gain the ability to adapt and apply methodology to the solution of unfamiliar problems.

  • Asymmetric Synthesis and Synthetic Strategy (CHEM433)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to further broaden and extend the students' knowledge of modern Organic Chemistry, so that they will be able to enter directly into a PhD programme or embark on a career as a specialist chemist. Specifically, students will learn the concepts that enable stereo control in reactions and the fundamental disconnections in organic synthesis.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to understand and design strategies that enable the synthesis of complex organic molecules in a stereocontrolled fashion.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem-solving

    (S2) critical analysis of experimental results

  • Introduction to Nanomedicine (CHEM426)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of the module are to
    • explain colloidal/self-assembling systems in detail and their role in nanomedicine;
    • Inform about the state of the art of materials for nanomedicines and the synthetic routes used;
    • explain the pharmacological behaviour of nanomedicines and how different diseases require different approaches for successful treatment.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to show that they can define and explain colloidal systems and name examples of different colloids. They should demonstrate a detailed understanding of how colloidal stability can be obtained, and explain and utilise the principles behind calculating colloidal stability.

    (LO2) Students should be able to describe the different types of nanomedicines and discuss the range of advanced synthetic routes used to produce different nanomedicine structures for oral and injectable administration. They should understand the differences between conjugated and non-conjugated delivery systems, including self-assembled nanostructures and be able to explain the advanced methods available for the characterisation of nanomedicines.

    (LO3) Students will show understanding of the principles behind pharmacokinetics and the importance of these principles to nanomedicine. They will understand the different routes of administration used to deliver nanomedicines and be able to explain how different diseases present different challenges to drug delivery and how nanomedicines can be designed to targets specific diseases.

    (LO4) Students will be able to examine the state of the art for nanomedicines and discuss the future research directions.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Commercial awareness

    (S4) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

  • Lanthanoid and Actinoid Chemistry (CHEM411)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to give students an overview of the most important aspects of the unique chemistry and spectroscopy of the lanthanide and actinide elements, illustrated with contemporary examples of the applications of their compounds in chemistry and technology.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will understand the underlying principles of lanthanoid and actinoid chemistry, and how these differ from those of d-transition metal chemistry

    (LO2) Students will have an understanding of the most important aspects of spectroscopy of compounds of the lanthanoids

    (LO3) Students will have an appreciation of how recent research is developing applications for the elements and their compounds

    (LO4) Students will have appreciation of the strategic importance of the elements e.g. in nuclear power and sustainable energy applications

    (LO5) Students will be able to read and critically evaluate research papers from the recent literature

    (S1) Problem solving skills

  • Chem431 - Main Group Organic Chemistry (CHEM431)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to broaden and extend the knowledge of modern Organic Chemistry so that students will be able to enter directly into a PhD or embark on a career as a specialist chemist.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have achieved a solid foundation in Organic Chemistry. In particular they will have a clear understanding of Main Group Organic Chemistry and Organopalladium Chemistry and be able to give examples of their use in modern synthetic methodology.

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive abilities and skills, ie abilities and skills relating to intellectual tasks, including problem-solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement. In particular, at master's level, they will gain the ability to adapt and apply methodology to the solution of unfamiliar problems.

  • Modelling of Functional Materials and Interfaces (CHEM454)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    • To provide students with an introduction to modern computational chemistry methods and concepts for functional materials and interfaces. These methods will include primarily density functional theory methods for electronic structure but also an orientation towards wave function methods and classical molecular dynamics methods combined with force fields.

    • To understand how computational modelling can be used in research and development of functional materials and interfaces

    • To be able to assess results from such computational modelling

    • To prepare students to carry out competitive postgraduate research in Computational and Theoretical Chemistry, Materials Chemistry, and Functional Interfaces

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To describe the role and merits of wave function versus density methods

    (LO2) To describe some basic concepts of density functional theory such as: exchange-correlation functionals including some of their shortcomings and Kohn-Sham states

    (LO3) To gain a basic understanding of the behaviour of electrons in periodic structures: solids and interfaces

    (LO4) To be able to apply tight binding/Huckel to some simple situations

    (LO5) To describe what can be learnt from computation of total energies and forces

    (LO6) To describe origin of interatomic and molecular forces and relate them to electronic structure

    (LO7) To gain an understanding of force fields and their applicability

    (LO8) To describe the basics of classical molecular dynamics and thermostats

  • Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (CHEM474)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This is an advanced module that aims to introduce the student to modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques and their applications in analytical chemistry. The students will be able to understand the basic physical principles of NMR and to decide how to use it to tackle a particular problem of molecules and materials characterisation.

    In particular, the module will deal with- the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, including modern methods for the determination of chemical structure and intermolecular interactions in complex organic molecules, polymers and solids.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, successful students should have gained an in-depth understanding of NMR and be able to explain the physical principles of these spectroscopies, analyse spectra and be able to discuss their suitability to address certain problems of materials characterisation.

    (LO2) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to discuss the behaviour of nuclear spins and their ensembles in an external magnetic field and the influence of magnetic interaction on the appearance of NMR spectra.

    (LO3) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to describe the structure of modern NMR spectrometers,explain the concepts of data acquisition and processing and show anunderstanding of chemical shift, magnetisation, rotating frame of reference,scalar coupling and basic pulse programming

    (LO4) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to explain the origins of relaxation, the principles of the determination of T1 and T2 relaxation times, their calculation from NMRdata, and the relationship between relaxation and molecular motion

    (LO5) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to explain the nuclear Overhauser effect and its use in analysis of complex organic molecules;-

    (LO6) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to describe the main principles of one- and two dimensional experiments and interpret the spectra recorded for both liquids and solids

    (LO7) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to explain the differences in acquisition of solution and solid-state NMR spectra and specific methods used for solids (magic angle spinning, cross-polarisation and decoupling);-

    (LO8) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to describe experiments suitable for the analysis of internuclear connectivites, distances and mobility in organic and inorganicsolids

    (LO9) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to critically compare different methods of spectroscopy and their suitability to tackle a particular problem in materials characterization

    (LO10) By the end of the module, successful students should be able to critically evaluate the use of spectroscopy to support scientific conclusions based on literature

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive ability and skills, ie abilities and skills relating to intellectual tasks, including problem solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement. In particular, at master's level, they will gain the ability to adapt and apply methodology to the solution of unfamiliar problems.

  • Organic and Molecular Electronics (CHEM413)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aims of the module are:
    1. To show students how semiconducting organic molecules and materials can be designed and synthesised for use in a wide range of electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes, thin film transistors, photovoltaic devices and sensors.
    2. To introduce the students to current topics of interest in the field of molecular electronics, the science of incorporating single molecules into electrical circuits.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to show:
    * familiarity with important structure-property relationships in pi-conjugated materials, and how these relate to their uses as organic semiconductors in different electronic devices.
    * awareness of synthetic routes to the materials, and how these can limit or control their properties.
    * familiarity with important parameters used to assess the performance of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs, OTFTs and OPVDs.
    * awareness of current and possible future industrial applications of this new technology.
    * awareness of concepts underlying experiments to determine the electrical properties of single molecules, and of the significance of these measurements.
    * the ability to read and understand review papers from the literature in these areas.

  • Protein Structure and Dynamics (CHEM452)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to discuss the application of basic physical chemistry concepts for describing protein structure and dynamics and to show how advanced physical chemistry methods are used for investigating these important aspects of proteins.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to discuss the importance of protein structure and dynamics for understanding biological processes.

    (LO2) Ability to describe the experimental methods that are used to study structure, folding and fast dynamics of proteins.

    (LO3) Ability to discuss the physical chemistry principles underlying these methods and apply the basic equations needed for the analysis of such data.

    (LO4) Ability to describe and discuss some of the theoretical methods that are used to predict protein structure and and model protein folding/dynamics.

    (LO5) Ability to analyse PDB-structure files and create meaningful graphical representations from these files.

    (S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

  • Supramolecular Chemistry (CHEM446)
    LevelM
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Supramolecular chemistry deals with the interactions between molecules and has become one of the fundamental areas of chemical research. The aims of the module are to introduce and develop the students’ knowledge of the chemistry of molecular assemblies and intermolecular bonds, or "chemistry beyond the molecule". The module will introduce the concepts of non-covalent chemistry, host-guest chemistry, molecular recognition, self-assembly and self-organisation. The module also aims to develop the students' knowledge of how to characterise supramolecular complexes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to show understanding of the principles of non-covalent bonding such as hydrogen-bonding, ion-ion interactions, ion-dipole interactions, van der Waals forces, pi-pi stacking interactions, solvatophobic forces etc. with respect to  supramolecular chemistry.

    (LO2) Students will be able to show understanding of the underlying principles of complementarity, preorganisation, and cooperative interactions with respect to supramolecular chemistry, and be able to rationalise the characteristics of binding in a given supramolecular complex with respect to these three key concepts.

    (LO3) Students will be able to describe, show understanding of and rationalise a range of supramolecular assemblies, including their formation, their behaviour, and their applications in the context of supramolecular chemistry.

    (LO4) Students will be able to explain the principles of solvent effects on supramolecular complexes, why and how solvents affect the strength of supramolecular interactions, and design potential supramolecular hosts taking these principles into account.

    (LO5) Students will be able to evaluate which characterisation method is suitable for a given supramolecular complex (including NMR, ITC, MS, UV/Vis titration), and explain what the data show for each method.

    (LO6) Students will be able to comment critically on and synthesise a summary of the key messages from a recent research paper describing applications for supramolecular complexes.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Laboratory classes in Years One and Two prepare you for independent laboratory work in Years Three and Four. In Year Three you will carry out mini research projects, while in Year Four you will carry out research alongside PhD and postdoctoral researchers on cuttingedge projects, often leading to a first scientific publication. Computational modelling and molecular visualisation are introduced as interactive animated models from Year One, reinforced as a key skill in later years and by Year Four of MChem programmes you will be able to perform your own calculations to underpin final year research projects.


Assessment

You are assessed by examination at the end of each semester (January and May/June) and by continuous assessment of laboratory practicals, class tests, workshops, tutorials and assignments. You have to pass each year of study before you are allowed to progress to the following year. Re-sit opportunities are available in September at the end of Years One and Two. If you take an industrial placement, a minimum standard of academic performance is required before you are allowed to embark on your placements. You are expected to perform at a 2:1 level if you wish to continue on a MChem programme. All years of study (with the exception of Year One) contribute to the final degree classification.