Chemistry BSc (Hons)

Key information


chemistry-1

This programme offers a solid grounding in all aspects of chemistry, while allowing you to incorporate some non-chemical options to broaden your education.

Your programme shares a common chemistry core, differing only in optional modules with other chemistry programmes in the department. Your optional modules can be chosen from chemistry or non-chemistry courses. This provides a good measure of flexibility and choice for you during the first year at Liverpool.

Building on the foundation you developed at XJTLU, the first year in Liverpool progresses rapidly, with a mix of theory and practical modules to give you a solid grounding in the subject.

By your final year, you will be a proficient chemist, and you will be able to extend your knowledge in the three traditional branches of chemistry. You will also be offered a choice of optional chemistry and non-chemistry modules, or modules in
science education for those interested in pursuing a career in teaching. Practical modules in Year Three will continue to develop your skills and knowledge. This may involve conducting miniprojects, relevant in the modern world, to develop your skill set and make you industry-ready.

 Interested in finding out more? Jiaqi shares her experience on the course, below.

As XJTLU students will join Year 2 at The University of Liverpool, this PDF provides relevant module information for the following programme(s):

Cover for Chemistry 2+2

View our 2+2 Chemistry brochure.

Programme Year Two

You will learn more advanced topics within all the main branches of chemistry and continue to develop your quantitative and key skills.

Practical skills will be developed through stand-alone practical modules and you will have the opportunity to spend between six and nine hours per week in the laboratory.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Coordination and Organometallic Chemistry of the D-block Metals (CHEM214)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The aims of the module are:
    • To outline how bonding theories (crystal field, ligand field) have been developed by chemists to rationalise important properties of the d–block elements and to introduce the theory underlying the use of appropriate physical and spectroscopic techniques for characterising d–block complexes, and examples of their application.
    • To illustrate the chemistry of the transition elements by a detailed study of three d-block triads and introduce the chemistry, and some applications, of complexes in low oxidation states.
    • To explain the mechanisms by which transition metal complexes exchange ligands.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students should be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of transition-metal chemistry
    • Show an understanding of the concepts, applications and limitations of the different bonding theories relevant to transition-metal complex chemistry, and be aware of their relative relevance in different chemical contexts.
    • Be able to identify key elements of the structures of transition-metal complexes, and apply their knowledge of spectroscopic and physical techniques to work out the correct structure for a complex, given relevant chemical and spectroscopic information.
    • Be able to describe the social, economic and technological importance of selected transition elements.
    • Understand and be able to describe the significance of the syntheses, characterisation and chemistry of 3d metal complexes
    • Understand the origin of the 18-electron rule, its application and the sort of complexes to which it applies.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of ligand field and other factors in determining how metal complexes undergo ligand exchange.
    • Appreciate the bonding of different organic fragments to transition metals and how a variety of physical measurements can be used to substantiate these ideas.

  • Key Skills for Chemists 2 (CHEM280)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting10:90
    Aims

    1. To further develop the quantitative skills of a student, through more advanced skills in the application of mathematics, physics and information technology applicable to the second year of an undergraduate degree in chemistry.
    2. To introduce students to the use of Molecular Modelling in Chemistry
    3. To further develop a student's general transferable skills in oral and written communication and team working.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The overarching learning outcome is that students will gain the necessary key skills to perform well in their chemistry degree programmes.

    (LO2) Quantitative key skills: By the end of the module a successful student will have improved their ability to:
    * perform basic calculus (integral and differential) as applied to kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics
    * use partial differentiation in general problems and to categorise stationary points in functions of more than one variable
    * apply algebraic manipulation in kinetics, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics
    * apply the algebra of complex numbers in quantum mechanics problems
    * use basic matrix vector algebra
    * solve simple eigenvalue problems and compute determinants of small matrices

    (LO3) Molecular Modelling skills: By the end of this module, a successful student will have gained:
    * a qualitative understanding of ab initio, semi-empirical and empirical models, knowing which model is suitable for a particular type of problem.
    * the ability to predict the ground state energy and structure of isolated molecules (not too complicated) and estimate equilibrium constants (ΔH = ΔE) for simple reactions
    * the ability to rationalise some aspects of reactivity (charge density, frontier orbitals).
    * some experience of modelling intermolecular forces and complexes.

    (LO4) General Key Skills: by the end of this module, a successful student will have engaged in team-based activities and developed a range of new transferable and employability skills applicable to further study and wider employment.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) IT skills

    (S5) Communication skills

    (S6) Students will have further developed their chemistry-related cognitive abilities and skills as highlighted in the QAA Chemistry benchmark statement including (i) the ability to apply such knowledge and understanding to the solution of qualitative and quantitative problems ; (ii) skills in the practical applications of theory using computer software and models; (iii) skills in communicating scientific material and arguments; (iv) information technology and data-processing skills, relating to chemical information and data.

    (S7) Students will have generic skills developed in the context of chemistry that are of a general nature and applicable in many other contexts as highlighted in the QAA Chemistry benchmark statement including (i)communication skills (written and oral); (ii) problem-solving skills, relating to qualitative and quantitative information; (iii) numeracy and mathematical skills; (iv) information retrieval skills; (v) ICT skills; (vi) interpersonal skills, relating to the ability to interact with other people and to engage in team-working; (viii) time management and organisational skills.

  • Chem246 - Measurements in Chemistry (CHEM246)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to instruct students in the practice of taking physical measurements, the critical analysis and evaluation of experimental data, the application of measurements to the study of chemical phenomena and the dissemination of results.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to
    1. Take physical measurements of varying complexity using a wide range of experimental techniques;
    2. Assess the risks involved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner;
    3. Choose appropriate methods for the analysis of data;
    4. Analyse experimental data using graphs, spreadsheets and linear regression;
    5. Assess the accuracy and significance of experimental results;
    6. Apply the results of physical measurement to the interpretation of chemical phenomena;
    7. Combine units and perform a dimensional analysis;
    8. Have experience of the application of spectroscopic techniques (UV, IR, NMR and mass spectrometry) in the characterization of organometallic and inorganic compounds;
    9. Organise and plan their time effectively.

  • Organic Chemistry II (CHEM231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce important carbon-carbon bond forming reactions within a mechanistic and synthetic framework, together with exposure to a selection of stereochemical issues.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to solve problems featuring:
    * Scope and mechanisms of basic reactions (nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions, addition and elimination reactions).
    * Basic carbonyl chemistry (alkylation, acylation, aldol, conjugate additions).
    * Structure, reactivity and synthesis of simple heterocycles (including pyridines, pyrroles, furans).
    * Functional group interconversions and stereochemistry.

    (S1) The critical thinking and problem solving involved in drawing mechanisms and routes for the synthesis of unfamiliar molecules from given starting compounds (a precursor to retrosynthetic analysis)

  • Physical Chemistry II (CHEM260)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    • To explain the application of the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics to chemical reactions.
    • To reinforce the basic ideas on factors affecting the rates of chemical reactions and quantify the kinetics.
    • To provide an introduction into basic concepts of quantum mechanics.
    • To advance knowledge of quantitative analysis of molecular spectra.
    • To make students familiar with the basic ideas of photochemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of the laws of thermodynamics and how they can be applied to thermochemical calculations

    (LO2) Show ability to employ the methods of chemical kinetics to describe and analyse the time-dependence of chemical processes.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics, including operators and wavefunctions, and their application to simple systems.

    (LO4) Show an understanding of different types of molecular energy levels, the forms of spectroscopy which involve transitions between them, and how molecular quantities can be extracted from the spectra.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S3) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts

    (S4) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S5) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

  • Preparative Chemistry: Synthesis and Characterisation (CHEM245)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to present a unified approach to the synthesis and characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will build on techniques introduced in the first year laboratory courses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will complete a number of different experiments and synthetic techniques across synthetic, organic and inorganic chemistry.

    (LO2) Students will appreciate how spectroscopic techniques can be used in the characterisation of organic and inorganic compounds and will be able to use analytical and spectroscopic methods to characterise their synthesised compounds.

    (LO3) Students will make use of scientific databases during some assignments and an electronic report.

    (LO4) Students will assess the risks involved in chemical lab work and handle chemical materials in a safe manner.

    (LO5) Students should be able to organise and plan their time effectively

    (LO6) Students will experience working collaboratively with others in multiple learning environments

    (S1) Organisational skills

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Teamwork

Year Two Optional Modules

  • An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry (CHEM248)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental principles that underpin modern medicinal chemistry, including an introduction to targets for drug action, methods of administration, qualitative and quantitative SAR, computer aided molecular design, solid phase chemistry /combinatorial chemistry. The course will also introduce approaches to the design of high quality hits using parameters such as Ligand Efficiency, Lipophilic Ligand Efficiency, Property Forecast Indexing and will provide some introductory carbohydrate chemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of this module students are expected to have acquired an understanding of
    * the principle bonding interactions in drug receptor interactions.
    * The basic concepts of structure activity relationships (SAR) and quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR)
    * the principles behind computer aided molecular design and 3-D QSAR
    * Peptide synthesis, protecting groups and combinatorial chemistry
    * optimal properties of small molecule leads
    * basic carbohydrate chemistry
    and will be able to use these concepts and principles to solve simple problems in medicinal chemistry.

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive abilities and skills, ie abilities and skills relating to intellectual tasks, including problem-solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement. In particular, they will gain the ability to adapt and apply methodology to the solution of unfamiliar problems.

    (S2) Communication skills through online Teams Meetings

    (S3) Organisational skills

  • Applied Analytical Chemistry (CHEM286)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide students with an understanding of the applications of various analytical techniques and their role in modern research. This module will demonstrate the fundamental theoretical principles of selected instrumental analytical techniques (NMR spectroscopy, mass-spectrometry, ICP-OE(MS) spectroscopy, separation and hyphenated techniques) in the context of their roles in industrial and academic research, to include chemical and pharmaceutical analysis.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To be able to recognise the current trends in the application of the instrumental analytical methods

    (LO2) Demonstrate awareness of the theoretical concepts of NMR spectroscopy, Mass-Spectrometry, Chromatography, hyphenated techniques GC/HPLC-MS, and ICP-based methods

    (LO3) To be able to choose an appropriate technique in order to evaluate the structure, properties and potential applications of materials, or a multi-technique approach to find the solution of a selected experimental problem

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive ability and skills, relating to intellectual tasks, including problem solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement.

    (S2) Students will improve their confidence in scientific communication and develop presentation skills of analytical data

  • Chem284 - Chemistry for Sustainable Technologies (CHEM284)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    • To explain the concepts and terminology of sustainability and sustainable development.
    • To highlight the role of science and technology in working towards sustainable development.
    • To illustrate the central role of metrics in the critical and comparative assessment of the efficiency and impact of chemical technologies.
    • To exemplify new approaches to chemistry in the development of more sustainable chemical technologies.
    • To provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the principles of Green Chemistry and a fundamental knowledge in new technologies for the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the basic terminology of sustainable development and 'green' chemistry

    (LO2) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the non-rigorous nature of this terminology and its consequences

    (LO3) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of 'green' chemistry

    (LO4) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the importance of catalysis in developing sustainable chemical technologies and the challenges associated with their implementation

    (LO5) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the basics of new technologies in the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

    (S1) Organisational skills

  • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

    Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;

    How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;

    How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;

    How the atmosphere and ocean vary together in affecting the present and past climate system.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and Understanding

    a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean.

    b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves.

    c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.

    d. Gain an awareness of policies and strategies to move towards achieving net zero carbon on a national stage.

    (LO2) Intellectual Abilities

    a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate systemb.

    b. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.

    (LO3) Subject Based Practical Skills

    a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results.

    b. Understand the use of units and dimensions.

    (LO4) General Transferable Skills

    a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions.

    b. Time management.

    c. Problem solving.

    d. Group work.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Digital fluency : ability to think critically and make balanced judgments, and use digital platforms to collaborate and communicate.

  • Functional Organic Materials (CHEM241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of this module are to:
    • Provide students with an understanding of how synthetic polymers are synthesised and characterised.
    • Enable students to understand the relationship between the structure and properties of organic materials.
    • Develop knowledge on some important characterisation techniques used for organic materials.
    • Give the students an insight into some of the organic materials research ongoing at the University of Liverpool.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to; name common monomers and polymers, describe different synthetic routes to produce polymers and discuss basic characterisation of synthetic polymers.

    (LO2) Students will be able to understand how to characterise organic crystalline and porous materials.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of how functional organic materials are synthesised, and show an understanding of the relationship between the structure and properties of a material.

    (LO4) Students will be able to outline how to design materials for specific applications.

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S3) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S4) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the essentials facts, concepts, principles and theories relating to functional organic materials

    (S5) The ability to recognise and analyse problems and plan strategies for their solution

  • Inorganic Applications of Group Theory (CHEM316)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to demonstrate the underlying importance of symmetry throughout Chemistry, with particular applications to spectroscopic selection rules and bonding.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to: Identify symmetry elements in molecules Assign molecules to their correct point groups Use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to identify symmetry elements in molecules

    (LO2) By the end of the module, students should be able to assign molecules to their correct point groups

    (LO3) By the end of the module, students should be able to use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding

  • Introduction to Statistics (MATH162)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    •To introduce topics in Statistics and to describe and discuss basic statistical methods.
    •To describe the scope of the application of these methods.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To know how to describe statistical data.

    (LO2)  To be able to use the Binomial, Poisson, Exponential and Normal distributions.

    (LO3) To be able to perform simple goodness-of-fit tests.

    (LO4) To be able to use an appropriate statistical software package to present data and to make statistical analysis.

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Communication skills

Programme Year Three

In your final year you will continue to study the three main branches of chemistry, organic, inorganic and physical chemistry, but the emphasis is on the application of chemistry to the modern world. You will also further develop skills to enhance your employability and general chemistry skills, including a module on Further key skills and Molecular modelling.

There are a range of linked activities in the Faculty of Science and Engineering including the Department of Chemistry which aim to improve your cultural learning, as well as academic and/or communication skills; hence, your employability skills. Liverpool students pair up with your XJTLU counterparts to undertake an undergraduate assignment which runs on both sites simultaneously. Therefore, the tasks can then be compared and contrasted.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Further Organic Chemistry (CHEM333)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to extend second year knowledge of synthetic and physical organic chemistry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should have a good understanding of some modern synthetic reactions.

    (LO2) Students should be able to deduce mechanisms on the basis of kinetic and other evidence

    (S1) The ability to recognise the types of reaction taught and apply mechanistic knowledge to predict the outcome of unseen examples

  • Inorganic Materials Chemistry (CHEM313)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to
    • Enhance students' understanding of the fundamental nature of ordered crystalline solids
    • Develop the concept that the structure of materials impact on their properties and applications
    • Provide an introduction to the use of diffraction methods to characterise crystal structures
    • Describe characterisation techniques, for both crystalline and amorphous materials.
    • Outline electronic structure in the solid state.
    • Describe a range of materials manufacturing techniques.
    • Explain the origin of magnetism in the solid state.
    • Outline the practical implications of magnetic materials
    • Describe how we make and study magnetic inorganic solids
    • Highlight current research trends in inorganic magneto chemistry

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and describe the characteristics of the crystalline solid state

    (LO2) Be able to perform simple analyses of powder X-ray diffraction data

    (LO3) Describe the factors affecting the crystal structures formed by ionic compounds

    (LO4) Understand that solid structures directly influences the physical and functional properties of materials, and describe examples

    (LO5) Understand the solid-state electronic structure of inorganic materials

    (LO6) Recognise favourable methods for fabrication, characterisation, and functional property optimisation of specific materials.

    (LO7) Appreciate the real-world relevance of materials design.

    (LO8) Understand the microscopic origins of magnetism, and describe the mechanisms which lead to collective magnetic behaviour

    (LO9) Interpret magnetic data and classify types of inorganic magnetic materials.

    (LO10) Recognise the uses of magnetic materials.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

  • Key Skills for Chemists 3 (CHEM385)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to help Chemistry students develop skills needed for further educational opportunities or employment in a wide range of chemical and non-chemical based sectors.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the employability section of the module, students should be able to demonstrate both a familiarity with, and an understanding of, the importance of transferable skills to the workplace.

    (LO2) By the end of the employability section of the module, students will be able to evaluate work created by their peers through peer reviewing processes and recommend improvements to their peers work.

    (LO3) By the end of the employability section of the module, students will be able to give an oral presentation as part of a team, based around the group mini-project.

    (LO4) By the end of the database section of the module, students should be able to use scientific databases effectively for literature and citation searches.

    (LO5) By the end of the database section of the module, students should be able to find relevant information from online chemical databases regarding chemical reactions and structures.

    (LO6) By the end of the database section of the module, students should be able to apply the database skills in writing a report drawing from scientific literature.

    (S1) Students will develop teamwork and communication skills through group work and peer reviewing

    (S2) Students will develop organisational and lifelong learning skills through portfolio and reflection activities

  • Chem352 - Modern Applications of Physical Chemistry (BSc) (CHEM352)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aims of the three components are:

    • Physical Chemistry of the Condensed State: this will describe the basic physical chemical concepts of processes in the condensed state,including electrochemical potentials, structure of liquids, conductivity of electrolytes, colloids and micelles. This is also aimed at achieving an understanding of the physical chemistry which underlies a number of important technologies, namely batteries and fuel cells, colloids and surfactants.

    • Protein Structure and Protein Folding: to discuss the application of basic physical chemistry concepts for describing protein structure and folding and to show how advanced physical chemistry methods are used for investigating these important aspects of proteins.

    • Atmospheric Photochemistry: The aim of this section is to give the students a broad view of the chemistry of the Earth''s atmosphere. The course will describe the structure of the Earth''s atmosphere, its categorisation into different layers and the physical processes that generate this structure. It will describe the different (photo)chemical processes that occur in different regions of the atmosphere, concentrating in particular on the photochemistry of the stratosphere. The course will conclude with a brief discussion of anthropogenic effects on the Earth's atmosphere.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Ability to describe and discuss the physical chemistry underlying electrochemical cells, batteries and fuel cells, and to perform fundamental thermodynamic calculations on electrochemical cells.

    (LO2) Ability to apply the physicochemical knowledge gained in the course, including the relevant equations, to solve problems relating to the physical chemistry of the condensed state.

    (LO3) Ability to describe the physical chemistry of surfactants and colloids.

    (LO4) Ability to describe the experimental methods that are used to study protein structure and folding, to discuss their analysis, and to discuss and apply (quantitatively) the physical chemistry principles underlying these methods.

    (LO5) Ability to discuss the importance of protein structure and dynamics for understanding biological processes. 

    (LO6) Ability to analyse a Protein Databank entry and to create graphical representations of the structure of a protein highlighting different aspects.

    (LO7) Ability to describe the physical structure of the atmosphere.

    (LO8) Ability to discuss the chemistry occurring in different layers of the atmosphere and to relate this to thermodynamics and to the physical and chemical behaviour of different layers.

    (LO9) Ability to compare the physical chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere to extra-terrestrial atmospheres.

  • Practical Chemistry Yr3 (BSc) (CHEM365)
    Level3
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:99
    Aims

    The general aims of the module are:
    • To give the student practical experience and understanding of advanced practical techniques in three areas from: Organic, Inorganic, Physical and Computational Chemistry.
    • To develop appropriate techniques for each type of experiment
    • To show the use of suitable characterisation and numerical techniques
    • To make valid deductions from acquired data
    • To familiarise the student with the preparation of written reports
    • To introduce structured programming in PYTHON (if computational option chosen)
    • To establish a close link with aspects of the lecture material covered in the Yr2 and Yr3 course

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to
    * Carry out advanced practical techniques in three of the areas of Organic, Inorganic, Physical Chemistry and Computational Chemistry
    * Give a reasoned written exposition of experimental or computational work and achievements
    * Make valid deductions from acquired data
    * Give comprehensible written accounts of experimental work
    * Demonstrate an understanding of shortcomings, experimental errors or weaknesses in data
    * Further develop their time management skills via coordination of the synthetic and analytical components of their experiments
    * Develop strategies for structured programming and user-friendly, re-usable code in PYTHON to solve numerically Physical Chemistry models (if computational option chosen)

    (S1) Organisational Skills

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Teamwork

  • Chem356 - Year 3 Chemistry Project (BSc. Level) (CHEM356)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    In this module, students will be assigned an extended experiment or project according to their own interests and abilities. Depending on the exact nature of the project undertaken, the general aims of the module are:
    • To give the student a taste of research in a contemporary area of chemistry
    • To develop an appropriate experimental technique for the topic undertaken
    • To show the use of appropriate characterisation techniques
    • To illustrate the use of the library and other information resources as research tools or more generic tools for the appropriation of information
    • To familiarise the student with the preparation of written reports
    • To teach the skills necessary for the preparation and delivery of a short oral presentation.
    • To enable the student to apply web based design and techniques
    • To interact with outside bodies (e.g. schools) with the aim of applying or disseminating chemical based knowledge and fostering cooperation

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Depending on the precise emphasis of the individually tailored project, by the end of the module, students should be able to:
    * Give a reasoned written exposition of experimental work and achievements;
    * Make valid deductions from acquired data;
    * Be capable of giving comprehensible written and oral accounts of experimental work;
    * Demonstrate an understanding of shortcomings, experimental errors or weaknesses in data;
    * Show that they understand the wider social and/or technological relevance of their work.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Advanced Functional Organic Materials (CHEM342)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims

    The aims of the module are to:
    • To demonstrate the relationship between structure and properties of organic materials
    • To provide students with an understanding of some of the advanced characterisation techniques used for organic materials.
    • To outline how computation can be used to guide synthesis of functional organic materials.
    • To examine some examples of cutting-edge research organic materials research underway at the Department of Chemistry

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will obtain an understanding of how functional organic materials are synthesised and structure/property relationships.

    (LO2) Students will understand how to select appropriate characterisation techniques for organic materials.

    (LO3) Students will be able to explain how computation can be used to accelerate the development of functional organic materials.

    (LO4) Students will be able outline how to design materials for specific applications.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Commercial awareness

    (S3) Teamwork

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S6) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Biological Energy Conversion Processes (CHEM382)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    • To discuss how fundamental energy conversion in nature occurs by storage of energy in the form of concentration gradients across membranes.
    • To introduce chemically pathways for the photosynthesis, respiration, ATP synthesis, the Calvin cycle, the citrate cycle, fermentation
    • To show the mechanisms behind active transport, nerve signalling, the K/Na pump, muscle contraction and molecular motors.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to show a comprehension of energy conversion processes found in nature

    (LO2) Students will be able to describe the important points relating to chemical processes in photosynthesis respiration, ATP synthesis, the Calvin cycle, the citrate cycle and fermentation

    (LO3) Student will be able to describe the significance of concentration gradients across membranes in biological systems.

    (LO4) Students will be able to discuss the mechanisms behind active transport, nerve signalling, the K/Na pump, muscle contraction and molecular motors

  • Chem358 Chemistry At Surfaces (CHEM358)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To introduce the basics of surface structure description
    To illustrate the experimental techniques used in surface science
    To describe the different chemical bonding at surfaces
    To describe surface dynamics and reactivity

    Learning Outcomes

    (BH2) Be able to make atomistic models of the low index surfaces of common materials

    (L6-2) Be able to make atomistic models of the low index surfaces of common materials

    (LO1) Demonstrate understanding of the different processes occurring at surfaces

    (LO2) Be able to describe the structure of surfaces and how this relates to the techniques used to determine this

    (LO3) Show understanding of the electronic structure of surfaces and how this influences surface chemistry

    (LO4) Apply knowledge of surface science techniques to nanotechnology and heterogeneous catalysis

    (LO5) Be able to discuss how surface electronic structure relates to and differs from bulk electronic structure

    (LO6) Show understanding of the processes involved in adsorption and desorption of atoms and molecules

    (LO7) Be able to discuss the kinetics of surface processes

    (LO8) Demonstrate knowledge of factors affecting surface reactivity and the importance for heterogeneous catalysis

  • Further Analytical Chemistry (CHEM386)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    Main goal: to provide the students with a knowledge of the principles of structural elucidation and application of various spectroscopic and spectrometric analytical techniques for identification and structural characterization of small molecules.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Apply the principles of structural elucidation for identification and characterization of organic compounds

    (LO2) Demonstrate awareness of the theoretical concepts and application of NMR spectroscopy, mass-spectrometry (MS), chromatography (GC/HPLC), and hyphenated techniques GC/HPLC-MS in the context of structural elucidation in synthetic chemistry and catalysis

    (LO3) Devise an appropriate method or a multi-technique approach in order to establish the structure of organic compounds and/or confirm their authenticity

    (LO4) Improve their confidence in scientific communication and presentation of data to subsequently enhance their employability skills

    (S1) Students will develop their chemistry-related cognitive ability and skills, relating to intellectual tasks, including problem solving as required by the Chemistry subject benchmark statement

    (S2) Students will improve their confidence in scientific communication and develop presentation skills of analytical data

  • Chemistry Research Internship (CHEM309)
    Level3
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module is designed to:
    1. Provide students with an insight into the process of scientific research and debate in a setting different from the University of Liverpool;
    2. Expose students to new research and cultural environments;
    3. Develop the confidence to work independently and in a team, to effectively and efficiently attain a scientific goal;
    4. Develop students’ ability to communicate scientific concepts and findings in a variety of formats;
    Develop students'' employability skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) To maintain accurate records of experiments, and reliable and comprehensive account of any methodologies used

    (LO2) To prepare and deliver oral presentations to high scientific and professional standards that describes the experiences during the internship, the research objectives and the rationale behind the project design.

    (LO3) To write a report on the research priorities, the internal and external drivers of the research strategy and the potential impact of the research on the local and wider community.

    (LO4) To analyse and critically evaluate data, information and observations and to draw valid conclusions

    (S1) Research Skills

    (S2) Organisational skills

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Chem284 - Chemistry for Sustainable Technologies (CHEM284)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    • To explain the concepts and terminology of sustainability and sustainable development.
    • To highlight the role of science and technology in working towards sustainable development.
    • To illustrate the central role of metrics in the critical and comparative assessment of the efficiency and impact of chemical technologies.
    • To exemplify new approaches to chemistry in the development of more sustainable chemical technologies.
    • To provide the student with a fundamental understanding of the principles of Green Chemistry and a fundamental knowledge in new technologies for the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the basic terminology of sustainable development and 'green' chemistry

    (LO2) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the non-rigorous nature of this terminology and its consequences

    (LO3) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of 'green' chemistry

    (LO4) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the importance of catalysis in developing sustainable chemical technologies and the challenges associated with their implementation

    (LO5) Students should be able to demonstrate understanding of the basics of new technologies in the generation of renewable energy and chemicals.

    (S1) Organisational skills

  • Heterocyclic Chemistry and Drug Synthesis (CHEM338)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    The aim of the module is to present the synthesis and reactivity of the most important classes of heterocyclic compounds and to present case studies drawn from major drug classes.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students will have achieved a solid foundation in Organic Chemistry. In particular, they will be expected to be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of
    * The structural features and reactivity of heterocyclic compounds, including stereochemistry.
    * Some of the major synthetic pathways in heterocyclic chemistry, involving carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond formation, functional group interconversions and ring substitution.
    * Awareness of the importance of heterocycles as key components in major drug classes and combinatorial libraries.
    In addition, they will be able to give examples of their use in modern synthetic methodology and have an awareness of the importance of three-dimensional structure in Organic Chemistry.

  • Inorganic Applications of Group Theory (CHEM316)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to demonstrate the underlying importance of symmetry throughout Chemistry, with particular applications to spectroscopic selection rules and bonding.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to: Identify symmetry elements in molecules Assign molecules to their correct point groups Use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding

    (LO1) By the end of the module, students should be able to identify symmetry elements in molecules

    (LO2) By the end of the module, students should be able to assign molecules to their correct point groups

    (LO3) By the end of the module, students should be able to use character tables to solve a variety of problems in spectroscopy and bonding

  • Introduction to Chemical Engineering for Chemists (CHEM396)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    Chemical engineering is a branch of engineering that typically deals with the large-scale manufacturing processes for converting raw materials into useful products. The main topics and even the language of chemical engineering are entirely foreign to most chemists. The main aim of this module is to give chemistry students an insight into the world of chemical engineering and to develop an understanding of the main topics of chemical engineering in a practical manner. This module will enable chemistry students to study and to understand interdisciplinary topics at the interface between chemistry and chemical engineering, and it will enable them to engage successfully in dialogue with chemical engineers about chemical problems. The students will also learn extensions of concepts that are familiar to them, typically from thermodynamics and kinetics, but from a very different angle. They will learn about the types of data needed by engineers and why such data are required. This module will certainly help the employability prospects of chemistry students who intend to work in industry after graduation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) By the end of the module students should be able to demonstrate a clear understanding of:
    ·         Mass and energy balances as fundamental operations in a process analysis procedure
    ·         Detailed process flowsheets
    ·         Mass, heat and momentum transfer
    ·         Chemical reaction kinetics and chemical reactor design
    ·         Fluid mechanics and measurement of flow rates
    ·         The calculation of design parameters, such as heat and mass transfer coefficients
    ·         Process control and project economics
    ·         Characteristics of separation processes
    ·         pumps and heat exchangers
    ·         Hazard studies and risk assessments

    (S1) The students will gain the skills required to apply their knowledge to process information, solve problems and evaluate outcomes related to reaction engineering, transport processes and separation process.