Avionic Systems BEng (Hons)

Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: H430
  • Year of entry: 2020
  • Typical offer: A-level : AAB / IB : 35 / BTEC : D*D*D*
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Module details

Programme Year One

For the optional ‘with Pilot Studies’ time is factored into the timetable to enable you to acquire the flying time. If you are not sure if you wish to take a BEng (Hons) or an MEng (Hons) degree then we advise that you apply for the MEng and make a final decision at the end of Year Two.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Digital & Integrated Electronics Design (ELEC143)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting65:35
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with knowledge of: number systems such as binary, hexadecimal and BCD, laws of Boolean Algebra, basic design methods for combinational and sequential logic circuits, operation of various silicon electronic devices, to provide students with the opportunity to understand the basic principles of silicon microelectronics design, introduce the subject in the frame of reference of basic design and problem solving, to develop practical skills in the handling and measurement of components and to increase the confidence of the student in undertaking material with a strong analytical and engineering content.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understanding of number systems such as binary, hexadecimal and BCD

    (LO2) Knowledge of the laws of Boolean Algebra

    (LO3) Knowledge of basic design methods for combinational and sequential logic circuits

    (LO4) Understanding of the application of the physical laws of semiconductor to practicle silicon electronic devices such as diodes and transistors

    (LO5) Familiarity of the common design rules for development of layouts for the silicon devices and simple circuits

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: independent learning; problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline -specific practical skills: designing and debugging digital circuits; the handling and measurement of components.

    (S3) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of the above topics to: design combination logic circuits with up to 4 inputs; analyse and to design simple sequential logic circuits; an ability to design a simple MOS circuit including tolerance and feature sizes.

    (S4) After successful completion of the module, the student should have: a knowledge of basic design methods for combinational and sequential logic circuits; an understanding of number systems such as binary, hexadecimal, BCD; a knowledge of the laws of Boolean algebra; an understanding of how the physical laws of semiconduction apply to practical diodes and transistors; an appreciation of why certain materials are used in devices; a familiarity with common designs of devices, and simple MOS circuits.

  • Electrical Circuits and Systems (ELEC142)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To become familiar with a range of circuit analytical techniques.

    To be able to apply the most appropriate technique for a given circuit.

    To understand and be able to analyse transient phenomena in circuits containing reactive elements.

    To understand the basic principles of operational amplifiers and analyse circuits containing them.

    To introduce students to AC circuits.

    To provide a method for AC circuit analysis for fixed frequency supplies.

    To extend the AC circuit analysis for variable frequency circuits (ie simple filters).

    To extend the analysis from passive frequency dependent circuits to active circuits.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand Ohms Law and other fundamental principals

    (LO2) Understand how circuits can be simplified using resistor combinations

    (LO3) Understand the difference between real and ideal components

    (LO4) Understand how to apply advanced circuit analysis techniques  (Nodal Analysis, Superposition, thevenin and Norton theorems) to  solve simple DC and AC circuit problems.

    (S1) On successful completion of a module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning, problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) On successful completion of a module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline-specific practical skills: Use of CAE tools for designing and simulating analogue systems, to determine the frequency response of simple active filter circuits, to analyse and present results, to provide interpretation of those results.

    (S3) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate: Competence in solving d.c. circuit problems using a number of techniques, ability to recognise the most appropriate solution technique for solving any given problem, competence in solving simple transient circuit problems, an appreciation of the difficulties associated with solving transient problems involving more than one reactive component, convert from time to phasor domain quantities and back to the time domain, analyse simple ac circuits with phasor to calculate current, voltage and impedance, calculate RMS and average quantities, calculate the conditions for maximum power transfer in ac circuit.

    (S4) On successful completion of the module the student is expected to have: An understanding of the basic laws of electrical circuit theory and how they are applied, an understanding of operational amplifier systems, understanding of the transformation voltages and currents from the time domain in to the phasor domain, knowledge of the concept of phasors and the approach to solving ac circuits, knowledge of transfer function for simple filter circuits, understanding an ideal operational amplifier and simple active circuits, knowledge of bode plots and their meaning.

  • Electromagnetism & Electromechanics (ELEC120)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting85:15
    Aims

    Upon completion of this module students will understand the basic elements of electrostatics and electromagnetics. Students will be able to demonstrate the importance of these core topics in engineering applications and complete simple designs of their own.

    The course covers electrostatics, current and permanent electromagnetism. In particular, it is the first time that year one students meet design as distinct from problem based activity. This part of the course demands innovation and also demands that the student has approach as near as possible to a specification which may not, of itself, be possible.

    The second part of the module covers electromechanics. The aims of this section will provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the principles and construction of DC and AC machines, transformers and linear actuators.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Basic understanding of charge and electric field strength.

    (LO2) Knowledge of Gauss's Law and its engineering applications.

    (LO3) Basic understanding of the generation of electric currents. 

    (LO4) Knowledge of engineering applications of the magnetic effects of currents.

    (LO5) Understanding the fundamentals of current flow into inductors and capacitors.

    (LO6) An understanding of how the physical laws of electromagnetism and mechanics apply to practical motors, transformers and actuators.

    (LO7) An understanding of the properties of materials best suited for use in electromechanical devices.

    (LO8) An introductory knowledge of the behaviour of common electrical devices, such as series and shunt dc motors, alternators, solenoids and transformers

    (S1) Intellectual Abilities: Solve electric field problems (including the application of Gauss's Law to find capacitance); Determine the magnetic effects of electrical currents in circuits (including the application of Ampere's Law to current carrying wires); Determine the performance of AC and DC motors, transformers and simple electro-mechanical actuators.

    (S2) Practical Skills: Use of specific instrumentation; Use of spreadsheets in design applications; An ability to analyse a simple electromechanical system in order to predict its characteristics; An ability to prepare an initial design for an electromechanical device from a specification; An ability to take simple electro-mechanical tests on an electrical machine to evaluate its performance; Ability to perform laboratory work safely and effectively.

    (S3) General Transferable Skills; Independent learning and time management skills; Problem solving and design skills.

  • Electronic Circuits (ELEC104)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To introduce students to fundamental electronic devices (diodes and transistors).
    To show how diodes and transistors are used in amplifier and switching circuits.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to show knowledge and understanding of the behaviour, important properties and applications of diodes and transistors.

    (LO2) Students will have the ability to understand and apply equivalent circuit representations of diodes and transistors.

    (LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate understanding of circuit biasing, the role of decoupling capacitors and the performance of some commonly used configurations and their practical significance.

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key transferable skills: independent learning; circuit analysis; problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) After successful completion of the module, the student should have the following practical skills: an ability to determine device properties from characteristics; an ability to calculate the output voltage and regulation of simple rectifier and stabiliser circuits; an ability to perform simple analysis of circuits containing bipolar and MOS transistors; an ability to construct and test simple transistor circuits.

    (S3) On successful completion of the module, the student should have the following intellectual abilities: ability to analyse simple transistor circuit; ability to determine components to meet a specification; ability to design an AC common emitter amplifier

    (S4) On successful completion of the module, the student should have: an understanding of: the behaviour, important properties and applications of diodes and transistors; an understanding of: equivalent circuit representations of diodes and transistors; an understanding of circuit biasing, the role of decoupling capacitors and the performance of some commonly used circuit configurations and their practical significance.

  • Experimental Skills (ELEC172)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module covers the fundamental concepts and techniques necessary to use industrial/commercial windows-based software applications. It also attempts to create new knowledge and understanding of electrical engineering principles. On completion of the module, a student is expected to know and understand: the opportunities presented in MATLAB for solving complex mathematical problems; how to structure a scientific report or presentation; how to connect basic measuring equipment to electronic circuits; the main sustainability practical and legal issues to come into force in the near future; data interfacing and data analysis; error analysis, systematic and random errors.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Have enhanced and harmonised IT skills with relation to: university computer network; technical report writing; data analysis; engineering spreadsheet analysis.

    (LO2) Be creative in design, be able to evaluate results and synthesise knowledge.

    (LO3) Know how to complete individual work and be a valuable team member.

    (LO4) Recognise the basic building blocks of electrical circuits.

    (LO5) Know how to use basic measuring equipment.

    (LO6) Correlate theory in textbooks with its practical application.

    (LO7) To provide an appreciation of electrical engineering's responsibilities in the context of sustainable development.

    (LO8) To solve problems by programming and plotting mathematical expressions in MATLAB.

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: troubleshooting; independent learning; problem solving and design skills; practical application (engineering) of basic knowledge; be a reliable group member and keep updated portfolio.

    (S2) In order to realise the module aims, the student should develop the following skills: use of a soldering kit to assemble a functional device on an electrical board according to a circuit diagram; measure resistance, current and voltage in an electrical circuit; assemble, programme and test a microcontroller-based circuit; design and test an electrical circuit using PC software; learn which are the main distributors of electronic components and know the process for ordering items; be able to apply the taught methodology to identify the key sustainable development impacts of a product or process and determine areas for design improvements.

  • Introduction to Programming in C (ELEC129)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Despite the popularity of newer languages such as C++ and Java the C language remains a core skill in the software business ranking in the top ten desired skills. C is one of the most popular languages for programming embedded systems that are found in automobiles, cameras, DVD players and many other modern appliances. This module aims to enable students to: Learn and use the C programming language Use the C language to solve real engineering problems Acquire fundamental software development skills covering program design, coding and testing

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of the C programming language

    (LO2) Knowledge of general programming concepts

    (LO3) Knowledge of the role and functions of the hardware and software components of a computer

    (LO4) Understanding of the software development process

    (S1) General transferable skills: On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate enhancement of the following key transferable skills: Independent learning; Problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) Practical skills: On successful completion of the module, the students are expected to: Be able to use the C++ compiler on the University computer networks to code, compile and run programs written in C; Be able to design modular programs following the top-down function-oriented approach; Be able to code an algorithm using the (ANSI) C language.

    (S3) Intellectual abilities: On successful completion of the module, the students should demonstrate ability in applying the knowledge accumulated during lectures and laboratory classes to: Design, code, test and document computer programs that meet the requirements supplied in a specification; Analyse and understand existing code written in C; Modify and enhance existing programs written in C; Determine and correct the sources of errors that occur during compilation, run-time errors and logical (design) errors.

  • Mathematics I for Electrical Engineers (MATH191)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims

    •To bring students from varying backgrounds up to a common level in preparation for further modules in mathematics.

    •To cover in detail the basic techniques of differential calculus, and provide an introduction to the theories of integral calculus, vectors, complex numbers and series

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the notion of limits on an intuitive level

    (LO2) Differentiate functions using the product, quotient and chain rules

    (LO3) Understand various applications of the theory of differentiation, including Maclaurin series and Taylor series

    (LO4) Carry out simple calculations involving integration, vectors, complex numbers, and series

  • Mathematics II for Electrical Engineers (MATH192)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    1. To provide a detailed introduction to techniques (change of variable, integration by parts and partial fractions) for and applications of one-dimensional integrals.

    2. To introduce partial derivatives of functions of two variables and their applications, e.g., for linear approximations.

    3. To comprehensively introduce matrices, determinants and several techniques for solving systems of linear equations; to introduce eigenvalues and eigenvectors for 2x2 matrices.

    4. To briefly revise or introduce the scalar and cross products of vectors and their basic applications.

    5.To give a comprehensive introduction to first-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs), including systems of two ODEs with constant coefficients, and second-order ODEs with constant coefficients.

    6.To introduce, time permitting, the Fourier expansion of periodic functions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learning outcomes  After completing the module students should be able to  *  evaluate a range of one-dimensional integrals using standard techniques  *  calculate partial derivatives and find the tangent plane to a surface  *  invert 3x3 matrices and solve systems of linear equations   *  solve basic (systems of) ODEs relevant to electrical engineering

Year One Optional Modules

  • Introduction to Aerospace Engineering (AERO110)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of fundamental topics that an aerospace engineer must at least be aware of to be able to function in such a multi-disciplinary industry.
    The module provides a basic coverage of material from aerodynamic, performance and stability and control disciplines that are built upon in subsequent years of study.
    To introduce students to the power of computer-based computation methods using simple mathematical examples.
    To enthuse students in their chosen degree programme.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will be able to evaluate solutions to aerospace-engineering related problems.

    (LO2) Students will be able to utilise simple computational software to develop tools that will be useful throughout their career.

    (LO3) Describe, in relatively simple terms, key concepts that relate to the field of aerospace engineering.

    (S1) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

    (S2) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S4) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility

  • Pilot Studies 1 (AERO131)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To provide basic knowledge of the following topics that relate to the systems and operation of a light aircraft: Aircraft technical, Navigation and Radio Aids, Meteorology, Flight Performance and Planning, Radio Communications and Human Performance. To engage students in a PPL/NPPL flight training programme aiming to expose them to the procedures required for flying and help them develop the required flying skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module the student will have knowledge of meteorological conditions and be able to interpretate of weather information relating to flight.

    (LO2) On successful completion of this module the students will have gained knowledge of the basic principles of systems found on a typical light aircraft, including communication systems and radio navigation aids.

    (LO3) To be able to assess the implications of Human Factors on aviation safety.

    (S1) Practical planning abilities, taking into account a variety of factors that may not be fully pre-determinable.

    (S2) Develop the required skill to fly a light aircraft and complete the NPPL/PPL exercises required for a student to be ready for his/her first solo flight

    (S3) Independent learning

Programme Year Two

If you are not sure whether you wish to take a BEng (Hons) or an MEng (Hons) degree then we advise that you apply for the MEng and make a final decision at the end of Year Two.

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Avionics and Communications Systems (AERO250)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of basic communication systems, avionic systems, including radar, navigation and aircraft vision systems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Be able to demonstrate their analytical skills to the design of simple avionic systems, indluding radio communications, radars and elementary EMC engineering

    (LO2) Be able to demonstrate the use of the Friis and Radar Equations, as well as the concepts of noise and interference

    (LO3) Be able to demonstrate their familiarity with, and ability to manipulate, the decibel notation that is used extensively in radar and radio systems

    (LO4) Be able to demonstrate a familiarity with basic intertial and GPS navigation systems

    (LO5) Be able to demonstrate an understanding of aircraft vision systems

    (S1) Independent learning

  • Instrumentation & Control (ELEC207)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting95:5
    Aims

    Part A: To provide the student with the ability to select a suitable transducer and associated system for a given measurement application and to consider possible alternative solutions. To understand the principles of transducer operation and factors contributing to the measurement error.

    Part B: To provide the student with a thorough understanding of the principles of a closed loop control system via system modelling, performance analysis and controller design and synthesis. To provide a framework, within which students can evaluate, develop and implement the design methodologies of classical control, with applications to Electrical, Mechanical and Mechatronics systems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the physical basis of some common electrical transducers A general appreciation of basic transducer specifications and their interpretation An understanding of the system requirements for a typical measurement system An appreciation of some common factors that can affect the performance of a measurement system.

    (LO2) An understanding of the behavior of linear systems, the derivation of mathematical models, and transfer function representation A familiarity with the problem of stability, and the ability to apply standard tests for stability An appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages of closed-loop feedback with regard to system response speed, sensitivity to parameters and disturbances, accuracy and stability An appreciation of graphical techniques for representing control system characteristics A familiarity with common types of system controller, and an ability to select the most appropriate controller for a given problem An appreciation of how complete control schemes are implemented in hardware and software, and the problems of system integration.

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and instrumentation system design skills

    (S2) On successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonsrate practical experimental skills in data collection, analysis and interpretation and have an ability to calculate suitable controller settings for a given problem.

    (S3) Part-A: After succesful completion of the module, the student should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the factors that need to be considered in the design of a typical measurement system, including the choice of transducer, associated signal conditioning and transmission path requirements.On successful completion of the module, the student is expected to have: An understanding of the physical basis of some common electrical transducers A general appreciation of basic transducer specifications and their interpretation An understanding of the system requirements for a typical measurement system An appreciation of some common factors that can affect the performance of a measurement system. An understanding of the behavior of linear systems, the derivation of mathematical models, and transfer function representation A familiarity with the problem of stability, and the ability to apply standard tests for stability An appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages of closed-loop feedback with regard to system response speed, sensitivity to parameters and disturbances, accuracy and stability An appreciation of graphical techniques for representing control system characteristics A familiarity with common types of system controller, and an ability to select the most appropriate controller for a given problem An appreciation of how complete control schemes are implemented in hardware and software, and the problems of system integration.

    (S4) Part-B:Students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of the module topics to: An understanding of the behavior of linear systems, the derivation of mathematical models, and transfer function representation A familiarity with the problem of stability, and the ability to apply standard tests for stability An appreciation of the advantages and disadvantages of closed-loop feedback with regard to system response speed, sensitivity to parameters and disturbances, accuracy and stability An appreciation of graphical techniques for representing control system characteristics A familiarity with common types of system controller, and an ability to select the most appropriate controller for a given problem An appreciation of how complete control schemes are implemented in hardware and software, and the problems of system integration.

  • Electrical Circuits & Power Systems (ELEC209)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims

    This modules aims to equip students with tools to analyse inter-related circuits. To provide students with an introduction to the components and composition of an electric power system.  To consider the different primary energy sources and the way in which power is delivered to the customers.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understanding of magnetically coupled circuits and the concept of mutual inductance.

    (LO2) Knowledge and understanding of three-phase networks and the concept of a balanced and unbalanced network.

    (LO3) Knowledge and understanding of response of simple networks to transient.

    (LO4) Knowledge and understanding of the interconnection of two port networks including maximum power transfer, insertion loss and impedance matching.

    (LO5) Knowledge and understanding of power, power balance, power systems.

    (LO6) Knowledge and understanding of components of a power system.

    (LO7) Knowledge and understanding of the per-unit systems.

    (LO8) Knowledge and understanding of different energy sources.

    (LO9) Knowledge and understanding of induction generators.

    (LO10) Knowledge and understanding of synchronous generators.

    (LO11) Knowledge and understanding of unbalanced powers systems operation.

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning. Problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) Students on completion of the module should be able to: perform measurements on simple circuits containing magnetic circuits; analyse and present results; provide an interpretation of those results; undertake calculations relevant to the steady state operation of a power system; be confident in the use of the per-unit system, both in the representation of circuit quantities and in calculations.

    (S3) After completion of the module, the students should be able to demonstate ability in applying knowledge of the module topics to: Analyse simple magnetic circuits and calculated induced voltages and currents. Analyse simple magnetic coupled circuits. Understand the reason for 3 phase circuits and to be able to calculate currents and voltages. Analyse and calculate the transient response of first and second order filter circuits. Understand the concept of two port networks. Use complex arithmetic in the analysis of equivalent circuits for transformers and alternators. Analyse 3-phase systems using per unit system and single line equivalent circuit. Appreciate the roles of different energy sources in an integrated system. Have a grounding that will allow him or her to follow the public debate on energy policy over the next decade.

    (S4) After completion of the module, the student should have knowledge and understanding of: Magnetically coupled circuits and the concept of mutual inductance; three phase networks and the concept of a balanced and unbalanced network; response of simple networks to transient; the interconnection of two port networks including maximum power transfer, insertion loss and impedance matching; the role of computer aided analysis and matrix analysis.

    The student should: Know why power systems are necessary and how they are organised in terms of the separation of functions and the basic commercial arrangements; understand that there has to be a continuous balance between generation, load and losses for complex power, and know what would happen if there were to be an imbalance; have an appreciation of the connection between real power flow and phase difference across a line and also of reactive power flow and voltage magnitude difference; understand the application of machine and transformer equivalent circuits to power system analysis and how the per unit system simplifies calculations involving transformers; an appreciation of why synchronous machines are used in thermal and nuclear power stations whilst IM's may be used in wind power generation; an understanding of how alternative energy sources have developed over recent years; knowledge of wind, wave and solar energy sources, their energy density and its effect on land usage and an introduction to the theory of conversion from original form to electrical energy; knowledge of the way in which transmission line may be represented in circuit terms and the limitations of each form of circuit; knowledge of the interconnected nature of a transmission system, and by comparison of the radial nature of a distribution system; knowledge of the voltage levels used within systems and of the statutory requirements to maintain voltage and frequency; an ability to use the equivalent circuits of the different pieces of equipment to derive a circuit description of the power system and an ability to undertake simple balance fault calculations.

  • Digital Electronics & Microprocessor Systems (ELEC211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    To provide students with the ability to: Design digital systems using the Algorithmic State Machine (ASM) methodology. Understand the features of Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) and use them in their designs. Interface memory and other peripherals to microprocessor systems. Provide knowledge of microprocessor systems with a good understanding of how basic microprocessors work. Understand basic assembly language programmes. Know the different data formats such as ASCII 2's complement and floating point format and more advanced microprocessor concepts such as pipelines and Harvard architecture.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Demonstrate a knowledge of digital electronics including combinational and sequential logic, algorithmic state machine (ASM) design techniques, Quine-McCluskey method and Karnuagh map-entered variables.

    (LO2) Demonstrate an ability to design digital electronics using FPGA and a hardware description language.

    (LO3) Demonstrate a knowledge of microprocessor concepts including architecture, assembly language, standard formats for negative and floating point numbers

    (LO4) Demonstrate a knowledge of more advanced microprocessor concepts including von Neuman/ Harvard architectures, pipelining and memory cache.

    (LO5) Demonstrate an ability to understand assembly language code and use assembly language  to write simple computer programmes on a basic microprocessor.

    (S1) Information technology (application of) adopting, adapting and using digital devices, applications and services

    (S2) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Signals and Systems (ELEC270)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To introduce the student to the fundamentals of the analysis of continuous- and discrete-time signals and systems. To equip the student with the mathematical tools that would allow them to design and/or analyse a linear time-invariant system, e.g. a filter. To present the concepts involved with signals and systems. Namely: Signal Classification, Representation and Analysis Fourier Series Fourier Transform Laplace Transform Linear Time-invariant (LTI) Systems and Filters Discrete-time Fourier Series Discrete-time Fourier Transform z-Transform

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the use of Fourier Series to represent periodic continuous-time signals.

    (LO2) An understanding of the use of the Fourier Transform to represent finite energy signals.

    (LO3) An understanding of the Laplace Transform, its properties and its use in circuit and system analysis.

    (LO4) An understanding of the use of Discrete-time Fourier Series to represent periodic discrete-time signals.

    (LO5) An understanding of the use of the Discrete-time Fourier Transform.

    (LO6) An understanding of the z-Transform, its properties and its use for discrete-time signals and systems.

    (LO7) An understanding of the relationship between time and frequency domains.

    (LO8) An understanding of Linear Time Invariant Systems, and filters, both in the continuous- and discrete-time domains.

    (LO9) An appreciation of the relationship between the system function and the frequency response.

    (LO10) The ability to deal with real physcial signals and analyse, synthesise and otherwise manipulate them using available laboratory equipment.

    (LO11) An appreciation of the relationship between the syst em function and the frequency response. 

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and design skills

    (S2) After completion of the module, the student should have: the ability to analyse continuous- and discrete-time signals and to design and analyse simple linear continuous and discrete systems

  • Electronic Circuits and Systems (ELEC271)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To understand how electronic circuits are designed and undertake some simple design exercises . To understand how electronic devices can be represented by simple, linear equivalent circuits. To show how complex circuits can be sub-divided into building blocks and these blocks in turn represented by linear equivalent circuits which can be analysed using standard circuit techniques. To understand the interaction between the building blocks to allow estimation of important systems parameters such as gain, input output resistance etc. To appreciate the importance of negative feedback in improving electronic systems performance and tolerance.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Circuit operation

    (LO2) Circuit design fundamentals

    (LO3) Appreciation of historical perspective and state-of-the-art

    (S1) After successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and design skills

    (S2) After successful completion of the module, students will be able to design, analyse and test electronic amplifier circuits.

    (S3) After successful completion of the module the student should be capable of: comparing physical device operation to engineering models; analysing the design principles of simple building blocks and how they can be are combined to form complex electronic systems with well-controlled functionality and creating these models and undertaking the analysis to facilitate design of amplifiers with specified properties.

    (S4) After successful completion of the module, the student should have: an understanding of small signal transistor amplifier analysis and design; An understanding of the use of current mirrors for biasing and as active loads; An appreciation of the high frequency limitations of transistor amplifiers; An understanding of amplifier types and feedback topologies; An appreciation of the control of gain, bandwidth, distortion, input and output impedances of amplifiers by the use of negative feedback; An understanding of some operational amplifier non-idealities; An appreciation of how the effects of these non-idealities can be controlled in amplifier design; Familiarity with a range of linear and non-linear applications of operational amplifiers.

  • Field Theory and Partial Differential Equations (MATH283)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    •To introduce students to the concepts of scalar and vector fields.

    •To develop techniques for evaluating line, surface and volume integrals.

    •To introduce students to some of the basic methods for solving partial differential equations

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) After completing the module, students should be able to: Evaluate Grad, Div, Curl and Laplacian operators in Cartesian and polar coordinates Evaluate line, double and volume integrals Have a good understanding of the physical meaning of flux and circulation  Be able to solve simple boundary value problems for the wave equation, diffusion equation and Laplace's equation

Year Two Optional Modules

  • Aircraft Performance A (AERO212)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To acquaint students with the fundamentals of the performance of fixed-wing aircraft; to develop from first principles the theory required to formulate and solve representative performance problems; to discuss the limitations of the theory; to introduce students to the basics of aircraft stability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills:

    technical report writing

    analysing and presenting data.

    (LO2) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline-specific practical skills:

    collecting, recording, analysing and presenting lift, drag and moment data using a wind-tunnel.

    collecting, recording, analysing and presenting flight test data.

    mathematical problem formulating and solving skills.

    (LO3) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of the above topics to:

    Deriving and applying formulae relating to fundamental performance parameters.

    Estimating range, endurance, climb and descent performance, take-off and landing lengths, and performance in turning flight, given basic aircraft and atmospheric data.

    Assessing the longitudinal and lateral-directional static stability of an aircraft.

    (LO4) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

    The physical principles that govern the performance of subsonic aircraft.

    The mathematics required for Aircraft Performance analysis.

    The terminology associated with Aircraft Performance.

    The limitations of the performance theory static stability.

  • Pilot Studies 2 (AERO231)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To provide knowledge of navigation, meteorology, aircraft instrumentats and human factors appropriate to commercial operations.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of the influence of human factors in the context of commercial aircraft operation

    (LO2) An understanding of global meteorological conditions relevant to commercial aircraft operations.

    (LO3) Knowledge and understanding of commercial aircraft navigation

    (LO4) Knowledge and understanding of commercial aircraft flight instruments and warning systems

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Lifelong learning skills

  • Pilot Studies 3 (AERO232)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To provide knowledge of Aircraft Performance and Principles of Flight, Radio Navigation systems and Aircraft General Knowledge appropriate to commercial aircraft operations

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An appreciation of Radio Navigation principles

    (LO2) An understanding of commercial aircraft systems

    (LO3) A sound knowledge of the principles of flight

    (LO4) A sound knowledge of aircraft performance

    (S1) Teamwork

    (S2) Communication skills

    (S3) Commercial awareness

  • Electromagnetics (ELEC210)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To further enhance the students knowledge and use of Maxwells equations and their use in practical EM applications.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the differential and integral form of Maxwell's equations and their application in electrical engineering and electronics.

    (LO2) Awareness of some numerical methods for solving static EM field problems.

    (LO3) An understanding of energy transport by EM waves.

    (LO4) After successful completion of the module the student should be able to solve 3 dimensional electromagnetic problems using Maxwell's equations.

    (S1) Independent learning Problem solving and design skills

    (S2) After successful completion of this module the student should be able to measure the basic characteristics of a transmission line.

  • Project, Problem Solving & Industrial Awareness (ELEC222)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of the project is to provide students with practical work which underpins, confirms and gives application focus for academic study, while testing a wide range of skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Qualify and quantify errors in experimental work

    (LO2) Be aware of Engineering ethics and relevant issues-I

    (LO3) Documenting an open-ended problem

    (LO4) Presenting an open-ended problem

    (LO5) Be aware of sustainable design considerations

    (LO6) Be aware of Engineering ethics and relevant issues-II

    (LO7) Summarise a technical presentation

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning and self-motivation; Problem solving and design skills; Written communication (technical reports); Inter-active skills (with supervisors, other students, technicians,etc); Project work plan; Poster and webpage design; Computing and IT skills.

    (S2) On successful completion of the module, the student should have experienced the complete execution of a design or experimental project. This experience will include: familiarity with a typesetting markup language for presentation semantics (LaTeX) for the preparation of academic reports; interpreting a specification, undertaking suitable research and producing a project plan; executing all essential aspects of a project plan or experiment; gaining insight into the problem solving process; writing a technical report describing the project; preparing either a poster display or web pages related to the project; condensing information from a seminar series into an executive summary; writing an executive summary.

    (S3) On successful completion of the project, the student should be able to demonstrate ability in the following: Managing the project in terms of aims and objectives, deliverables and milestones, time and resources; Defining/specifing problem; Research and information-gathering; Planning/designing a laboratory experiment using suitable techniques and procedures with due regard to safety; Assessing and managing risk; Analysing technical problems qualitatively and /or quantitatively; Design a system, component or process based on outline or detailed project spesifications; Awareness of aspects of sustainable design, corporate social responsibility and ethical conduct in professional situations.

    (S4) On successful completion of the project, the student should have experience in open-ended practical work, in preparation for the final year project and an industrial awareness providing a broader view of the electronics industry.

Programme Year Three

You undertake an extended individual project in the area of Avionics.

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Flight Dynamics and Control (AERO317)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to give the students a solid grounding in the theory of Flight Dynamics/Flight Control Systems principles and to equip them to solve related problems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand the basic theory set out in the syllabus

    (LO2) Understand and be able to reproduce derivations of key formulae

    (LO3) Understand the concepts of aircraft stability and dynamic response

    (LO4) Understand and be able to apply the basic principles of feedback control to aircraft flight dynamics

    (LO5) Be able to formulate and to solve representative problems using pen & paper and calculator.

    (LO6) Understand how to solve more challenging analysis and design problems using computer programs and simulation.

  • Avionic Systems Design (AERO350)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    To provide students with the experience of solving a design problem within the scope of a typical avionic system. The module aims to provide the opportunity for students to apply their knowledge and creative skills to design and evaluate a practical design solution to meet a given requirement and to further develop their team-working and presentation skills.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of the technical aspects of avionic system design, particularly of their design project. an appreciation of the relationship between the results of computer based analysis and practical measurements.

    (LO2) On successful completion of the module, students should have developedthe ability to apply technical knowledge and understanding to create a practical engineering design solutionthe ability to use some example computer based design tools and critically assess their value and limitations.the ability to interpret simulation results in order to compare performance against a given requirement.

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students will have enhanced their experience of the following practical skills:i) the use of simulation tools to assist creative engineering designii) analysis, interpretation and presentation skills

    (S2) On successful completion of the module, students should have enhanced their experience of the following transferable skills:i) creativityii) to research a technical topic and gather relevant informationiii) written and oral communicationiv) data evaluationv) team-working, time management and planning

  • Rf Engineering and Applied Electromagnetics (ELEC311)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of high frequency electromagnetics; to present and develop the underlying theory of transmission lines (TX), including lossy TX; to introduce the Smith Chart as an important tool in TX design and analysis; to give an appreciation of the importance of computational electromagnetics its role in industrial applications; to give a clear understanding of impedance matching and related techniques; to introduce the concept of the scattering parameters for 2-port networks and their applications and measurements; to understand radio wave propagation, attenuation and reflection; and to enable students to appreciate the basic understanding of RF filter, antenna and amplifier design.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The essentials of RF engineering and applied EM. The circuit and field concepts and their relevance to RF systems.

    (LO2) The underlying theory and physical concepts behind transmission lines (TX) and the factors governing performance of real TEM transmission lines, and knowledge of various transmission lines in practice.

    (LO3) Reflection coeffiecients, VSWR,and return loss in communication systems

    (LO4) The methods of achieving matched conditions for maximum power transfer.

    (LO5) S- parameters and their measurement and applications.

    (LO6) An appreciation of radio propagation and antennas.

    (LO7) Fundamental knowledge of RF components and devices, such as filters and amplifiers, for modern communicaiton systems.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Lifelong learning skills

  • Antennas (ELEC312)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce fundamental antenna principles and concepts based on the underlying electromagnetic theory.

    To gain a good understanding of antenna theory and design.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The ability and understand the operation and fuctions of antennas

    (LO2) The ability to design basics antennas

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills:Independent learningProblem solving and theoretical design skills

    (S2) On successful completion of the module the student should be able to:-Apply their theoretical knowledge to the design and evaluation of simple antenna systems.

    (S3) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to:Demonstrate their ability to analyse simple antenna systems.

    (S4) After successful completion of the module, the student should be abe to: Demonstrate their familiarity with fundamental antenna concepts such as near and far fields and their distribution, radiation resistance and its calculation, radiation patterns and their relationship to antenna gain as well as the relationship between gain and directivity. Demonstrate the manipulation of Maxwell's equations which underpin these concepts that are fundamental to the module.

  • Electronics for Instrumentation and Communications (ELEC317)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To gain knowledge of a wide range of analogue components and electronics for instrumentation and communications.

    To gain a better understanding of the theory, analysis and design of analogue electronic circuits used in instrumentation and communications systems.

    To learn and use an industrial standard simulation tool (Agilent ADS) for the design of electronic systems.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) After successful completion of the module, the student should have A good understanding of a wide range of analogue components, including filters, amplifiers, oscillators, mixers, and phase locked loops. An understanding of the limitations of these components and how these can be overcome by design or the appropriate choice of device. An understanding of how to design these components. An understanding of computer aided design of electronic systems

    (LO2) After successful completion of the module, the students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of the module topics to: Analyse problems associated with electronic circuits for instrumentation and communication systems Select correct components for electronic system design. Design an electronic system using an industrial standard CAD tool.

    (S1) After successful completion of the module, she student should have: The ability to select the correct components to design an electronic system. Sufficient confidence to be able to analyse the behaviour of complex circuits. The ability to design practical circuits to meet a given specification with aid of the CAD tool.

    (S2) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning. Problem solving and design skills.

  • Image Processing (ELEC319)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce the basic concepts of digital image processing and pattern recognition.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) After successful completion of the module, the student should have: An understanding of main principles of digital image processing, and its relation to pattern recognition in images, object detection,  tracking and machine vision. An appreciation of the areas of applications for various image enhancement techniques.

    (LO2) After successful completion of the module, the student should have: An understanding of the standard methods of image manipulation, representation and information extraction.

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and design skills

    (S2) After successful completion of the module, the student should have: The ability to apply relevant image enhancement techniques to a given problem. The necessary mathematical skills to develop standard image processing algorithms.

  • Engineering Management and Entrepreneurial Skills (ELEC352)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting35:65
    Aims

    To introduce students to some of the tools and constraints associated with managing both small and large projects, and with some simple costing approaches.

    To undertake a virtual project in small groups.

    To encourage students to adopt a project approach to current and future tasks and to learn the language adopted by project oriented employers.

    To instil an entrepreneurial outlook.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Practical project management

    (LO2) Practical risk management

    (LO3) Practical cost management

    (LO4) Formal meeting administration and record taking

    (LO5) Teamwork and communications

    (S1) Business and customer awareness basic understanding of the key drivers for business success – including the importance of innovation and taking calculated risks – and the need to provide customer satisfaction and build customer loyalty.

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Digital Control and Optimisation (ELEC303)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce the students to the fundamentals of applied digital control.
    To familiarise the students with digital control design techniques through realistic control examples and applications.
    To introduce digital P,PI,PID and full state feedback controller design.
    To introduce how to implement a digital control algorithm in software.
    To introduce the basic concept of optimisation.
    To introduce the conventional optimisation techniques.
    To introduce gradient based optimisation methods and their properties.
    To familiarise the student with the application of optimisation methods.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) 1: The student will be able to use Z transforms and state-space modelling to design and implement digital control algorithms.

    (LO2) 2: The student will be able to set-up optimisation problems and utilise conventional and gradient based methods to solve these problems.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identifcation / synthesis

    (S2) Numeracy/computational skills - Reason with numbers/mathematical concepts/problem solving/numerical methods.

    (S3) An understanding of linear systems

    (S4) An ability to develop system models and to use them to design feedback control laws in order to enhance system performance

    (S5) An good understanding of controlling continuous systems via digital controllers

    (S6) A knowledge of typical computer controlled system artitectures

    (S7) An appreciation of the use of optimisation methods for system analysis and modelling

    (S8) An understanding of linear programming, non-linear programming and Dynamic programming can be used to solve system optimisation problems

    (S9) An appreciation of how computer-aided design and simulation tools operate

    (S10) An understanding of how the optimisation methods are applied to industrial and engineering optimisation problems

    (S11) An understanding of optimisation algorithm development

  • Signal Processing & Digital Filtering (ELEC309)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims

    To develop a basic framework for signal processing and to demonstrate some applications.

    To provide students with a good understanding of the types and behaviours of a number of different digital filters.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Appreciation of how to analyse FIR and IIR filters using z-transform.

    (LO2) Appreciation of the effects of quantisation.

    (LO3) Applications in waveform generators and digital audio.

    (LO4) The use of DFT , FFT and linear convolution.

    (LO5) knowledge of the concepts of linear time-invariant circuits and systems.

    (LO6) Knowledge of sampling and filtering methodologies.

    (LO7) Designing FIR digital filters using the window (Fourier series) technique.

    (LO8) Designing IIR digital filters using pole/zero placement, the bilinear transform or other techniques.

    (LO9) Using MATLAB in filter design.

    (S1) On successful completion of this module the student should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and design skills

    (S2) On successful completion of this module the student should be able to: determine the most appropriate sampling and filtering methodologydesign IIR digital filters using pole/zero placement, the bilinear transfor or other techniquesdesign FIR digital filters using the window (Fourier series) techniqueuse MATLAB for filter design

    (S3) On successful completion of this module the student should have:Knowledge about basic signal processing framework and applications.The mathematical knowledge to understand the behaviour of linear time invariant digital systems. They will be able to explain the behaviour of digital filters in terms of mathematical concepts.

    (S4) On successful completion of this module the student should have:Revision of the basic concepts.Appreciation of how to analyse FIR and IIR filters using z-transform.Appreciation of the effects of quantisation.Applications in waveform generators and digital audioIntroduction to DFT, FFT and linear convolution.Further knowledge of the concepts of linear time-invariant circuits and systems, both analogue and discrete time (including digital signal processing systems); Students will know how to apply these concepts to the analysis, design and implementation of various types of analogue, discrete time and digital filters. Knowledge of the z-transform as applied to discrete-time system analysis and design.

  • Photonics and Optical Information Systems (ELEC313)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce students to the fundamental principles of opto/electronic systems for the transfer of information.

    To introduce the duality of light as both wave and ray.

    To show intensity and phase related optical principles.

    To demonstrate optical information transfer through a number of applications.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understanding of electronic to optical and optical to electronic conversion and associated devices.

    (LO2) An understanding of power transfer, modulation transfer function, system transfer function and optical data storage

    (LO3) An understanding of information transfer via optical intensity and phase modulation.

    (LO4) Knowledge and understanding of the duality of light.

    (LO5) An appreciation of how to manipulate light rays and an appreciation of intensity and phase related effects of light.

    (S1) On successful completion of this module, the student should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) On successful completion of this module, the student should be able to: Design simple photonic systems and design simple optical information systems.

    (S3) On successful completion of this module, the student should be able to:
    Undertake calculations on individual components in a photonic system.
    Calculate the modulation and transfer characteristics of simple photonic systems.
    Provide an analysis of the overall system performance.
    Assess the contributions that limit perfomance of individual components and the optical system.
    Undertake calculations for simple optical information systems. Provide an assessment of the practical limiting factors in such systems.
    Provide an alternative design to satisfy different specifications.

    (S4) On successful completion of this module, the student should have: Knowledge and understanding of electronic to optical conversion and the associated devices.
    Knowledge and understanding of optical to electronic conversion and the associated devices.
    An appreciation of how to manipulate light rays.
    An understanding of power transfer, modulation transfer function, system transfer function and optical data storage.
    Knowledge and understanding of the duality of light.
    An appreciation of intensity and phase related effects of light.
    An appreciation of the limits of information transfer by optical systems.
    An understanding of how information may be transferred via optical intensity and phase modulation.

  • Neural Networks (ELEC320)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    Understand the basic structures and the learning mechanisms underlying neural networks within the field of artificial intelligence and examine how synaptic adaptation can facilitate learning and how input to output mapping can be performed by neural networks.

    Obtain an overview of linear, nonlinear, separable and non separable classification as well as supervised and unsupervised machine learning.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learning  the advantages and main characteristics of neural networks in relation to traditional methodologies. Also, familiarity with different neural networks structures and their learning mechanisms.

    (LO2) Understanding of the neural network learning processes and their most popular types, as well as  appreciation of how neural networks can be applied to artificial intelligence problems.

    (S1) On successful completion of this module the student should be able to pursue further study in artificial intelligence and more advanced types of neural networks.

    (S2) On successful completion of this module the student should be able to analyse numerically the mathematical properties of most major network types and apply them to artificial intelligence problems.

    (S3) On successful completion of this module the student should be able to approach methodically artificial intelligence problems and understand the principal mathematics of learning systems.

  • Organic Electronics (ELEC324)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The main aim is to make the students aware of the new developments in large-area, low-cost and flexible Electronics, particularly those relating to the use of conjugated polymer and fullerene based compounds and composites.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understandingof the operation of organic Schottky diode, thin-film transistors, light-emittingdiodes and photovoltaics

    (LO2) Knowledge to analyse novel organic device models

    (LO3) Ability to analyse static and dynamic organic circuits

    (LO4) Ability to utilise organic models to design simple organic circuits

    (S1) The knowledge gained will relate directly to the use of conjugated polymers and small molecules in electronic and photonic devices, for application that go well beyond the capability of silicon in terms of area, flexibility and costs.The work is an example of the use of physical properties to real and important applications. This is an intellectually stimulating challenge that will build confidence in other problems.The work will build an understanding of the measurement techniques and their uses and limitations. In addition, the student will be expected to develop the intellectual capability in using the principle in real and applicable designs.

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

    (S3) Information skills - Critical reading

    (S4) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

    (S5) Designing simple organic based circuits

  • Drives (ELEC331)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To introduce students to a range of electrical machines (AC & DC) using the concepts of rotating magnetic fields and co-energy.

    To facilitate the prediction of machine performance by the use of equivalent circuits.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) A greater understanding of how the physical laws of electromagnetism and mechanics apply to practical motors and transformers;
    A familiarity with the features of the common machines such as DC (series, shunt and brushless) and AC (synchronous and asynchronous);
    An understanding of how the physical phenomena, represented by equivalent circuit parameters, affect the device performance;
    An appreciation of relationships and similarities between different types of machine.
    An appreciation of the operating characteristics of machines.

    (S1) After successfully completing the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning, Problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) After successful completion of the module, the student should be able to demonstrate practical skills in the following discipline specific areas:- The connection of a synchronous machine to a three phase, fixed frequency, AC supply (Synchronizing) using an equivalent circuit to predict the performance of various machines.

    (S3) After successfully completing the module the student should:- Have the ability to translate the complex physical nature of machines into a simple equivalent circuit representation; Be able to apply the complex number theory learnt in other modules to the analysis of electrical machines; Have the ability to explain the operation of synchronous and asynchronous AC machines in terms of rotating magnetic fields.

    (S4) After successfully completing the module, the student should have: A greater understanding of how the physical laws of electromagnetism and mechanics apply to practical motors and transformers; A familiarity with the features of the common machines such as DC (series, shunt and brushless) and AC (synchronous and asynchronous); An understanding of how the physical phenomena, represented by equivalent circuit parameters, affect the device performance; An appreciation of relationships and similarities between different types of machine. An appreciation of the operating characteristics of machines.

  • Application Development With C++ (ELEC362)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting40:60
    Aims

    To provide students with the ability:
    To design and implement a console based application using C++.
    To utilise Object Oriented Programming concept in designing and implementing software applications.
    To design and implement an application Graphical User Interface (GUI).
    To use common components including controls in cross-platform GUI programme.
    To implement event handlers and validate the programme functionality.
    To work independently or as a team member in the management of application development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and Understanding--On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate:Knowledge of C++ as an advanced programming language.Understanding of Object-oriented programme design.Knowledge of the principles of system development.Understanding of Graphical User Interface applications and their components.

    (S1) Intellectual Abilities--On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of the above topics to:
    Analysis and design of the structure of console application.
    Analysis and design of the structure of Graphical User Interface based application.
    Testing and evaluation of the performance of software.

    (S2) Practical Skills--On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline-specific practical skills:
    Use of visual development tools for programming with C++
    Set-up of application project and generation of system components System integration.
    Efficient use of Qt documentation and online resources for independent learning of advanced development tools for GUI programmes.

    (S3) General Transferable Skills-- On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills:
    Independent learning.
    Project management.
    Software documentation.

  • Embedded Computer Systems (ELEC370)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To obtain an understanding of the construction and operation of embedded computer systems and their components.

    Furthermore to gain an understanding of how computer performance is dependent upon the design of computer architectures and sub-circuits.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the internal operation of a CPU

    (LO2) Knowledge of some methods used to increase CPU performance

    (LO3) Knowledge of some methods used to increase CPU performance

    (LO4) Knowledge of some methods used to increase CPU performance

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) After successful completion of the module: students should be able to determine how any computer system functions from published data and be able to apply this to developing simple processor systems from large scale modules.

    (S3) On successful completion of the module: the student should be able to understand published data concerning use of typical computer system components.

    (S4) After successful completion of the module, the student should have: An understanding of the internal operation of a CPU Knowledge of some methods used to increase CPU performance, an understanding of the difference between RISC and CISC type systems and knowledge of memory systems.

  • Integrated Circuits - Concepts and Design (ELEC372)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting45:55
    Aims

    To understand the reasons for the predominance and importance of silicon based microelectronics to the semiconductor industry.

    To understand how materials, devices and circuit issues are inter-related and exploited to make the microchips that underpin the information age.

    To prepare students for entering the Si semiconductor industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: Independent learning. Problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) On successful completion of the module the student the skill to: Use a professional, unix based design suite, Cadence

    (S3) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of the module topics to Ability to use a professional design tool (Cadence) to design, layout and test by simulation digital circuit cells.

    (S4) On successful completion of the module the student is expected to have: Appreciation of MOS based integrated circuit design philosophy: power, speed, yield, packing density considerations and of design trade-offs associated with materials, device and circuit limitations. Knowledge of how to analyse and design simple MOS logic gates and amplifier stages. Appreciation of historical and future development of silicon based integrated circuit technology.       Knowledge of silicon integrated circuit technology. Appreciation of some IC design issues.

  • Digital and Wireless Communications (ELEC377)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    To provide an extensive coverage of the theory and practice of digital and wireless communication systems.

    To allow students to be able to design and develop digital and wireless communication systems, with an awareness of all the main factors involved and of existing and emerging technologies.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) After completion of the module, the student should have a good knowledge and understanding of:The nature of data and how it is stored and communicated.The limitations imposed on communication system performance and design by various factorsHow noise arises in communications systems, and its effects of noise upon communications system behaviour and performance.Sources and effects of mobile radio propagations.Design of the optimum receiver and analysis of error probability for digital communicationsHow to achieve the goals of a communication system by trading off system parameters such as signal-to-noise ratio, error probability and bandwidth expenditureVarious multiuser communication techniques

    (LO2) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a knowledge in applying the module topics to:Specify the requirements for a digital or wireless communication systemDesign the optimum receiver for a communication systemAnalyse the performance of a communication systemCritical thinking ability from evaluating and responding to issues such as unachievable or impractical specifications and impossible performance claims.

    (S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

    (S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

    (S4) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline:-

    Specific skills applying signal and system design to the engineering problems associated with communication systems, e.g., how to combat wireless fading channels.

    Identifying the channel degradation sources and their effects in a communications system. Simulation of a communication system via MATLAB.

  • Electromagnetic Compatibility (ELEC382)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module is aimed to provide the students with advanced knowledge and skills to deal with EMC problems.

    The students are expected to master the  fundamental EMC principles and concepts based on the underlying electromagnetic theory.

    To study  EMC standa rds and regulations, and be able to apply them to real world problems.

    To be able to use advanced theory too analyse EMC problems.

    To be able to conduct EMC measurements and tests, and also interprete the results.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An indepth understanding of EMC theory, standards and practice.

    (LO2) Ability to conduct EMC tests and analysis.

    (LO3) Ability to conduct EMC analysis and designs

    (LO4) Knowledge and skills and solve EMC problems

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the folowing key skills: Independent learning Problem solving and design skills.

    (S2) After successful completion of the module, the student should be able to: Demonstrate their familiarity with the various measurement techniques used to assess the electromagnetic compatibility of both hardware and systems.

    (S3) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to: Demonstrate their ability to apply sound EMC analytical and design techniques when dealing with both conducted and radiated interference and times domains, and their applicability to engineering systems, is prerequisite knowledge.

    (S4) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to: Demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the relevant EU regulations governing EMC. Be capable of analysing EMC problems by applying sound electromagnetics principles to networks of current-carrying conductors whether as cable configurations or in circuits/systems involving active and passive devices.

  • Advanced Modern Management (MNGT352)
    Level3
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The Aims of this module are as follows:

    To introduce the student to various aspects of advanced modern management.

    To develop a knowledge and understanding of modern management tools.

    To stimulate an appreciation of management and its importance in organisational success.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students who complete this module will obtain a good understanding of the following:    The scientific theory of industrial psychology and organisational behaviour.    The key components of operations and management.    The impact of supply chain and logistics to modern business.

    (LO2) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of the above topics to:    Analysis of organisation behaviour.    Analysing of operations systems and performance evaluation.    Analysis and modelling of supply chain.

    (S1) On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills: in descriptive writing in qualitative and quantitative analysis and problem-solving

    (S2) On completion of the module, students should have gained the following practical skills: Management awareness. Strategy development based on case studies including proposals for improvement.

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

All programmes are taught over two semesters with examinations at the end of each semester. Modules vary from those which are assessed by examination only to others which are continuous assessment only. All programmes incorporate a substantial practical component, with an increasing emphasis on project work as you progress through to the final year. You can select your final year individual project in consultation with members of staff.


Assessment

Exam, coursework, projects