Architectural Engineering BEng (Hons) Add to your prospectus

  • Offers study abroad opportunities Offers study abroad opportunities
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Key information


  • Course length: 3 years
  • UCAS code: HK26
  • Year of entry: 2018
  • Typical offer: A-level : ABB / IB : 33 / BTEC : Not accepted without grade B in A Level Mathematics
engineering-5

Module details

Programme Year One

LAB COATS - Students will generally be required to wear a lab coat for all Engineering laboratory sessions. Students may purchase a lab coat at the start of the year from the Student Support Office at a subsidised cost of £15.

SAFETY BOOTS – Students undertaking Architectural and Civil Engineering programmes will be required to wear safety shoes or boots (that is to say with both toe cap and midsole protection conforming to European safety legislation) for some activities, and these must be provided by the students themselves.

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Technology 1.2: Structure and Construction (ARCH161)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
  • To introduce the principles of construction technology and in particular the common materials and systems in buildings.
  • To introduce the principles of structural design, and in particular the loadbearing components and systems in buildings.​

  • ​To introduce aspects and examples of building technologies and construction sequences.

  • Learning OutcomesDevelop awareness of the principles of structural design, the construction techniques and materials used to attain appropriate strength, stability, and stiffness.

    Develop an awareness of the relationship between structural behaviour and architectural design; how the two can complement each other.

    ​Develop an understanding of the principles of construction technology, and construction sequences

    ​Develop an understanding of the relationship between architectural design and construction technology

    ​Develop an understanding of the relationship between architectural, structural design and building technologies

    This module complies with RIBA mapping criteria as described in the following document: http//www.liv.ac.uk/media/livacuk/architecture/downloads/ARB,mapping,per,criterion.pdf​

  • Engineering Mathematics (MATH198)
    Level1
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide a basic level of mathematicsincluding calculus and extend the student''s knowledge to include an elementaryintroduction to complex variables and functions of two variables.

    Learning Outcomes

    • differentiate using the chain, product and quotient rules;

     

    ​​

     sketch the graphs of elementary and rational functions;

    integrate using list integrals, substitution and integration by parts with applications to simple geometrical problems;

     understand the basic properties of three dimensional vectors and apply them to elementary geometrical problems;

     understand the algebra of complex numbers in Cartesian and polar forms and their application to multiplication, division and roots.

     solve elementary first and second order differential equations with and without initial conditions and make simple mechanical applications;

     evaluate simple Laplace transforms and their inverses using tables with application to initial value problems;

     understand the graphical representation of functions of two variables;

    ​find partial derivatives and use to locate and classify the stationary points of a function of two variables

  • Solids and Structures 1 (ENGG110)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting75:25
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and theory of how engineering structures work to sustain loads. It will also show how stress analysis leads to the design of safer structures.  It will also provide students with the means to analyse and design basic structural elements as used in modern engineering structures.

    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principles of static equilibrium of structural systems

    ​Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how structures sustain loads without failing

    ​Ability to analyse stress and strain in basic structural members as a means to designing safer structures

    ​Ability to size basic structural members for given limiting stress criteria in a design context

  • Context 1.1: History of Architecture (ARCH171)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To give students an outline knowledge of how architecture with its associated technologies, cultural connections and urban settings has evolved from ancient times to the twentieth century.

    Learning OutcomesAn outline knowledge of some of the main themes in world architectural history, and an introduction to the cultural, social and intellectual histories, theories and technologies which influence the design of buildings (RIBA: GC2.1)

    ​An outline knowledge of some of the major pre-modern technologies and spatial and social issues which have shaped architecture worldwide, introducing the influence of architectural history and theory on the spatial, social, and technological aspects of architecture (RIBA: GC2.2)

    ​An outline knowledge of the relationship between architecture and other arts, introducing the influence of the theories, practices and technologies of selected areas of the fine arts on architectural design (RIBA: GC3.1)

  • Surveying (CIVE152)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To inform and educate students on the principles and techniques of land surveying and setting-out. The module will provide the students with the neccessary exposure, understanding and appreciation of the application of basic surveying methods along with an acknowledgement of more advanced methods which are typically being employed in industry.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Knowledge and Understanding

    At the end of this module a student is expected to:
    • Understand the principles of land surveying and setting-out of construction;
    • Know how to determine the plan positions and height of points using a range of surveying techniques and understand what equipment is required to do this and how that equipment is used;
    • Know how to use a range of surveying instruments to measure horizontal and vertical angles, and distances and understand what equipment is required to do this and how that equipment is used;
    • Know how to carry out field surveys to a reasonable degree of accuracy and use the measurements so obtained to produce design information and understand what equipment is required to do this and how that equipment is used;
    • Understand the basics of co-ordinate systems, including local scale factors, and height datums;
    • Appreciate and reduce observational error;
    • Correct and/or distribute computational error;
    • Have a basic understanding of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and its application to surveying and setting out;
    • Know how to extract designed survey information and set-out on site the features indicated by such information.
    • Acknowledge and appreciate the more advanced and innovative surveying techniques and equipment used in industry and how these methods can be used and;
    • Appreciate the health and safety aspects in the context of surveying of sites/structures prior to construction and setting out on site.

    ​Intellectual Abilities

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in:
    • explain the principles and techniques involved in establishing control, detail surveying and setting-out on site;
    • specify basic principles and methods used to measure co-ordinates, directions, distances and height differences;
    • outline the nature of observational errors, apply variance propagation and recognise the benefits of least squares estimation;
    • explain the role of standards and specifications in surveying and setting-out;
    • perform relevant survey calculations;
    • explain the use of survey information in design and construction projects; and
    • outline the means of obtaining survey information in practice.

    ​Practical Skills

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline-specific practical skills:
    • determining the plan positions and heights of points using a range of surveying techniques and instruments commonly used by land surveyors and on construction projects for setting out;
    • use relevant data processing and survey adjustment methods;
    • carrying out field surveys to a reasonable degree of accuracy;
    • use survey data effectively in design work
    • present field records and derived data in a clear professional manner
    • extracting designed survey information and setting out on site the features indicated by such information.
    • appreciating when more advanced and innovative surveying techniques may be required

    General Transferable Skills

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following key skills:
    • computing and IT;
    • mathematics;
    • manipulation and interpretation of data;
    • solution to technical problems using numerical methods
    • efficient team working
  • Fluid Mechanics With Thermodynamics (ENGG105)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To develop an understanding of the basic principles of fluid mechanics and an appreciation of thermodynamics

    To develop skills in performing simple experiments

    Learning Outcomes

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to showexperience and enhancement of discipline-specific practical skills in usingappropriate modelling and analytical methods to solve fluid mechanics andthermodynamics problems.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to showexperience and enhancement of discipline-specific practical skills in carryingout Level 1 laboratory experiments in Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamicsfollowing instruction, using test and measurement equipment and techniques,collecting and recording data, estimating accuracy, assessing errors, and usingsafe systems of work.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able todemonstrate knowledge and understanding of using dimensional analysis toundertaken scale-model testing and ensure conditions of dynamic similarity

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able todemonstrate knowledge and understanding of hydrostatics and applications tomanometry

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able todemonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concept of mass conservation andthe the continuity equation applied to one-dimensional flows.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able todemonstrate knowledge and understanding of Bernoulli''s equation as applied tointernal and external flow problems including open channel flow

     On successful completion of themodule, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding ofthe hydrodynamic forces which arise due to changes in the velocity anddirection of a fluid stream.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able todemonstrate knowledge and understanding of the equation of heat transfer asapplied to problems of plane and circular geometries

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able todemonstrate knowledge and understanding of the steady flow energy equation asapplied to a control volume

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able todemonstrate knowledge and understanding of the first law as applied to athermodynamic system and the determination of thermodynamic work for a process.

  • Introduction to Civil and Architectural Engineering (CIVE113)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To provide students with an introductory understanding of civil engineering project design;

    ​To introduce students to engineering sketching, drawing and visualisation;

    To expose students to group work and the overall design process;

    To develop technical report writing & oral presentation skills;

    To develop information research, summary and referencing skills;

    To develop IT and computational skills for engineering applications;

    To provide a basic introduction to issues involved in large engineering project design;

    To develop data analysis and plotting skills using, Excel, MATLAB or similar software methods.

    Learning OutcomesKnowledge and Understanding: the variety of types, scales, components and issues involved in major civil engineering schemes​Knowledge and Understanding: ​the civil engineering design process from concept to implementation​Knowledge and Understanding: ​the professional context of civil engineering and its key project management implements​Knowledge and Understanding: ​the national and global context in which civil engineers operate and the Grand Challenges they face​ ​Intellectual Ability: ability to derive specific information from a case study and utilise this information to develop justified specifications for  infrastructure scheme design aided by appropriate engineering resources, software and skills​​​Intellectual Ability: ability to develop and present conceptual solutions to complex engineering problems and individual components of these using written, verbal and visual media.

    ​Intellectual Ability: ability to critically compare between different options or proposals both qualitatively and quantitatively using appropriate data and techniques. 

  • Civil and Architectural Design and Technology (CIVE114)
    Level1
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ​To raise the students awareness and skills using known BIM tools popular within the industry.

    To provide students with a good grasp of engineering modelling and computer-aided drawing skills relating to the design process.

    ​To give an overview of checking and commenting on Building Information Models for design reviews.​
    Learning Outcomes

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the latest advances in computational engineering drawing, modelling and communication.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of commonly used BIM (Building Information Modelling) tools, processes and procedures in the Architectural, Civil and Structural engineering community.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how design concepts are communicated in both 3D and 2D modelling space.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a strong ability in creating detailed 3D models of aspects of the built environement (e.g. bridges, buildings and roads etc).

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a strong ability in developing and presenting professional 2D construction level information from an accurate 3D model.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the function and purpose of Building Information Models.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate a proficient level of capability in the use of Autodesk Revit to create Building Information Models. Students should also have a basic awareness/proficiency in using review software, such as Navisworks, to visualise and interrogate Building Information Models.

    ​On successful completion of the module, students should have a basic awareness/proficiency in using review software, such as Navisworks, to visualise and interrogate Building Information Models.

  • Mathematical Techniques for Engineers (MATH199)
    Level1
    Credit level22.5
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide a basic level of mathematics including calculus and extend the student''s knowledge to include an elementary introduction to complex variables and functions of two variables.

    Learning Outcomes

    After completing the module the students should be able to:

    • differentiate using the chain, product and quotient rules;

    • sketch the graphs of elementary and rational functions;

    • integrate using list integrals, substitution and integration by parts with applications to simple geometrical problems;

    • understand the basic properties of three dimensional vectors and apply them to elementary geometrical problems;

    • understand the algebra of complex numbers in Cartesian and polar forms and their application to multiplication, division and roots.

    • solve elementary first and second order differential equations with and without initial conditions and make simple mechanical applications;

    • evaluate simple Laplace transforms and their inverses using tables with application to initial value problems;

    • understand the graphical representation of functions of two variables;

    • find partial derivatives and use to locate and classify the stationary points of a function of two variables

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Context 2.1: History and Theory of Architecture (ARCH271)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims
  • The aim of this module is to investigate, in depth, the attributes of selected examples of twentieth-century architecture and their associated cultural, social and intellectual framework and to demonstrate, through building analysis, the influence of historical and theoretical concepts on the spatial, social and technological aspects of twentieth-century architecture.

  • Learning Outcomes

    ​Knowledge of the cultural, social and intellectual histories, theories and technologies which influence the design of buildings (RIBA GC2.1)

    ​Knowledge of architectural history and theory on the spatial, social and technological aspects of archirtecture (RIBA GC2.2)

    ​The influence of the theories, practices and technologies of selected areas of the fine arts on architectural design (RIBA GC3.1 and GC3.2)

  • Solids & Structures 2 (ENGG209)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    To provide awareness and some understanding of the principles of solid mechanics applied to engineering structures. In particular, the behaviour and types of failure (instability) of simple elastic systems and structural members used in aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering applications.

    Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge and understanding of ​solid mechanics principles applied to engineering structures such as beams, columns and pin-jointed frames;

    Awareness about the types of behaviour of simple elastic structural systems;

    ​​Ability to predict the behaviour and failure (instability) of simple elastic structural systems;

    ​Ability to determine the stresses in nonsymmetric thin-walled sections; 

    ​Appreciation of the importance of boundary conditions​

  • Structural Behaviour and Modelling (CIVE202)
    Level2
    Credit level7.5
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module prepares students to achieve an understanding of and be familiar with structural analysis. It will also encourage the appropriate use of computer software packages in structural analysis which when combined with a development of the students qualitative understanding of structures will consolidate their understanding of the principles of structural analysis.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theory used in computer programs for the analysis of frames.

    ​students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of approximate methods and application of a qualitative understanding of structures for use in preliminary design and for checking software results.

    ​students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the dangers of relying on software alone.

    students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of​the role of analysis in the design process.

    ​students should be able to apply, at a deeper level, the engineering principles used in structural analysis.

    ​students shouldbe able to estimate, without a computer, the magnitude of stresses in a simple structure.

    students shouldbe able to​calculate bending moments, shear forces and axial forces in a structure.

    students shouldbe able to an analysis package to analyse a structure and effectively check output.

    ​students should be able to show experience and enhancement of approximating the response of a structure due to gravity using quantitative methods.

    ​students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the use of GSA (General Structural Analysis) industry-standard software for solving structural problems.

    ​students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the ability to validate (by simple hand calculation) the output from a computer obtained structural analysis.

    ​students should be able to show experience and enhancement of theuse analysis results in the structural design of a system.

  • Environmental Design 2 (ARCH211)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
    Aims

    To develop from user requirements an introduction to design of  passive and active environmental systems for buildings, their integration into building fabric and structural systems, and selection of appropriate design options, equipment and materials.

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Students to be able to identify plausible strategies and material use from vernacular architecture to use in modern buildings to reduce energy consumption.

    Students to be able to select appropriate passive strategies for the climate of the building.

    ​Students to be able to appreciate the importance of using computer simulation to analyse their design options and BIM

    ​Students to be able to select appropriate materials, including consideration for re-use and re-cycling.

  • Reinforced Concrete and Steelwork (CIVE241)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
    Aims
    • To explain and illustrate the basic behaviour of both a reinforced concrete section and a steel section under various load conditions.
    • To highlight the limiting conditions applicable to both materials.
    • To relate the basic behaviour to conditions specified in the relevant code of practice.
    • To emphasize sustainability, health and safety in design of reinforced concrete and steel structures.
    Learning Outcomes

    ​Knowledge and Understanding

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
    • basic behaviour of various forms of structural members;
    • the Ultimate and Serviceability Limit States;
    • the importance of reinforcement in a concrete beam and its contribution to the overall behaviour;
    • the selection of the most appropriate structural steel form for any application;
    • the loading acting on a structural member and the path of the load;
    • the various codes of practice to be used;
    • design of sustainable structures;
    • health and safety issues related to the design.

    ​Intellectual Abilities

    On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in:
    • selecting the appropriate section sizes for both concrete and steel sections for any form of applied loading;
    • evaluating the limiting values for any section chosen.

    ​Practical Skills

    On completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline-specific practical skills:
    • analysis and design of concrete and steel structures for any given loading;
    • evaluating the loading on any structure.

    ​General Transferable Skills

    On completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of key skills in:
    • manipulation of data;
    • presentation of analytical analysis and design
  • Soil Mechanics (CIVE224)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the fundamental principles and concepts which form the basis of soil mechanics, It seeks to enable students to learn how to apply these principles to real-life geotechnical engineering problems, including analysis of slope stability, calculation of pressure distribution against retaining walls, and design of shallow foundations in different soils.

    Learning Outcomes

    Knowledge and Understanding

    On successful completion of the module, students should have the following knowledge:  Basic soil properties, their measurement and calculation; Groundwater flow and its impact on mechanical properties of soil; 
    Stresses in soil and their calculation; Shear strength of soil and its measurement; 
    Consolidation and its measurement & calculation;
    Design of earth slopes;
    Design of shallow foundations;
    Lateral earth pressures and their calculation.

      ​​Intellectual Abilities
      On successful completion of the module, students should be capable of: 
      Analysing stability of existing slopes, designing cuttings and embankments;

      Designing strip foundations, rectangular foundations and circular foundations under both central and eccentric loading;

      Designing cantilever walls;

      ​General Transferable Skills 

      On successful completion of the module, students should be capable of:
      Analysing and discussing experimental results;
      Writing full lab reports and technical notes.  

      Practical Abilities 

      On completion of the module, students should be capable of measuring thefollowing soil properties:

      ·  Permeability, using the constant head method;

      ·  Shear strength, using both the direct shear-box and triaxial methods.​

    • Group Design Project (CIVE263)
      Level2
      Credit level15
      SemesterSecond Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To give students an opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding from many different aspects of their taught modules to a unified design project and to promote teamwork and industrial awareness.

       

      Learning Outcomes

      ​At the end of this module a student is expected to understand and appreciate the fundamental design work stages adopted during the delivery of a core civil/structural engineering project - from inception-to-concept-to-solution.

      ​At the end of this module a student is expected to understand the complexity involved in delivering a structural design that needs to meet a stringent client brief whilst trying to achieve a solution that is iconic, sustainable, efficient, econmic and practical and fits within the constraints of a particular site.

      ​At the end of this module a student is expected to understand when, where and how to apply analytical and design skills to a particular phase of a structural design project in view of the deliverables of a particular phase.

      ​At the end of this module a student is expected to understand and appreciate the bigger picture regarding a client project in terms of economic and cultural drivers.

      ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in delivering a design solution to particular brief utlising appropriate practical and technical skills.

      ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in applying hollistic, qualitative, and quantitative and specialist numerical design procedures to arrive at a balanced, group derived, feasible design solution. 

      ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in implementing and demonstrating sustainability (environmental, social and financial) in design.

      ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in designing basic structural elements in both steel and concrete and appreciating the way elements combine to produce a load path through the completed structure down to the ground and into a substructure.

      ​On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in using CDM principles in design. 

    • Construction Materials (CIVE242)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
      Aims

      This module aims to introduce the factors which influence the selection of materials for engineering purposes, to develop understanding of the properties of these materials, and to lay a foundation for subsequent design work.

      Learning Outcomes

      Knowledge and Understanding​

      On successful completion of the module, students should be able to:

      • be aware of the factors influencing the selection of the most appropriate material for a particular engineering purpose;
      • understanding of key engineering properties of common materials including the influence of microstructure and macrostructure;
      • understand the nature of concrete and the effect of constituents on fresh and hardened properties;
      • understand the procedures for construction with concrete, including quality control tests and procedures;
      • understand the production methods, basic properties and applications of timber in construction;
      • be aware of the different categories of plastics, their basic properties and applications in construction;
      • be aware of the scope for the use of glass in construction, its main types and properties, including engineering, thermal and aesthetic;
      • understand the manufacture and prope rties of masonry, together with its use in construction;
      • design concrete mixes to meet specific requirements, as well as knowing how to cast, cure and test concrete to determine its structural properties;
      • measure mechanical properties of timber and masonary units in the laboratory;
      • be aware of all BS EN standards governing use, properties and applications of construction materials;
      • have a foundation for subsequent design-oriented modules which extend the knowledge and understanding of construction materials.​

      ​Intellectual Abilities

      On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in

      • Selection of appropriate materials;
      • Knowledge of material behaviour under loading conditions resembling real-life situations;
      • Design of normal concrete mixes for construction
      • Measurement of mechanical properties of other construction materials, e.g. timber and masonry.​

      ​Practical Skills

      • Calculation and numeracy skills.
      • Experimental skills: laboratory work involving concrete mix design & testing, including tests on fresh and hardened concrete; testing and interpretation of mechanical properties of timber and masonry.
      • Observational skills: how concrete behaves in its fresh and hardened states; how other construction materials behave under loading and how their properties compare with those of concrete.
      • Teamwork: laboratory project undertaken in groups of approximately 10 students. ​

      ​General Transferable Skills

      • ​Literacy skills: Technical note preparation andreading set textbook​ and handouts. ​

    • Engineering Mathematics II (MATH299)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
      Aims

      To introduce some advanced Mathematics required by Engineers, Aerospace Engineers, Civil Engineers and Mechanical Engineers.

      To develop the students ability to use the mathematics presented in the module in solving problems.

      Learning Outcomes

      A good knowledge of matrices and their use to solve systems of linear equations.

      ​ An understanding of how to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

      A good knowledge of multi-variable calculus​.

    • Project Management (MNGT202)
      Level2
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
      Aims

      The aim of this module is to introduce the student to some of the tools and constraints associated with managing both small and large projects, and with some simple costing approaches. A virtual project is undertaken by every student. The student is encouraged to adopt a project approach to current and future tasks, and to learn the language adopted by project-oriented employers.

      Learning Outcomes

      ​Practical project management

      ​Practical risk management

      ​Practical cost management

      ​Formal meeting administration and record taking

      ​Teamwork and communications

    Year Three Compulsory Modules

    • Individual Project (ENGG341)
      Level3
      Credit level30
      SemesterWhole Session
      Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
      Aims

      To provide an opportunity for the student to:

      • apply engineering knowledge, understanding and skills to plan, carry out and control an open-ended project in a topic of their choice
      • enhance their communication skills: writing proposal, progress and final reports, giving oral presentations and interacting with academic/ research staff.
      • experience a major task similar to those of working as a professional engineer in an industrial or research organisation
      Learning Outcomes

      ​On successful completion of the project, the student should be able to show experience and enhancement in various analytical, modelling, experimental or workshop techniques, depending on the topic and scope of their project.  Students will also demonstrate enhanced understanding of, and expertise in, underlying scientific theory relevant to their own project.

    • Context 3.1: History and Theory of Architecture (ARCH321)
      Level3
      Credit level15
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      Aims

      To develop final year undergraduate skills in the evaluation and presentation of an historical project through seminar-based group study. This module also presents an opportunity for final year students to work in areas where staff are active in research.

      Learning Outcomes

      By the end of the module, students will demonstrate –

      knowledge and understanding of specialised aspect of modern architecture

      ​The ability to research and report on an area of modern architecture

      The ability to work in groups

      The ability to recognise taught material in a slide test

    • Structures 3 (CIVE344)
      Level3
      Credit level7.5
      SemesterFirst Semester
      Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
      AimsThis module aims to acquiant students with plastic material behaviour and its effects on structural member behaviour, and with effective methods for determining collapse mechanisms. The module also aims to introduce students to the principle of plastic structural analysis and methods for assessing collapse loads, and to upper/lower bound theorems and their significance on structural design calculations.
        Learning Outcomes

        understand how a structural member loses resistance and assess the maximum bending moment it can take

        understand why a structure collapses and predict the possible ways it can do so

        develop skills for effectively assessing the collapse load of a structure, including incremental load and limit state analysis methods

        understand the implications of upper and lower bound theorem of plastic analysis and apply it to assess the collapse load of a structure and conservatism in design

      • Earthquake Engineering (CIVE342)
        Level3
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
        Aims

        This module aims at introducing students to earthquake engineering. It acquaints students with basic skills for analyzing the seismic response of structures subjected to earthquake excitations using structural dynamics principles. Background knowledge in engineering seismology will be covered to provide a comprehensive perspective to the topic. Seismic design principles are also introduced to provide a sound understanding of the rationale behind seismic codes.

        Learning Outcomes

        Understand the origin, mechanism and characterization of earthquakes; report and interpret an earthquake event​

        Estimate the response of a linear elastic structure subjected to a given ground motion using structural dynamics principles​

        Calculate the equivalent static load for seismic design and understand seismic design principles

      • Construction Management (CIVE345)
        Level3
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
        Aims
      • ​​To introduce the student to various aspects of construction management.

      • ​To develop a knowledge and understanding of modern management tools as applied in construction.

      • ​To stimulate an appreciation of management and its importance in the success of construction projects.

      • Learning Outcomes

        ​Obtain a good understanding of the multi-disciplinary approaches required for successful completion of construction engineering projects.

        Describe the key components of construction operations and management.

        Be knowledgeable of the impact of the supply chain and advanced technologies / BIM to modern business practices.

        ​Analyse the organisation and planning of construction engineering projects.

        Highlight the distinctive characteristics of the construction industry, and its contribution to UK plc.

        ​Undertake the analysis and modelling of operation systems and performance evaluation within the sector.

      • Geotechnical Engineering (CIVE320)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting80:20
        Aims

        ​This module seeks to teach students how to design various geotechnical engineering structures.  

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Know how to design retaining walls

        ​Know how to design deep foundations

        Know how to model groundwater flow. 

        Know how to analyse a thermal pile

         

        Know how to design suction caisson foundation

         

        Know how calculate regional land subsidence

         

        ​Know how to design dewatering system

         

        ​Know how to design geothermal storage

      • Environmental Design 3 (ARCH311)
        Level3
        Credit level15
        SemesterSecond Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting70:30
        Aims
      • Develop from user requirements an introduction to the design of environmental systems for large buildings.

      • Give insight and background for the ​selection of appropriate equipment and materials, and their integration into building fabric and structural systems.

      • ​Develop background needed to enter into technical discussions in design teams.

      • Learning OutcomesDevelop from user requirements an overview in design of environmental systems for large buildings, selection of appropriate equipment and materials, and their integration into building fabric and structural systems.

         

        NB This module has been mapped against RIBA validation criteria GC9.

        Demonstrate technical knowledge in the three topic areas: Artificial Lighting, Acoustics, and Thermal Environment

        ​Be able to engage in technical discussions and show awareness of the various technical requirements on buildings.

      • Structural Dynamics (ENGG301)
        Level3
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
        Aims

        To develop an understanding of the essential principles governing the free and forced vibration of simple structural systems.

        To develop skills in carrying out and reporting upon simple experiments in Structural Dynamics.

        Learning Outcomes

      Year Three Optional Modules

      • Introduction to Finite Elements (ENGG302)
        Level3
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting55:45
        Aims

        To develop a fundamental understanding of the Finite Element method. 

        To apply the Finite Element methodology to a range of problems, spanning mechanical and civil engineering.

        To develop skills in interpreting and understanding the physical meaning of finite element results.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​At the end of the module, students should will have a fundamental understanding of the capabilities and limitations of modern Finite Element software.

        ​Students will be able to apply the Finite Element methodology to problems across mechanical and civil engineering.

        Students will be able to critisise and interpret the results provided by Finite Element software.​

        Students will understand the importnace of model validation.

      • Prestressed Concrete Design (CIVE343)
        Level3
        Credit level7.5
        SemesterFirst Semester
        Exam:Coursework weighting90:10
        Aims

        To provide an overview of the concepts related to prestressed concrete together with practical construction and application issues.

        Learning Outcomes

        ​Knowledge and Understanding

        On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
        • the nature, construction and performance of prestressed concrete, including sustainability issues.
        • the analysis and design of a simple prestressed concrete beam.
        • the construction, analysis and design of a simple composite beam (precast and insitu concrete).
        • special requirements of precast concrete with emphasis on prestressed concrete (including stability).
        • practical applications of prestressed concrete.
        • awareness of examples of lessons to be learnt through failures (by means of case studies).

        ​Intellectual Abilities

        On successful completion of the module, students should be able to demonstrate ability in:
        • describing and explaining the qualitative aspects of the topics given above.
        • applying relevant methodologies to analysis, design and planning of related work.

        ​Practical Skills

        On successful completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of the following discipline-specific practical skills:
        • Analysis and design of simple prestressed concrete beams, encompassing bending and shear performance.
        • Calculation of losses and deflections in prestressed concrete beams.
        • Analysis of simple precast/insitu composite beams.
        • Laboratory testing of a prestressed concrete beam and the evaluation of results working as part of a team.

        ​General Transferable Skills

        On completion of the module, students should be able to show experience and enhancement of key skills in:
        • Analysis and interpretation of data.
        • Concise report writing.
        • Team working.
        • Self-motivation and time management

      The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.