Climate Science BSc (Hons)

Key information


earth-sci-1

Module details

Year One Compulsory Modules

  • Study Skills (ocean Sciences) (ENVS103)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The aim of this module is to enhance generic and specific skills that are expected from ocean scientists. Specific skills include the use of software for the visualisation of spatial and temporal variation of various oceanographic parameters (e.g. salinity, nutrient concentrations) and the development of practical skills, which consists in the use and/or understanding of specific analytical methods (e.g. determination of oxygen) and specialised oceanographic instruments. Generic skills include science communication (oral, written and visual), team work, time management and an understanding of the concept of academic integrity.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Learn how to use a reference software, make a literature search and reference correctly

    (LO2) Quantitatively summarise, synthesise and interpret data collected during fieldwork

    (LO3) Present scientific content effectively through oral, written and/or poster communications

    (LO4) Understand the analytical procedure for the determination of important analytes (e.g. oxygen, nutrients)

    (LO5) Learn how to use ODV (Ocean Data View software) to visualise spatial variations of oceanographic parameters

    (S1) Numeracy/computational skills - Confidence/competence in measuring and using numbers

    (S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

    (S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

    (S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

    (S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

    (S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

  • Climate, Atmosphere and Oceans (ENVS111)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
    Aims

    Introduce the climate system, the atmosphere and ocean:

    Address how the climate system varies and how climate is controlled by radiative forcing;

    How the structure of the atmosphere is determined and how the atmosphere circulates;

    How the structure of the ocean is determined and how the ocean circulates;

    How the atmosphere and ocean vary together in affecting the present and past climate system.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and Understanding

    a. Understand how physical processes operate within the climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean.

    b. Appreciate the complexity of the climate system, the effect of radiative forcing, the concept of feedbacks, how rotation affects the circulation; the differences between currents and waves.

    c. Gain awareness of the similarities and differences between the atmosphere and ocean.

    d. Gain an awareness of policies and strategies to move towards achieving net zero carbon on a national stage.

    (LO2) Intellectual Abilities

    a. To be able to evaluate the relative importance of different physical processes in the climate systemb.

    b. To develop critical skills in transferring insight gained from one problem to another problem, such as how the atmosphere circulates from one planet to another planet.

    (LO3) Subject Based Practical Skills

    a. Perform simple order of magnitude calculations and make inferences from the results.

    b. Understand the use of units and dimensions.

    (LO4) General Transferable Skills

    a. Application of numbers, involving order of magnitudes and dimensions.

    b. Time management.

    c. Problem solving.

    d. Group work.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Digital fluency : ability to think critically and make balanced judgments, and use digital platforms to collaborate and communicate.

  • Living With Environmental Change (ENVS119)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The over-arching aim of this module is to introduce students to the so-called ‘Grand Challenges’ facing society and what is being done to address them. Living with Environmental Change is a key interdisciplinary research theme currently being addressed worldwide; from tackling climate change and carbon emissions to promoting sustainable resource use and energy efficiency. This module illustrates that an interdisciplinary approach is crucial to identifying the underlying problems faced by humanity and to finding holistic and sustainable solutions.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Obtain an understanding of the Grand Challenges facing society;

    (LO2) Develop an appreciation of the significance of interdisciplinary working in addressing the Grand Challenges;

    (LO3) Understand that Geography plays a key role in the Living With Environmental Change (LWEC) research agenda;

    (LO4) Become familiar with the linkages between research, policy and sustainability.

    (S1) Abstraction and synthesis of information

    (S2) Assessing the merits of contrasting theories and explanations

    (S3) Taking responsibility for learning and reflection upon that learning

    (S4) Synthesising, contextualising and critically evaluating information of different styles and from different sources

  • Introduction to Geoscience and Earth History (ENVS123)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    Provide a broad introduction to the geosciences, emphasising the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. Assuming no prior knowledge of geoscience, this module is accessible for non-geoscience disciplines (as an optional module);
    Equip students to understand the relevance of the more detailed geoscience material following in the rest of their programmes;
    Begin to equip students with key practical skills across a range of geoscience disciplines;
    Begin to expose students to an indicative range of research expertise in the School of Environmental Sciences;
    Develop skills for learning by group interaction and guided research.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Explain current models for the origin and structure of the Earth, and summarise supporting evidence

    (LO2) Explain, with examples, the nature of most common Earth materials, with basic knowledge of why they are important

    (LO3) List processes that are modifying the Earth and its biosphere, including human processes

    (LO4) Define the time and spatial scales involved in the Earth structure and evolution

    (LO5) Relate the 3D structure and evolution of regions of the Earth's crust using typical geological media such as geological maps and cross sections

    (LO6) Introduce the problem of a sustainable biosphere for a rapidly growing human population and the role the geoscience has in defining and tackling this problem

    (S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presenting work

    (S2) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S5) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

  • Marine Ecosystems: Diversity, Processes and Threats (ENVS122)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting64:35
    Aims

    This module aims to introduce students to the diversity of ecosystem types in the marine environment and the various threats that they face.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Acquire knowledge and understanding of representative key ecosystems found in the marine environment.

    (LO2) Be familiar with the marine organisms that live in representative key marine ecosystems.

    (LO3) Acquire a basic knowledge of fundamental ecological principles, transferable to later marine and non-marine modules.

    (LO4) Be aware of the threats that humans may pose to marine ecosystems.

    (LO5) Appreciate how humans assess and may mitigate detrimental impacts to the environment.

    (LO6) Be introduced to the importance to their future studies of critical reading of scientific literature.

  • Theory and Laboratory Experiments in Earth Surface Processes (ENVS165)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module uses a lecture and laboratory-based problem-solving approach to explore some of the fundamental physical and chemical processes underlying physical geography. It is designed to provide a foundation for environmental and physical geography modules in the second and third years.

    It also aims to provide training in careful observation, appropriate handing of liquid and solid samples, and correct use of analytical instruments. Throughout there is emphasis on quality control via replication and reference materials, and appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics.

    *To note that all LOs can be met using fully online delivery methods as needed.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) The core processes and landforms underlying major geomorphic systems

    (LO2) Long term environmental change – Pleistocene and Holocene

    (LO3) A deeper understanding of processes that underlie the interaction between people and the physical environment

    (LO4) Specific knowledge in the use of selected important analytical instruments; and general knowledge about the principles and practice of accurate and precise measurement

    (LO5) Appropriate treatment of data, including quality control, graphical representation, and statistical analysis

    (S1) IT skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Problem solving skills

    (S4) Teamwork

Year One Optional Modules

  • Essential Mathematical Skills (ENVS117)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To create a firm foundation of mathematics relating to pure maths, physics (mechanics) and statistics.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of the module a student should be able to demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of pure mathematics, mathematics mechanics, and statistical mathematics.

    (LO2) At the end of the module the student should be able to;

    - Demonstrate skills in the application of mathematical methods to the solution of problems.

    - Use dimensional analysis and apply it to real world problems.

    (LO3) At the end of the module a student should be able to;

    - Do simple estimations by hand

    - Rearrange algebraic formulae to make the required quantity the subject

    - Insert values in a formula and calculate the correct answer

    - Basic calculus.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Ecology and Conservation (ENVS157)
    Level1
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting100:0
    Aims

    The module aims to introduce students to the key principles that govern the interactions between organisms and their environment, and how these can be used as the basis for conservation.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Understand and explain fundamental principles of how ecological systems are structured and how they function at the scale of individuals, populations and communities

    (LO2) To understand the effects of human activities on communities and ecosystems at a range of timescales

    (LO3) Develop an ability to critically evaluate how ecological understanding and data can be used to inform conservation policy

    (S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

    (S2) Positive attitude/ self-confidence A 'can-do' approach, a readiness to take part and contribute; openness to new ideas and the drive to make these happen

    (S3) Learning skills online studying and learning effectively in technology-rich environments, formal and informal

    (S4) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

Year Two Compulsory Modules

  • Key Skills for Environmental Data Analysis (ENVS202)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop skills in environmental data analysis by applying the Matlab  computing package to process, analyse and plot data. To develop a critical approach to the results of data analysis .

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Use the MATLAB interface to create scripts and functions

    (LO2) Understand the building blocks of programming: variable assignment, conditional statements, program flow control, and function calls.

    (LO3) Be able to read, plot, and interpret a variety of data types.

    (LO4) Be able to construct a program to read data, perform calculations on it, and plot the results, using function calls where appropriate.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT Skills

    (S4) Data intepretation

  • Research and Career Skills (ENVS204)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module develops students' understanding and appreciation of Marine Biology and Ocean and Climate Sciences as contemporary academic disciplines. This module will develop students' subject-specific research and employability skills through the following specific aims:

    Develop capacity to conduct independent research projects, through training in research methods, data analysis and transferable skills.

    Develop students' skills in critical thinking and writing in order to prepare students for subsequent years of study.

    Develop students' awareness of careers and employability. Enabling students to plan for future careers and enhance employability.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Build knowledge of the fields of marine biology, ocean and climate sciences

    (LO2) Develop experience in analysing scientific data, creating professional quality display items and writing a report in a scientific format and style.

    (LO3) Demonstrate an understanding of how to evaluate scientific literature

    (LO4) Develop and improve personal employability skills

    (LO5) Enhance ability to write reports and essays in a technical scientific style

  • Changing Environments (ENVS214)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting34:66
    Aims

    At the end of this module, students will have  a strong understanding of the mechanisms that have shaped our landscape over time; laboratory and computer skills to yield environmental reconstructions; a critical insight of the different techniques and methodologies for reconstructing past environments; an understanding of the importance to study the past to forecast future environmental change.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) At the end of this module, students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the global changes that have affected the Earth in the recent past

    (LO2) Students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the key characteristics of important depositional environments

    (LO3) Students will have acquired theoretical knowledge of the major environmental indicators used  in these environments and the dating techniques

    (LO4) Through practical work, you will have acquired practical knowledge of different laboratory techniques needed for environmental reconstruction.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) IT skills

    (S4) Communication skills

  • Environmental Sustainability (ENVS218)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to; introduce students to current thinking in relation to sustainable development and locate environmental sustainability within this broader framework of ideas;
    Develop an understanding of various dimensions of environmental sustainability and their relationship to patterns of human development;
    Develop an understanding of the role of the public and private sectors in promoting environmentally sustainable development.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students completing the course successfully should be aware of current thinking in relation to sustainable development and be able to locate environmental sustainability within this broader framework of ideas

    (LO2) Students completing the course successfully should have an understanding of various dimensions of environmental sustainability and their relationship to patterns of development;

    (LO3) Students completing the course successfully should develop an understanding of the role of the public and private sectors in promoting environmentally sustainable development.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) International awareness

  • Climatology (ENVS231)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    The module aims to provide knowledge and understanding across a number of areas of meteorology and weather, covering physical processes. These processes are covered at a detailed level and supported by an overview of the subject area. This module gives the scientific foundation for more discursive as well as process orientated final year modules. The practicals provide an introduction to aspects of meteorological analysis. These are supported through the general lecture programme.  The practical series add to the learning experience and skills to enable students to apply what is learnt in the lecture programme.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Evaluate appropriate theories, methods and techniques

    (LO2) Recognise how selected environments interact with appropriate atmospheric and weather processes

    (LO3) Understand different weather from high, mid and tropical latitudes

    (LO4) Apply practical data analysis.

    (S1) The handling of large datasets

    (S2) Written and graphical communication

    (S3) Analysis and problem-solving through quantitative and qualitative methods

    (S4) Numeracy and statistical literacy

  • Marine Pollution (ENVS232)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting45:55
    Aims

    To introduce students to the main anthropogenic stressors, their effects and importance on the marine system

    To train students in literature search and reading of scientific papers

    To enhance writing and communication skills

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) An understanding of the main anthropogenic stressors of the marine system, their causes, functioning, effects and their remediation/regulation;

    (LO2) An awareness of current problems (news + scientific papers)

    (LO3) To enhance communication skills

    (LO4) To learn how to use Web of Science

    (S1) Communication skills

    (S2) International awareness

  • Oceanography, Plankton and Climate (ENVS245)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module will provide a multi-disciplinary view of how ocean physics, microbiology, chemistry and plankton ecology operate in different ocean environments, explain how Earth's climate is affected by the plankton, and show how plankton ecosystems are responding to a changing climate.

    The aim is then to use this multi-disciplinary framework to develop skills in setting sensible hypotheses, numeracy, problem-solving and written communication. Throughout the module material will connect to the research currently being carried out by staff, using research results and research tools to illustrate key concepts and formulate methods to test hypotheses.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will gain a broad understanding of how different plankton communities arise in different oceanic regimes, and how that ultimately structures food chains to larger marine animals and effects Earth's climate.

    (LO2) Students will be able to compare quantitatively the scales of different processes, and critically assess their relative importance for life in the ocean.

    (LO3) Students will strengthen, and acquire new, skills in quantifying physical-biological drivers of ecosystems.

    (LO4) Students will learn the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to marine biology and gain experience in solving novel problems.

    (LO5) Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in physical and biological oceanography.

    (LO6) Students will learn the importance of understanding the assumptions behind key theories in oceanography.

    (LO7) Students will learn how to frame and test hypotheses using appropriate data and methods.

    (LO8) Students will develop skills in written communication of science.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S4) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

  • Geomorphology: Ice, Sea and Air (ENVS252)
    Level2
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    The module aims  to 1) develop an understanding of major geomorphic systems  and 2) how they create terrestrial landforms.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding ofthe functioning of major geomorphic processes

    (LO2) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the relationship between geomorphic processes and climate

    (LO3) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the magnitude, frequency and spatial scales and timescales under which geomorphic processes operate

    (LO4) On completion of this module the students will demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the importance of linkages between geomorphic process, material and resulting landform (energy/material interaction).

    (S1) Field work: measuring and quantifying an observable process

    (S2) Group work: generating data through team work

    (S3) Field work: logging and mapping sediments in lateral and vertical succession

Year Three Compulsory Modules

  • Politics of the Environment (ENVS325)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This unit is designed to critically evaluate the political responses to the growing impact that environmental issues and the concept of sustainability are having on decision making at all levels of governance, (international, national and local). More specifically the unit aims to;
    Develop an understanding of the growing importance of environmental and sustainable development thinking in political decision-making processes.
    Explore different environmental attitudes, values and perspectives and examine the impact on various political perspectives.
    Develop an understanding of the opportunities and limitations of environmental decision making international dimension of environmental politics and its impact on nation states.
    Understand the role that environmental pressure groups have in shaping political decisions at the international, national and local levels of governance.
    Explore the policy responses at national and local levels to the new emerging environmental agenda.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) an appreciation of how environmental issues are being developed at all levels of governance

    (LO2) an understanding of different environmental values and attitudes and the way that these impact upon political philosophy and decision-making;

    (LO3) an understanding of the way that various environmental interest groups impact on political and other decision making processes an understanding of the way that various environmental intereste groups impact on political and other decision making processes

    (S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S2) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

    (S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

  • Glaciology Past, Present and Future (ENVS330)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To provide students with experience in:
    The application of glaciological theory within current research;
    In-depth knowledge reflecting most up to date understanding of glaciers and ice sheets;
    Analysis of data, and how to interpret and present this as a piece of academic research;
    Develop ability to critically apply glaciological knowledge to novel scenarios as part of concisely written summary assessments on each topic.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Engage with and evaluate the latest glaciological research

    (LO2) Critically apply glaciological theory to given scenarios

    (LO3) Assess the wider implications of glaciology to society and the climate system

    (S1) Numeracy

    (S2) Problem solving skills

    (S3) Organisational skills

    (S4) Communication skills

    (S5) IT skills

    (S6) Critical skills

  • Global Carbon Cycle (ENVS335)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To provide students with a view of the global carbon cycle as a dynamic system;
    To give students an appreciation of the importance of chemical and biological processes in controlling the distribution of carbon in the atmosphere, ocean and land;
    To provide students with an in depth understanding of how carbon is transfered between the atmosphere, land and ocean over contemporary and glacial timescales.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will learn how physical, chemical and biological process control the transfer of carbon between the atmosphere, ocean and land, and the distribution of carbon species between these environments

    (LO2) Students will understand the role and significance that the atmosphere, land and ocean plays in the global cycling of carbon

    (LO3) Students will understand the pathways involved in cycling of inorganic and organic carbon between land and the ocean and the surface and deep ocean, with emphasis on the solubility, carbonate and biological pumps

    (LO4) Students will gain hands-on experience in calculating the response of the ocean to increasing temperature and atmospheric CO2 using the internationally-applied software CO2sys, providing an opportunity for authentic assessment.

    (LO5) Students will understand how environmental change is perturbing the global carbon cycle in the present day. Topics covered will include ocean acidification and changes in the surface temperature

    (S1) Numeracy (application of) manipulation of numbers, general mathematical awareness and its application in practical contexts (e.g. measuring, weighing, estimating and applying formulae)

    (S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

    (S3) Communication, listening and questioning, respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations

  • Contemporary Issues in Ocean and Climate Sciences (ENVS366)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    To promote awareness, understanding and discussions about contemporary issues in Ocean and Climate Sciences.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Gain a broad and detailed knowledge of some of the main contemporary research topics in marine and climate sciences.

    (LO2) Improve critical reading of scientific literature.

    (LO3) Gain/Practice Transferable Communication Skills: Communicating research topics and/or specific research papers (through oral presentations) to students and/or academic staff.

    (S1) research skills

    (S2) communication skills

  • Ocean Sciences Research Project (ENVS377)
    Level3
    Credit level30
    SemesterWhole Session
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To develop skills in all aspects of research in ocean sciences, including:

    literature searching, review and appraisal,

    design of experiments or models,

    practical and computing skills,

    collection and/or manipulation of data,

    construction of scientific hypotheses,

    oral communication and report writing.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Plan, organise and undertake a programme of research.

    (LO2) Make observations of data, reflect on outcomes and adjust the research design if necessary.

    (LO3) Interpret, critically evaluate and present the data.

    (LO4) Complete a scientific report of the research planned and undertaken

    (S1) Acquiring, analysing and assessing data

    (S2) Scientific writing

    (S3) Communicating results

  • Carbon, Nutrients and Climate Change Mitigation (ENVS381)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module aims to provide students with a quantitative understanding to examine the interlinkages between carbon, nutrients, water and climate change mitigation. The module aims to develop and demonstrate core knowledge and skills in this specialised area of climate change. The module will provide students with the skills to apply this knowledge quantitatively, critically evaluate scientific positions on topics of debate regarding climate change, and provide opportunities to develop skills in scientific communication and outreach to the scientific and general public. The module is built around the University’s core values of Active Learning, Research-Connected Learning, Authentic Assessment and Digital Fluency.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge of theory regarding carbon, nutrients and climate change mitigation strategies.

    (LO2) Ability to critically and quantitatively determine the importance of carbon and nutrient cycling to ecosystems.

    (LO3) Ability to communicate the theory and skills developed in this module in scientific and public forums.

    (S1) Quantitative assessment of ecosystem carbon and nutrient cycling.

    (S2) Science communication in public and scientific forums.

    (S3) Ability to work individually and in a group.

Year Three Optional Modules

  • Ocean Dynamics (ENVS332)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    To gain a high level understanding of ocean and atmospheric dynamics:

    To understand the background state of the atmosphere and ocean;

    To address how tracers spread;

    To understand the effects of rotation and how jets and eddies form on a rotating planet;

    To understand how waves influence and interact with the ocean circulation;

    To understand why there are western boundary currents and gyres in ocean basins;

    To understand how topography shapes the deep ocean circulation over the globe.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Students will acquire knowledge of key concepts in ocean and atmosphere dynamics.

    (LO2) Students will learn to appreciate the approximate nature of theoretical ideas, and the strengths and weaknesses of such ideas as explanations of observed phenomena.

    (LO3) Students will develop mathematical skills in scale analysis of differential equations to isolate the essential phenomena.

    (LO4) Students will acquire experience in combining quantitative and qualitative understanding of dynamics to give clear explanations of observed phenomena in the ocean and atmosphere.

    (LO5) Students will develop an understanding of the factors controllng fluid flows on a range of rotating planets.

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

  • Coastal Environments: Spatial and Temporal Change (ENVS376)
    Level3
    Credit level15
    SemesterFirst Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
    Aims

    This module aims to consider the response of physical processes and coastal environments to changes in sea-level and climate. Attention is given to the geomorphology of coastal environments, its response to external agents, as well as to possible coastal management strategies. The module aims at proving students with knowledge and understanding of the physical processes acting along coastal areas, and to promote students capability to critically understand pros and cons of different management techniques in relation to future climate change.

    Learning Outcomes

    (LO1) Knowledge and understanding of physical aspects of coastal environments

    (LO2) Knowledge and understanding of the concept of spatial and temporal variation: physical processes and landforms, and the importance of spatial and temporal scales

    (LO3) Knowledge and understanding of environments as a result of process and form interaction

    (LO4) Knowledge and understanding of methodologies of analysis and interpretation

    (LO5) Development of an informed concern for the Earth and its people

    (LO6) Capability to critically analyze real case studies in the context of previously acquired knowledge

    (S1) Problem solving skills

    (S2) Numeracy

    (S3) Communication skills

    (S4) Organisational skills

The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative only and subject to change.


Teaching and Learning

Teaching takes place through lectures, practicals, workshops, seminars, tutorials and computer based learning, with an emphasis on learning through doing. The award-winning £23 million Central Teaching Laboratories provides a state-of-the-art facility for undergraduate practical work.

Students value the learning opportunities provided by field classes, including the rapid feedback on performance. You will typically receive at least 15 hours of formal teaching each week. Between 30 and 100 hours of fieldwork and hands-on activities are provided each year depending on the discipline.

A typical module might involve two or three one-hour lectures each week, and often a three- hour laboratory or computer-based practical as well. Tutorials typically involve groups of 4-7 students meeting with a member of staff at least every two weeks in Year One and Two. In Year Three, you will undertake an Honours project, which is a piece of independent research (field, laboratory or data analysis) on a topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff. In Years Three and Four students meet with their project supervisor on a weekly or more frequent basis. As you progress through your degree, you will be increasingly challenged to engage with current debates, to think critically and to study independently.

A number of the School’s degree programmes involve laboratory and field work. The field work is carried out in various locations, ranging from inner city to coastal and mountainous environments. We consider applications from prospective students with disabilities on the same basis as all other students, and reasonable adjustments will be considered to address barriers to access.