Urban Regeneration and Management MSc Add to your prospectus

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2018
  • Entry requirements: You will normally need a good 2:1 degree or equivalent in a related area. Applications from those with non traditional qualifications and relevant work experience are also welcomed and will be considered on their individual merits.
Urban Regeneration and Management msc

Module details

Compulsory modules

Urban and Regional Regeneration (ENVS536)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims
  1. To critically understand the theory and practice of urban and regional regeneration;
  2. To examine the development of urban and regional regeneration policies and their relationship to the changing policy context;
  3. To critically examine the components of regeneration policies and practice, including the role of partnerships and agencies, and skills and management processes;
  4. To critically assess the wide variety of approaches to and policy instrument in urban regeneration that have been developed to date, including area and community based approaches and the benefits / dis-benefits of such approaches;
  5. To reflect on the nature of regeneration issues (including physical / environmental, economic and community) and the different ways in which public policies and programmes are effectively being applied to them at different spatial levels; and
  6. To identify and subsequently assess the nature of performance monitoring and evaluation processes for urban regeneration, and to critique their effectiveness.

 

Learning Outcomes

Be able to critically reflect on the ways in which urban regeneration policy has developed, how this may differ from previous urban policy interventions and the rationale / ‘drivers’ behind the variety of approaches adopted by the government;

Assess the nature and importance of the differing components of regeneration, including financial and human resources, partnerships and agencies, and their relative influence in shaping effective processes of urban and regional regeneration​

Be able to apply their knowledge to understand the different spatial levels of regeneration policies and how and why such ‘levels’ may be utilized in practice​

​Have a critical understanding of the issues in urban regeneration policy and practice, including the evaluation and impact of regeneration programmes​

Comparative Local Government (ULMS525)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to introduce students to the core themes and institutions of local governance. Through this comparative study students will obtain a wider appreciation of local governance arrangements and will be receptive to critiques and alternative perspectives of local governance arrangements in their own countries.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of the module, students will:

  • Understand the nature of local government within a comparative framework.
  • Understand the relationship between local and regional government.
  • Understand the pressures for institutional reform in local government.
  • Understand the notion and development of local governance.
  • Be able to draw on the studies to evaluate local governance widely and specifically in relation to their own countries.
Urban and Regional Regeneration Project (ENVS584)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide students within an opportunity to gain practical experience in the field of urban regeneration to develop their capacity to research and synthesise of variety of primary/secondary data sources to formulate effective policy and investment responses in relation to a specific aspect of urban regeneration.

Learning Outcomes

1. Be able to demonstrate advanced skills in selecting, assembling, manipulating, presenting, analysing and interpreting data related to plans and programmes for urban regeneration.

2. Be able to formulate policy responses in relation to specific aspects of urban regeneration to a professional standard.​

3. Be able to critically assess and evaluate aspects of existing plans, policy and practice.​

Public Finance (ULMS782)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the role of finance in public sector management. It considers the context within which public sector financial management systems have evolved and examines their limitations. Students will develop their understanding of the fundamentals of budgeting and accounting and how these can be tools for decision-making, planning and control. Other key elements of public finance, such as pricing, costing, audit and performance measurement will also be examined.

Learning Outcomes

Students completing the module will:

1. Understand the place of finance in contemporary financial management.

2. Gain a practical understanding of the basic principle of budgeting and accounting in the public sector.

3. Have a practical awareness of how these techniques may be used for decision-making and planning as well as control.

4. Be able to interpret and analyse financial information for specific purposes.

5. Be aware of the relationship between financial systems and general managerial systems and structures in the public sector environment.

Dissertation Mcd/ma/msc Planning (ENVS491)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterSummer (June-September)
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims


This module aims to introduce students to research and how to start a research project on a selected planning research topic. There are three main objectives:

  1. To give students an opportunity to study a subject of their choosing and develop a masterly understanding of the subject area;
  2. To develop techniques which will improve research skills in problem definition, information collection, analysis, synthesis, and reasoned argument;
  3. To develop individual initiative and judgement; and
  4. To develop writing and other communication skills of research findings.
Learning Outcomes

Students who complete the course successfully will:

  1. Develop substantive knowledge of a planning related research topic.

2. Understand the methodological steps involved in the research process of doing a dissertation.

3. Be able to set up and manage a research project

4. Grasp the nature and techniques of applying different research strategies and data collection and analytical methods

5. Be able to synthesize different information sources to form coherent arguments and relate research findings to planning policy and practice.

6. Be able to write a substantial piece of academic work and use bibliographies,referencing, citations and quotations in the appropriate and correct manner.

​7. Understand the ethical issues involved in research.

Optional modules

Spatial Planning Challenges (ENVS411)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the conflicts facing planners in trying to deliver sustainable development. It is a module which looks at policy issues and responses at a variety of different spatial scales. Five main objectives are identified:

1. To introduce students to the range of social and economic issues that face contemporary society in relation to accessing basic needs including, housing, employment and transport;

2. To introduce students to the need for planning to protect our natural resources from development pressures (including landscape, biodiversity, water, energy, waste, etc.);

3. To introduce the concept of sustainable development with the need to balance social, economic and environmental concerns;

4. To develop the idea that contemporary problems are often rooted in past decisions;

5. To introduce students to the range of planning policy responses designed to address these competing interests.

Learning Outcomes

1. demonstrate an understanding of the many faceted competing uses and demands placed on planners trying to deliver sustainable development;

​2. demonstrate the way that different issues concern different groups in different spatial locations;

​3. demonstrate the different planning interventions designed to improve people''s quality of life.

Theory, Power & Ethics (ENVS432)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
Aims

Disclaimer: Information correct at time of publication. Students should refer to the Student Spider Web for changes to Module Specifications and the Civic Design webpage www.liv.ac.uk/civicdesign for current Programme Structures.  Planned programme structure subject to Faculty approval. Students will be notified of any major changes to the Programme Structure by email.

The aim of this module is to provide the context and conception of planning as a professional activity.  It examines the institutional perspective on planning activities in relation to politics and markets and explores different strands of theories on the nature and purposes of planning. There are a number of specific objectives:

1. To provide a theoretical grounding on the nature and purposes of planning activities and planning practice;

2. To introduce planning as a political as well as an administrative and technical process;

3. To identify the range of different stakeholders involved in the planning process and their inter-relationships;

4. To relate theories about planning to more general social theories of the state, society and professional ethics; and

5. To provide a conceptual framework for students to formulate their own professional value-systems and viewpoints.
Learning Outcomes

1. appreciate a range of different theoretical backgrounds to planning, both historical and contemporary;




2. understand the diversity of ideologies, values and cultures that form different theories in and of planning;​

3. understand the reasons why planning practitioners operate in the way they do;​

​4. 

have a rounded understanding of the institutional and political structures within which planning operates; and​

5. develop the ability to formulate their own professional values and attitudes.​
Making Places (ENVS439)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim of this module is to outline the history, theories and practice of urban design as the principal means of creating and protecting the quality of ‘place’ in the urban fabric.  It teaches the basic techniques and skills required to achieve an understanding the character and quality of places, including the key components of urban form and the main theories behind place-making.  It also deals with the influence of the property market and the participants in the development process on the character and quality of the urban fabric.  

The specific objectives of the module are to:

- introduce students to the analysis of  the qualities and characteristics of the built environment

- introduce the different approaches to appreciating the visual qualities of urban space

- outline the development process as it affects urban design and the techniques of development appraisal as they apply to a specific project

- appreciate the relationship between urban design and the planning aims and policies in legislation and practice

- develop the formative design skills and techniques related to site planning

Learning Outcomes Have the ability to appraise the qualities of an area in design terms    

 

Understand the processes producing and changing urban areastoday

​Understand the issues around and a basic knowledge of site planning and design

​​Have the ability to undertake basic site planning, including forming open space and buildings

Be conversant with basic design and presentation techniques

 

Be conversant with models of development and funding

​Have the ability to understand and undertake a basic valuation appraisal of a development project

Trends, Outcomes and Impacts (ENVS469)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to provide students with a coherent guide to the variety of methods and techniques employed in analysing contemporary spatial planning issues and monitoring and evaluating policy outcomes and impacts. Four main objectives are identified:

  1. To enhance the understanding of trends and spatial patterns of development to provide a context to policy-making;
  2. To introduce diagnostic analysis and projections so as to establish the causal and inter-relationship between different factors and activities to assist problem definition, and to predict and estimate future levels of activities under different assumptions and scenarios;
  3. To learn various methodologies involved in carrying out policy monitoring and evaluation to assess the outputs and outcomes of policy action;
  4. To make use of on-line databases and information technology to analyse and present analytical findings.
Learning Outcomes

​appreciate the usefulness, as well as the limitations, of such techniques and methods under different contexts

​have the ability to manage and perform basic analysis with such methods and techniques in relation to spatial planning-related work

Urban Design & Regeneration (ENVS512)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims 


 

 Students should develop:

  • a detailed appreciation of the nature and structure of urban space;
  • knowledge of the principal design approaches used to create good urban environments;
  • a detailed understanding of contemporary techniques used by urban designers;
  • the ability to appreciate and evaluate the quality of urban design proposals; and
  • the range of analytical, design and presentational skills required for urban design projects.
 
Learning Outcomes

- be able to appraise the qualities and character of an area in urban design terms

​- have a good knowledge of site planning and design issues and how they can be resolved; 

 

- ​have an understanding of contemporary theories and issues as they relate to urban design;  

·         

- have undertaken a realistic project  to help regenerate an area using urban design proposals; and

- understand what constitutes successful urban design and how it can be achieved.

Environmental Assessment of Policies, Plans, Programmes and Projects (ENVS529)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims

This module provides for a comprehensive overview of the theory and practice of strategic environmental assessment of policies, plans and programmes and of environmental impact assessment of projects.


Learning Outcomes1. Understand why and how EIA and SEA are important to further an environmentally sustainable development and influence policy/practice;

2. Have a clear understanding of SEA and EIA requirements and practices;

​3. Know how to collect, analyse and report environmental information and data in SEA and EIA;

​4. Be able to analyse environmental problems effectively and choose suitable assessment tools, methods and techniques;

​​5. Be able to communicate effectively in (and on) SEA and EIA processes.

Geographic Data Science (ENVS563)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

  1. The module provides students with core competences in Geographic Data Science (GDS). Thisincludes the following:

    • Advancing their statistical and numerical literacy.

    • Introducing basic principles of programming and state-of-the-art computational tools for

      GDS.

    • Presenting a comprehensive overview of the main methodologies available to the Geographic

      Data Scientist, as well as their intuition as to how and when they can be applied.

    • Focusing on real world applications of these techniques in a geographical and applied

      context.

Learning OutcomesDemonstrate advanced GIS/GDS concepts and be able to use the tools programmaticallyto import, manipulate and analyse data in different formats.Understand the motivation and inner workings of the main methodological approcahes ofGDS, both analytical and visual.Critically evaluate the suitability of a specific technique, what it can offer and how it canhelp answer questions of interest.Apply a number of spatial analysis techniques and how to interpret the results, in theprocess of turning data into information.

​When faced with a new data-set, work independently using GIS/GDS tools programmatically.

Culture, Economy and Cities (SOCI327)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims
  • Introduce key theories and concepts regarding the interaction between cultural and economic forces within the city

  • Explain the current position of culture within political, economic and urban spheres by tracing their shifting historical inter-relation

  • Reveal the links between urban, economic and cultural development​

  • Learning Outcomes

    Understand the changing relationship between economic organisation and cultural activity

    Engage with, and critique, key theories regarding the role of culture in contemporary cities​

    Critically assess a range of theoretical accounts of the cultural economy​

    Gain an awareness of changes in cultural policy up to the present day, and appreciate the socioeconomic backdrop to these policies​

    Understand the fundamentally social nature of cultural production and consumption​

    Implementing and Managing Change (ENVS459)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    Disclaimer: Information correct at time of publication. Students should refer to the Student Spider Web for changes to Module Specifications and the Civic Design webpage www.liv.ac.uk/civicdesign for current Programme Structures.  Planned programme structure subject to Faculty approval. Students will be notified of any major changes to the Programme Structure by email.

    This module aims to introduce and critically examine the key skills,issues and practices planners need in implementing and managing change.

    Objectives:

    1. To develop an understanding of the basic features of the planning system and the changes, challenges and issues planners face in mediating, regulating and managing change.
    2. To develop the skills necessary to maximise the effectiveness of planners and planning  – and to develop an appreciation of how to critically apply them and to take into account the needs and responsibilities of all who are involved in the planning system.
    3. To develop a critical appreciation of the nature of change and development and its funding and implementation at a range of different levels – from global to local.
    4.  To develop an understanding of the planner as a professional practitioner and the responsibilities this entails.
    5. To maximise student’s employability and awareness of potential careers and provide advice on managing their careers.
    Learning Outcomes

    On completion students will understand and appreciate the statutory and practical basis of spatial planning and ‘the planners toolkit’.

    ​Students will appreciate the need and requirement to develop and appraise effective, collaborative and integrative approaches to spatial planning – from global to local.

    ​Students will understand and appreciate the importance of, and  be able to work effectively with, communities and stakeholders.

    ​Students will appreciate  the underlying importance of professional values, ethics, morality and, standards in the work you do – and be able to enhance your employability and career management.​

    Social and Spatial Inequalities (ENVS557)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    ·       Gain anunderstanding of several core areas of social and spatial inequalities and howthese inter-relate, and to engage with academic debates about these issues

    ·       Explore evidencefor, and interpretations of, social and spatial inequalities (eg labour market,ethnic, spatial aspects of poverty)

    ·       Gain anunderstanding of the geographies of social inequalities, including whyinequalities are not equal between places, and what the implications of thisunevenness are for individuals and communities

    ·       ​Consider howand why social inequalities have persisted and/or changed over time, withreference to allied theories and empirical evidence

    ·       Gain acritical understanding of the meaning and measurement of inequalities, povertyand deprivation

    ·       Identify andreview the types of data sources that can be used to explore social and spatialinequalities​

    ·       Explore thewider UK context for the development of social and spatial inequalities,including economic restructuring and welfare reform​

    ·       Considerrepresentations of inequalities in the media, policy and political debate

    ·       Consider anumber of policy developments/responses to problems of social and spatialinequalities, and to highlight their impact​

    Learning Outcomes

    ​Develop anunderstanding of social and spatial inequalities, how these inter-relate, andhow the terms have been (mis-)used in academic, political, policy and public discourses​

    Develop anunderstanding of how and why social and spatial inequalities might havepersisted over time, and review the empirical evidence for this

     ​

    ​Understand how and why social inequalities havespecific geographies and can be concentrated in particular areas orneighbourhoods​​Understand the difficulties in defining andmeasuring social and spatial inequalities, and how such definitions may relateto broader theories, perspectives or frameworks of relevance​

    ​Gain insightinto a range of government responses that have been developed to combat socialinequalities and related issues in the UK, at the regional and sub-regionallevel ​​

    Social Enterprise (ULMS527)
    LevelM
    Credit level15
    SemesterSecond Semester
    Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
    Aims

    This module will introduce students to social enterprise.  It will explore the public policy context in which the idea of social enterprises has emerged in recent years and consider different understandings of their purpose.  The module will also consider the different governance challenges they present.  The changing legal and financial contexts within which they operate will be discussed.  Case studies will be used throughout to illustrate the varieties of ways in which these challenges are addressed.

    Learning Outcomes

    Demonstrate an understanding of the different understandings of social enterprise. 

    ​Critically review the policy, legal and financial environment in which social enterprises operate.

    ​Analyse the managerial challenges social enterprises present.

    ​Evaluate the utility of the social enterprise model.