History: Twentieth-Century History MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: October 2020
  • Entry requirements: You should normally have a BA in History or a related discipline (2:1 or above, or international equivalent).

Module details

Compulsory modules

Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History 1 (HIST503)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to encourage students to familiarise themselves with what happened during roughly the first half of the hundred years of the twentieth century and consider the extent to which the century can be seen as a discrete period or series of periods, and, if so, how that period (or those periods) might be characterised. It also invites students to familiarise themselves with some of the concepts that have been developed by historians and social scientists to understand it. Was it, for example, the century of the battle of ideologies of Left and Right as Hobsbawm argues, or was democracy, as Mazower suggests, altogether more fragile and rarely achieved throughout its course?

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students who take this module should develop: a good knowledge of the principal developments (political, economic and social) in roughly the first half of the twentieth century history.

(LO2) Students will be familiar with the major debates in the relevant historiography.

(LO3) Students will have the ability to work with primary sources.

(LO4) Students will gain ability to write detailed essays showing evidence of a deep understanding of the subject matter appropriate to study at the Masters level.

(S1) Improving learning performance.

(S2) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability.

(S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information.

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression.

Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History 2 (HIST512)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to encourage students to familiarise themselves with what happened during roughly the second half of the hundred years of the twentieth century and consider the extent to which the century can be seen as a discrete period or series of periods, and, if so, how that period (or those periods) might be characterised; The module invites students to familiarise themselves with some of the concepts that have been developed by historians and social scientists to understand it. Was it, for example, the century of the battle of ideologies of Left and Right as Hobsbawm argues, or was democracy, as Mazower suggests, altogether more fragile and rarely achieved throughout its course?

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students who take this module should develop: a good knowledge of the principal developments (political, economic and social) in roughly the second half of the twentieth century history.

(LO2) Students will be familiar with the major debates in the relevant historiography.

(LO3) Students will gain the ability to work with primary sources.

(LO4) Students will gain the ability to write detailed essays showing evidence of a deep understanding of the subject matter appropriate to study at the Masters level.

(S1) Improving learning performance

(S2) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

Feasibility Study (HIST504)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The feasibility study is designed to ensure that the topic chosen for the dissertation can be undertaken successfully;

Students will embark on the dissertation with a clear idea of the secondary and primary sources to be consulted;

Students will be aware of the appropriate theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches to be deployed.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have tested the feasibility of the project defined the scope of study and the way the research may be carried out.

(LO2) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the pathway / MA programme.

(LO3) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO4) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO5) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(LO6)  Enhancement of research skills through theprocess of devising an independent research project, defining the scope ofstudy and planning how the research will be carried out.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

(S4) Time and project management - Project planning

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

(S6) Information skills - Critical reading

(S7) Research skills - All Information skills

(S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

(S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Flexibility/Adaptability

Dissertation (HIST550)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To enable the student to complete a piece of original research drawing on relevant primary and secondary source material to publishable standard.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The ability to identify a genuine professional or historical problem or issue, and successfully describe its nature and scope

(LO2) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the pathway/MA programme

(LO3) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO4) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO5) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO6) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form.

(LO7) An ability to demonstrate self-direction and originality in undertaking a piece of independent research culminating in the writing of a dissertation

(LO8) The ability to present a major piece of independent work showing clarity of structure and style and in accordance with appropriate presentation guidelines

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

(S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

(S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

Optional modules

Contemporary Anti-slavery, Forced Labour and Human Rights (POLI150)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students’ familiarity with contemporary examples of human exploitation analogous with slavery;

To develop students’ analysis of current practice and assist them in drawing reasoned conclusions for future action ;

To contribute to the process of developing anti-slavery and anti-trafficking strategies, amongst governments and NGOs, and raising awareness of issues related to their development .

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Analyse theoretical approaches to contemporary forms of ‘slavery’ and human exploitation.

(LO2) Evaluate the role of scholarly concepts, rhetorical analogies, legal definitions and national or international legislation in identifying and eliminating forms of modern ‘slavery’.

(LO3) Formulate conclusions regarding the role of current practice and the potential for future development in a specific area of voluntary, legislative or enforcement efforts to end contemporary ‘slaveries’.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

Themes in History (HIST590)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to provide students with knowledge of a wide range of theoretical, conceptual and methodological themes in History;

The module seeks to meet the requirements of Masters level provision in History by familiarising students with cutting-edge research, offered both by historians within the History department and elsewhere in the University;

In addition, the module seeks to support a wider agenda for research in History by connecting Masters students to the research community of historians at Liverpool, broadly defined, including our numerous Research Centres (Centre for the Study of International Slavery, the Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Worlds) as well as the work of historians in the Departments of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, in the Department of Public Health and Policy, or the Department of Sociology.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the module.

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience.

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(S1) Organisational skills

(S2) Adaptability

(S3) Communication skills

(S4) International awareness

Narrative Interviewing (SOCI524)
LevelM
Credit level5
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

• To introduce the student to the theoretical and analytical principles of narrative research

• To provide students with the technical skills for conducting, transcribing and analysing narrative interviews

• To understand the contributions and limitations of using narrative inquiry in social science research

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Distinguish between story, narrative and biographical forms of research.

(LO2) Demonstrate an understanding of the specific contributions narrative research makes to different disciplinary modes of inquiry in the social sciences

(LO3) Plan a narrative interview, and use at least one technique of analysis

(LO4) Show a grasp of a variety of modes of representing and writing up narrative research

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

Using Foucault's Methods (SOCI515)
LevelM
Credit level5
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

• To introduce students to Foucault’s use of history as a method

• To demonstrate the use of Foucault’s method of discourse as an effective tool of social inquiry

• To provide an introduction to Foucault’s method in relation to his work on sexuality, discipline and docile bodies as an example of the sociological imagination

• To understand how, when and why Foucault’s methods have been taken up in the social sciences.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To demonstrate an understanding of Foucault’s use of history as a method

(LO2) To demonstrate an understanding of the role of discourse in addressing the relations between discourse and context, discourse and power and discourse and interaction

(LO3) To explain the link between Foucault’s method and the study of culture and society

(LO4) To apply Foucault’s methods to social research and social inquiry in the social sciences

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

Using Surveys and Statistics to Understand Social Attitudes (SOCI514)
LevelM
Credit level5
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To give students practical experience in analysing real survey data using applied statistics and software

To enable students to understand implications, assumptions and caveats of applied survey data analysis and regression

To develop and enhance students’ skills in applied statistics and regression using survey data and software

To develop and enhance students skills to critically analyse and interpret data on population attitudes and statistical outputs from regression

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Ability to critically evaluate and discuss comparative research using applied statistics

(LO2) Ability to carry out bivariate statistics using software and interpret the findings

(LO3) Ability to carry out a multiple regression analysis using software and interpret the findings

(LO4) Awareness of caveats using the learned techniques

(LO5) Ability to design a short piece of research using the techniques learned in the module

(S1) Numeracy

(S2) Problem solving skills

Oral History: Theory and Practice (HIST602)
LevelM
Credit level5
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide students with a broad, yet in-depth understanding of the theory of Oral History;

To provide students with an understanding of how Oral Histories are constructed and affected by both interviewee and interviewer;

To provide students with a firm sense of how Oral History might be applied as a core research methodology;

To give students a working knowledge of how they might obtain historical data through interviews, the problems that this might entail, and how these problems might be overcome / addressed;

To provide students with an in-depth consideration of the ethical issues involved with interviewing historical subjects.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To have an understanding of the development of history as a discipline: the complexity of reconstructing the past, including the problematic and varied nature of historical evidence; and different historical methodologies, comprising a variety of approaches to understanding, constructing and interpreting the past.

(LO2) To be able to examine critically traditions and practices of oral history

(LO3) To be able to design, research and present a sustained and independently-conceived piece of historical writing.

(LO4) To be able to design and conduct interviews for generating historical data.

(LO5) To be able to analyse oral records historically.

(S1) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S2) Gathering, analysing and organising information

(S3) Problem solving, exchanging information and decision-making skills

(S4) Listening, questioning and creative thinking

(S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

Historical Research (HIST527)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To be able to identify theories and concepts from the social sciences, or from literary or gender studies, as appropriate to their subsequent dissertation work;

In addition, graduate students of history need to develop a broad understanding of the nature of the primary sources available to historians in their chosen fields of study, and the range of methodological approaches used in interrogating these primary sources;

This module addresses the location of primary sources and their accessibility, the various strategies devised by historians for analysing them, and the ethical issues raised in the pursuit of historical research. It is designed to enable you to identify, where appropriate, a range of primary sources relating to the field of your proposed dissertation topic in Semester two.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO2) Show an understanding of the issues faced by historians when using primary sources.

(LO3) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(LO4) Critically evaluate historians’ use of theory in framing research questions.

(LO5) Show an understanding of the sources and methodological approach(es) appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO6) Show an awareness of ethical issues in historical research.

(LO7) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(S1) Confidence, independence of mind and time-management

(S2) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S3) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

Historical Research (HIST507)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To be able to identify theories and concepts from the social sciences, or from literary or gender studies, as appropriate to their subsequent dissertation work. In addition, graduate students of history need to develop a broad understanding of the nature of the primary sources available to historians in their chosen fields of study, and the range of methodological approaches used in interrogating these primary sources. This module addresses the location of primary sources and their accessibility, the various strategies devised by historians for analysing them, and the ethical issues raised in the pursuit of historical research. It is designed to enable you to identify, where appropriate, a range of primary sources relating to the field of your proposed dissertation topic in Semester two.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO2) Show an understanding of the issues faced by historians when using primary sources.

(LO3) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(LO4) Critically evaluate historians’ use of theory in framing research questions.

(LO5) Show an understanding of the sources and methodological approach(es) appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO6) Show an awareness of ethical issues in historical research

(LO7) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form.

(S1) Confidence, independence of mind and time-management

(S2) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S3) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression


In addition, students must opt for either Pathway A or Pathway B in Semester 1 as follows:

Pathway 1:

Historical Research (HIST527) [ + more ]

Pathway 2

Historical Research (HIST507) [ + more ]

Please note that the modules listed are representative of those you’ll study and are subject to change.

Further details about the content of individual modules can be provided on request.