Town and Regional Planning M/CD

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2020
  • Entry requirements: A 2:1 degree in a related subject, such as Planning, Architecture, Civil Engineering, Geography, Economics. Applications with non traditional qualifications and relevant work experience are also welcome and will be considered on individual merit.
Town and Regional Planning mcd

Module details

Pathway A - Spatial Planning

For the Spatial Planning pathway, the area of specialised study is spatial plan-making. This is reflected in the ENVS427 Making Plans, ENVS439 Making Places, ENVS469 Trends, Outcomes and Impacts modules and especially ENVS467 Spatial Planning in Action, which builds upon the foundation that is laid in the other modules. Students are able to deepen their knowledge of a particular aspect of spatial planning in the 60 credit dissertation, ENVS491. The dissertation draws on the knowledge, understanding and interests developed elsewhere in the programme. It can take the form of either a conventional research-based dissertation or, exceptionally, a client-oriented project that is placement-linked.

Semester One

ENVS411: Spatial Planning Challenges(15 credits)
ENVS432: Theory, Power and Ethics (15 credits)
ENVS439: Making Places (15 Credits)
ENVS469: Trends, Outcomes and Impacts (15 Credits)

Semester Two

ENVS459: Implementing and Managing Change (15 credits)
ENVS427: Making Plans (15 credits)
ENVS467: Spatial Planning in Action (30 credits)

Summer

ENVS491: Dissertation (60 Credits)


Programme Structure Part Time

Year One

Semester One

ENVS411: Spatial Planning Challenges (15 Credits)
ENVS469: Trends, Outcomes and Impacts (15 Credits)

Semester Two

ENVS427: Making Plans (15 Credits)
ENVS459: Implementing and Managing Change (15 Credits)

Year Two

Semester One

ENVS432: Theory, Power and Ethics (15 Credits)
ENVS439: Making Places (15 Credits)

Semester Two

ENVS467: Spatial Planning in Action (30 Credits)

Summer

ENVS491: Dissertation (60 Credits)


Pathway B - Urban Design

A key feature of the Urban Design pathway is the area of specialised study in this field, as reflected in ENVS420 Advanced Urban Design 1 and ENVS463 Advanced Urban Design 2. The 60 credit dissertation, ENVS491, provides a further opportunity to develop specialist study in Urban Design. The dissertation may take the form either of a design-based project or a more conventional research-based dissertation.

Semester One

ENVS411: Spatial Planning Challenges (15 Credits)
ENVS420: Advanced Urban Design 1 (15 Credits)
ENVS432: Theory, Power and Ethics (15 Credits)
ENVS469: Trends, Outcomes and Impacts (15 Credits)

Semester Two

ENVS459: Implementing and Managing Change (15 Credits)
ENVS463: Advanced Urban Design 2 (15 Credits)
ENVS467: Spatial Planning in Action (30 Credits)

Summer

Dissertation (60 Credits)


Pathway C - Spatial Analysis

A key feature of the Spatial Modelling pathway is the area of specialised study in this field, as reflected in ENVS453 Spatial Analysis and ENVS609 Geographic Information Science. The 60 credit dissertation, ENVS491, provides a further opportunity to develop the specialist study in Spatial Modelling. The dissertation may take the form either of a quantitative spatial analysis project or a more conventional research-based dissertation.

Semester One

ENVS411: Spatial Planning Challenges (15 Credits)
ENVS432: Theory, Power and Ethics (15 Credits)
ENVS609: Geographic Information Science* (15 Credits)

Semester Two

ENVS453: Spatial Analysis (15 Credits)
ENVS459: Implementing and Managing Change (15 Credits)
ENVS467: Spatial Planning in Action (30 Credits)

Summer

ENVS491: Dissertation (60 Credits)

*If an equivalent to ENVS609 has been taken as part of a first degree then ENVS609 may be replaced by ENVS563 Geographic Data Science subject to approval by the Programme Director.

Compulsory modules

Spatial Planning Challenges (ENVS411)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:80
Aims

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the conflicts facing planners in trying to deliver sustainable development. It is a module which looks at policy issues and responses at a variety of different spatial scales. Five main objectives are identified:

One. To introduce students to the range of social and economic issues that face contemporary society in relation to accessing basic needs including, housing, employment and transport;

Two. To introduce students to the need for planning to protect our natural resources from development pressures (including landscape, biodiversity, water, energy, waste, etc.);

Three. To introduce the concept of sustainable development with the need to balance social, economic and environmental concerns;

Four. To develop the idea that contemporary problems are often rooted in past decisions;

Five. To introduce students to the range of planning policy responses designed to address these competing interests.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) 1. demonstrate an understanding of the many faceted competing uses and demands placed on planners trying to deliver sustainable development;

(LO2) 2. demonstrate the way that different issues concern different groups in different spatial locations;

(LO3) 3. demonstrate the different planning interventions designed to improve people's quality of life.

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Communication skills

(S3) Adaptability

(S4) Organisational skills

Theory, Power & Ethics (ENVS432)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
Aims

The aim of this module is to provide the context and conception of planning as a professional activity.  It examines the institutional perspective on planning activities in relation to politics and markets and explores different strands of theories on the nature and purposes of planning.
There are a number of specific objectives:
1. To provide a theoretical grounding on the nature and purposes of planning activities and planning practice;
2. To introduce planning as a political as well as an administrative and technical process;
3. To identify the range of different stakeholders involved in the planning process and their inter-relationships;
4. To relate theories about planning to more general social theories of the state, society and professional ethics;
and 5. To provide a conceptual framework for students to formulate their own professional value-systems and viewpoints.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) 1. appreciate a range of different theoretical backgrounds to planning, both historical and contemporary;

(LO2) 2 . understand the diversity of ideologies, values and cultures that form different theories in and of  planning;

(LO3) 3. understand the reasons why planning practitioners operate in the way they do;

(LO4) 4. have a rounded understanding of the institutional and political structures within which planning operates; and

(LO5) 5. develop the ability to formulate their own professional values and attitudes.

(S1) Communication skills

(S2) Ethical awareness

(S3) Lifelong learning skills

Implementing and Managing Change (ENVS459)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to introduce and critically examine the key skills, issues and practices planners need in implementing and managing change.

Objectives: To develop an understanding of the basic features of the planning system and the changes, challenges and issues planners face in mediating, regulating and managing change;
To develop the skills necessary to maximise the effectiveness of planners and planning – and to develop an appreciation of how to critically apply them and to take into account the needs and responsibilities of all who are involved in the planning system;
To develop a critical appreciation of the nature of change and development and its funding and implementation at a range of different levels – from global to local;
To develop an understanding of the planner as a professional practitioner and the responsibilities this entails;
To maximise student’s employability and awareness of potential careers and provide advice on managing their careers.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) On completion students will understand and appreciate the statutory and practical basis of spatial planning and ‘the planners toolkit’.

(LO2) Students will appreciate the need and requirement to develop and appraise effective, collaborative and integrative approaches to spatial planning – from global to local.

(LO3) Students will understand and appreciate the importance of, and  be able to work effectively with, communities and stakeholders.

(LO4) Students will appreciate  the underlying importance of professional values, ethics, morality and, standards in the work you do – and be able to enhance your employability and career management.

(S1) Understanding administrative processes

(S2) Synthesizing complex policy documents

(S3) Working both individually and in a group

Trends, Outcomes and Impacts (ENVS469)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to provide students with a coherent guide to the variety of methods and techniques employed in analysing contemporary spatial planning issues and monitoring and evaluating policy outcomes and impacts. Four main objectives are identified: To enhance the understanding of trends and spatial patterns of development to provide a context to policy-making; To introduce diagnostic analysis and projections so as to establish the causal and inter-relationship between different factors and activities to assist problem definition, and to predict and estimate future levels of activities under different assumptions and scenarios; To learn various methodologies involved in carrying out policy monitoring and evaluation to assess the outputs and outcomes of policy action; To make use of on-line databases and information technology to analyse and present analytical findings.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) be familiar with the range of techniques and methods used to analyse, monitor and evaluate spatial planning issues and policy action and have a good grasp of the basic principles that underpin the application of these techniques and methods

(LO2) appreciate the usefulness, as well as the limitations, of such techniques and methods under different contexts

(LO3) have the ability to manage and perform basic analysis with such methods and techniques in relation to spatial planning-related work

(S1) Communication skills

(S2) Numeracy

(S3) IT skills

(S4) Problem solving skills

Spatial Planning in Action (ENVS467)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The purpose of this module is to engage students in a client related spatial plan making exercise, More specifically the project aims to Provide an opportunity for students to apply planning concepts and techniques in a practical context:            Enhance the capacity of students to identify, collect and synthesis a variety of relevant information from a variety of sources in relation to a spatial planning task; Evaluate spatial planning options and develop objectives and strategies which are realistic and implementable; Develop an awareness of the ethical and professional issues that confront planning consultants working for a client; Develop collaborative problem solving, project management and written, oral and graphic communication skills; Appreciate how similar issues are managed in different ways in other European countries.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) be able to demonstrate the application of theplanning concepts and techniques that have been studied in other modules in a practical context

(LO2) have a working understanding of aspects of the planmaking process

(LO3) be able to demonstrate engagement in a collaborative problem solving exercise which has culminated in a clear action plan

(LO4) be able to demonstrate a levelof competence in written, oral and graphic communication skills

(LO5)

(S1) Adaptability

(S2) Problem solving skills

(S3) Teamwork

(S4) Communication skills

Dissertation Mcd/ma/msc Planning (ENVS491)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterSummer (June-September)
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to introduce students to research and how to start a research project on a selected planning research topic. There are three main objectives: To give students an opportunity to study a subject of their choosing and develop a masterly understanding of the subject area; To develop techniques which will improve research skills in problem definition, information collection, analysis, synthesis, and reasoned argument; To develop individual initiative and judgement; and To develop writing and other communication skills of research findings.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students who complete the course successfully will: Develop substantive knowledge of a planning related research topic.

(LO2) 2. Understand the methodological steps involved in the research process of doing a dissertation.

(LO3) 3. Be able to set up and manage a research project

(LO4) 4. Grasp the nature and techniques of applying different research strategies and data collection and analytical methods

(LO5) 5. Be able to synthesize different information sources to form coherent arguments and relate research findings to planning policy and practice.

(LO6) 6. Be able to write a substantial piece of academic work and use bibliographies,referencing, citations and quotations in the appropriate and correct manner.

(LO7) 7. Understand the ethical issues involved in research.

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Organisational skills

(S3) Communication skills

(S4) Ethical awareness

Making Places (ENVS439)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim of this module is to outline the history, theories and practice of urban design as the principal means of creating and protecting the quality of ‘place’ in the urban fabric.  It teaches the basic techniques and skills required to achieve an understanding the character and quality of places, including the key components of urban form and the main theories behind place-making.  It also deals with the influence of the property market and the participants in the development process on the character and quality of the urban fabric.

The specific objectives of the module are to:
introduce students to the analysis of  the qualities and characteristics of the built environment;

introduce the different approaches to appreciating the visual qualities of urban space;

outline the development process as it affects urban design and the techniques of development appraisal as they apply to a specific project;

appreciate the relationship between urban design and the planning aims and policies in legislation and practice;

develop the formative design skills and techniques related to site planning.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Have the ability to appraise the qualities of an area in design terms

(LO2) Understand the processes producing and changing urban areastoday

(LO3) Understand the issues around and a basic knowledge of site planning and design

(LO4) Have the ability to undertake basic site planning, including forming open space and buildings

(LO5) Be conversant with basic design and presentation techniques

(LO6) Be conversant with models of development and funding

(LO7) Have the ability to understand and undertake a basic valuation appraisal of a development project

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Commercial awareness

(S3) Teamwork

(S4) Organisational skills

(S5) Communication skills

(S6) IT skills

Making Plans (ENVS427)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting60:40
Aims

The aim of this module is to provide students with an introduction to plan making and the different methods and techniques that are used in plan preparation.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) an understanding of the role of plans in shaping the development of places and how the theory of plan making has evolved over time

(LO2) familiarity with the main elements of the plan making process and techniques associated with them

(LO3) an appreciation of the range of current plans and an understanding of the different functions they serve;

(LO4)  a critical perspective on current plan formats

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Organisational skills

(S3) Ethical awareness

(S4) Adaptability

Advanced Urban Design 1 (ENVS420)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim of this module is to focus on the theory and practice of urban design as the principal means of delivering quality and sustainable urban environment. It builds on students’ basic design skills to achieve an understanding of character and quality, the key components of urban form and the main theories of urban design. It also deals with the influence of the property market and the participants in the development process on the character and quality of the urban fabric to enable students to develop their own sustainable approach to urban design practice.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understand how city form is shapedand transformed by socio-cultural, economic, political and ecological factors;

(LO2) Have a more in-depth knowledge of the nature ofpeople-environmental relations,  the idea of place, as well as the role ofurban designers in shaping urban form;

(LO3) Be aware of and understand the current debate onsustainable and desirable urban design practice;

(LO4) Build on previous knowledge of urban design anddesign and presentation techniques;

(LO5) Develop the ability to research and present anurban design topic, including a case study.

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Commercial awareness

(S3) Teamwork

(S4) Organisational skills

(S5) Communication skills

(S6) IT skills

(S7) Lifelong learning skills

Advanced Urban Design 2 (ENVS463)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim of this module is to enable students to interpret a design brief and propose a sustainable urban design solution to an urban design problem on a given site.

It will build on and develop students’ prior basic design skills for them to be able to apply the main theories of urban design and previous topic-based research. This will develop students’ design ability in preparation for practice and contribute to their own individual design portfolio.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students should develop their prior knowledge and skills of drawing techniques and the representation of space further

(LO2) Ability to undertake an urban design site analysis and apply to a proposal

(LO3) Ability to interpret and develop a design brief appropriately into a strategy and apply

(LO4) Demonstrate planning and design of development plots, buildings and open spaces

(LO5) Competent visualisation of a design proposal through drawing and modelling

(LO6) Ability to present an urban design proposal graphically and verbally

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Teamwork

(S3) Organisational skills

(S4) Communication skills

(S5) IT skills

Geographic Data Science (ENVS563)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module provides students with core competences in Geographic Data Science (GDS). This includes the following:

Advancing their statistical and numerical literacy;

Introducing basic principles of programming and state-of-the-art computational tools for GDS;

Presenting a comprehensive overview of the main methodologies available to the Geographic Data Scientist, as well as their intuition as to how and when they can be applied;

Focusing on real world applications of these techniques in a geographical and applied context.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate advanced GIS/GDS concepts and be able to use the tools programmaticallyto import, manipulate and analyse data in different formats.

(LO2) Understand the motivation and inner workings of the main methodological approcahes ofGDS, both analytical and visual.

(LO3) Critically evaluate the suitability of a specific technique, what it can offer and how it canhelp answer questions of interest.

(LO4) Apply a number of spatial analysis techniques and how to interpret the results, in theprocess of turning data into information.

(LO5) When faced with a new data-set, work independently using GIS/GDS tools programmatically.

(S1) Numeracy

(S2) Organisational skills

(S3) Problem solving skills

(S4) IT skills

(S5) Ethical awareness

(S6) Communication skills

Spatial Analysis (ENVS453)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Build upon the more general researchtraining delivered via companion modules on Data Collection and Data Analysis, both of which have an aspatial focus;      
Highlight a number of key socialissues that have a spatial dimension;
Explain the specific challenges facedwhen attempting to analyse spatial data;
Introduce a range of analyticaltechniques and approaches suitable for the analysis of spatial data;  
Enhancepractical skills in using software packages to implement a wide range of spatial analytical tools.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Identify some key sources of spatial data andresources of spatial analysis and modelling tools

(LO2) Explain the advantages of taking spatial structure intoaccount when analysing spatial data

(LO3) Apply a range of computer-based techniques for theanalysis of spatial data, including mapping, correlation, kernel densityestimation, regression, multi-level models, geographically-weighted regression,spatial interaction models and spatial econometrics

(LO4) Select appropriate analytical tools for analysingspecific spatial data sets to address emerging social issues facing the society

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Numeracy

(S3) IT skills