Thoroughbred Horseracing Industries MBA

  • Programme duration:   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2020
  • Entry requirements: MBA Candidates are normally expected to have a minimum of 3 years of substantive managerial experience in the private or public sector.

Module details

The specialist horseracing modules are delivered face-to-face and the core business and management modules are delivered online.

 

Compulsory modules

International Horseracing Industries (ULMS618)
Level2
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to enable students to:

Develop an understanding of horseracing and its associated industries;

Identify, understand and analyse the distinct stakeholders in horseracing;

Assess critically the range of business models that exist across different horseracing jurisdictions;

Review critically the current state of horseracing, applying lessons from other sport and leisure industries.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A thorough understanding of the modern thoroughbred horseracing business and the ability to reflect upon theoretical debates around its functioning and to analyse critically processes and forces within it.

(LO2) An ability to critically reflect on the principal issues at stake in the international thoroughbred horseracing businesses; the governance of the sport; and the relationship between thoroughbred horseracing, the media, owners, trainers, the gaming and betting industry and other key stakeholders.

(LO3) An understanding of, and ability to analyse the economic principles underlying the development of thoroughbred horseracing and related businesses in the UK, Europe and globally, while appreciating the distinctive features of each environment.

(LO4) The ability to appraise the importance of branding, marketing, betting, gaming, horse care and intellectual property in the thoroughbred horseracing business.

(LO5) The ability to argue why the management of change is so important to the thoroughbred horseracing business and related industries in the coming years.

(LO6) Develop an understanding of key economic principles and apply these to: analyse business enterprises; understand competitive forces; formulate rational managerial decisions; and allocate resources efficiently.

(LO7) Develop a comprehensive understanding of the role of ethics in international business and the impact that this has on strategy, and the ability to recognise and address ethical dilemmas, corporate social responsibility and sustainability issues in an organisational context.

(S1) Teamwork. Developed via case study discussions, group presentation.

(S2) Communication skills. Developed via case study discussions, lectures and group presentation.

(S3) IT skills. Developed via preparation and delivery of the assignment and group presentation.

(S4) Independent research skills. Developed via preparation and delivery of the assignment and group presentation.

(S5) International awareness. Developed via lectures and case discussions of understanding of different international jurisdictions.

(S6) Commercial awareness. Developed via lectures and case discussions of different business models.

Marketing and Supply Chain Management (ULMS621)
Level2
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to provide a grounded appreciation of the utility and universality of a marketing orientation as the process by which organisations align themselves to their environments in order to exploit opportunities and gain competitive advantage. Key issues concern the nature and influences of environmental factors, the diversity of stakeholders, key supply chain relationships, the nature of customer behaviour in consumer and industrial markets and supply chain design.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Evaluate the nature and scope of the issues typically associated with understanding the environment.

(LO2) Define marketing and supply chain management and trace their development as business disciplines, with particular reference to the broadening scope of the function in recent years, to incorporate not only physical goods but also intangible services and other market offerings.

(LO3) Critically analyse the role that marketing and supply chain management play in identifying, analysing and exploiting opportunities for the organisation's products and/or services.

(LO4) Evaluate the changing roles of consumers in the 21st century mediated by information and communication technology.

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Commercial awareness

(S3) International awareness

Managing Financial Resources (ULMS616)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to provide students with an understanding of:

The responsibilities of organisations to stakeholders;

The context of financial information requirements, a conceptual framework for financial reporting;

Key financial statements of companies consistent with recognition and presentation in IAS1 and IAS7;

Interpretation of financial statements;

How management plan for and exercise control of financial resources;

Financial decision making;

How major capital resource decisions are made to optimise shareholder wealth;

The value chain and how financial resources can be managed to add value;

How linkages between financial resources and value systems are created for competitive advantage;

How and from where businesses can raise capital.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understand the conceptual basis for financial reporting.

(LO2) Define the scope of responsibilities of organisations and their corporate governance arrangements and specify the role of financial resources within that context.

(LO3) Define the resources available to an organisation.

(LO4) Prepare and interpret basic financial statements in compliance with the international accounting standards IAS1 and IAS7.

(LO5) Understand the tools of the management of financial resources in terms of inter alia, financial reporting, management accounting and financial management.

(LO6) Show how and where value chains within organisations may be measured and assessed.

(LO7) Demonstrate an awareness of how key theoretical models and the management accounting framework can support financial decision making in relation to costing, budgeting, performance evaluation and financial reporting.

(LO8) Develop a comprehensive understanding of theories and the application of techniques in finance and financial management to support company valuation and resource management of a business.

(LO9) Utilise financial data to analyse decision alternatives and identify consequences for profitability as well as all stakeholders.

(S1) Problem solving skills. Developed through online content and guidance for the assessments.

(S2) Numeracy. Developed through online content and guidance for the assessments.

(S3) Commercial awareness. Developed through online content and guidance for the assessments.

(S4) Ethical awareness. Developed through online content and guidance for the assessments.

International Business and the Global Environment (ULMS619)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide students with a solid foundation for analysing the major characteristics of the international business environment and to understand the major implications of these characteristics for organisations involved in international business activities;

To give students a good understanding of the field of international business, why it matters, and what it entails;

To give students a good understanding of the complexity of the international business environment, how it influences both national and international business activities, and how organisations are affected by, and deal with the international business environment;

To provide students with a solid foundation for identifying and analysing the main characteristics of the international business environment;

To provide students with a solid foundation for making informed judgments on strategic choices on internationalisation and international management;

The major objective of the module is for students to develop knowledge on international business, and are able to use this knowledge to analyse different international scenarios resulting in an informed and well thought-out choice.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain a good understanding of, and be able to critically reflect on, the main topics and theories in the field international business, dealing with the global economy and the role that multinational enterprises play within this economy.

(LO2) Students will be able to identify the relevant aspects for making strategic decisions of multinational enterprises, and effectively analyse them.

(LO3) Students will be able to judge the relevancy of different (and competing) information, resulting in a well thought-out and substantiated decision.

(LO4) Students will be able to develop plans for implementing a high-level strategic decision.

(S1) Teamwork. Students will work in teams on the group report and in preparing presentations.

(S2) Presentation skills. Students will be required to deliver presentations as part of this module.

(S3) Written communication skills. Developed through preparation of the group and individual reports.

(S4) Independent research skills. Developed through preparation for the individual assignment and class material.

(S5) International awareness. Students will develop their international awareness skills through the international nature of the module's syllabus.

(S6) Analytical skills. Students will develop their analytical skills through preparation for the assignments and in-class group work.

(S7) Decision-making skills. Students will develop their decision-making skills through preparation for the assignments and in-class group work.

Racecourse and Event Management (ULMS607)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to concepts within racecourse and event management;

To enable students to identify, understand and analyse the distinct features of racecourse and event management and how these work successfully especially in the thoroughbred horseracing industries.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To understand and develop an ability to critique the key characteristics and specific challenges and strategic options of Racecourse and Event Management.

(LO2) To acquire specific knowledge and understanding of Racecourse and Event Management and how to research Racecourse and Event operations and market demand.

(LO3) To understand and evaluate the business and financial drivers of success in Racecourse and Event Management and what underpins this.

(LO4) To understand what is specific about Racecourse management and how to meet the challenges of operating and marketing successfully within these.

(S1) Understanding of key racecourse and event management concepts. Developed through lectures and case discussions.

(S2) Teamwork skills. Developed through group presentations, case discussions.

(S3) Organisation skills. Developed through group presentations, individual assignments.

(S4) Communication skills. Developed through case study discussions, lectures, group presentations.

(S5) IT skills. developed through assignment and group presentation.

(S6) Independent research skills. Developed through individual assignment and group presentation preparation.

(S7) International awareness. Developed through lectures, case discussions, group presentations.

Equine Welfare and Ethics in the Thoroughbred Horseracing Industries (VETS800)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to concepts and the importance of Thoroughbred Racehorse Welfare and management, as well as Thoroughbred Racing Security/integrity in the UK and internationally.

To provide an insight into how Thoroughbred horses are managed successfully in different environments and at different stages of their careers, in particular in relation to the public face of racing.

To provide students with the knowledge required to understand and analyse challenges to Thoroughbred Racehorse welfare and management in various context

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Critically evaluate Thoroughbred Racehorse welfare practices and their associated public relations issues, differentiating welfare and ethical considerations.

(LO2) Critically appraise current Thoroughbred Racehorse industry regulations and practices in terms of how these regulations ensure the best care, security and integrity for the horses, especially at race meetings.

(LO3) Critically evaluate the determinants ofquality Thoroughbred Racehorse management and how they apply to the industry from birth (breeding), through sales, training, racing and retirement.

(LO4) Develop (synthesise) a strategic approach to balancing Thoroughbred Racehorse welfare, integrity and security issues, while meeting the challenges of operating successfully in a commercial and public environment.

(S1) Teamwork

(S2) Organisational skills

(S3) Communication skills

(S4) Lifelong learning skills

(S5) Ethical awareness

(S6) IT skills

(S7) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

Strategy and Organisation (ULMS617)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim of this module is to provide students with a sound understanding of what it means for an organisation to develop and implement a strategy that enables it to achieve and sustain competitive advantage. They learn to evaluate critically how the processes of strategic management assist firms in major corporate and business decisions relating to the scope, scale and direction of an organisation’s activities. Students learn how to identify and analyse strategic challenges and opportunities, and to develop, evaluate, and select recommendations for implementable strategic actions. Using a case-based approach, the module encourages students to put themselves into the shoes of managers who are faced with strategic dilemmas or underexploited opportunities. They are then given a range of approaches, frameworks and methods in order to analyse and understand these challenges on a deeper level, and develop meaningful strategic options. The module draws on both behavioural and economic perspectives on strategy. It aims to make students aware of central theories and debates in the strategy literature (e.g., the resource-based view of the firm, value creation and value appropriation strategies, theories of competitive positioning, the notion of the boundaries of the firm). It also helps students to develop a conceptual understanding of resilience and an awareness of strategies for coping with disruptive change. Furthermore, the module takes a critical approach, in that it provides opportunities to reflect on the purpose of a business and the effects of strategic actions on different stakeholder groups .

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Define strategy and trace its development as a business discipline, with particular reference to the broadening scope of the field from positioning, resource-based approaches, and strategies for coping with disruptive change.

(LO2) Identify key elements of strategic management, from mission through to implementation and critically evaluate how the process of strategic management assists organisations in major corporate and business decisions relating to the scope, scale and direction of an organisation's activities.

(LO3) Analyse an organisation and identify its strategic strengths and weaknesses.

(LO4) Understand the notions of value creation and strategic prioritising approaches derived from it.

(LO5) Develop a critical awareness of the key issues in international business and management, demonstrating awareness of a range of perspectives of the global economy, the inter-relationships between companies internationally, and the global nature of strategy.

(LO6) Analyse markets and industries using a variety of strategic management approaches, while understanding the limitations of those approaches.

(LO7) Develop a comprehensive understanding of the role of ethical dilemmas, corporate social responsibility and sustainability issues in strategic management and the impact this has on strategy.

(S1) Adaptability. Use of multiple cases and examples. Students need to switch from one problem set to the next quickly.

(S2) Problem solving skills. Each case involves a set of complex problems that need to be addressed.

(S3) Numeracy. The module involves a heavy emphasis on empirical analyses in the context of strategic questions.

(S4) Commercial awareness. Solutions are assessed with respect to the question of whether they are commercially viable.

(S5) Teamwork. The presentation is held by diverse teams (in terms of nationality, gender, etc.)

(S6) Organisational skills. The module has tight deadlines. The group presentation requires good organisational skills.

(S7) Communication skills. Cases are discussed interactively and presented by groups. Students need good written communication skills for their assignments.

(S8) IT skills. Use of presentation software and spreadsheet packages for problem solving.

(S9) International awareness. The module discusses case studies of international companies.

(S10) Lifelong learning skills. Nature of strategy requires application to real-life settings.

(S11) Ethical awareness. Ethical implications of strategic decision-making situations are discussed.

Leadership, Management and Organisation (ULMS620)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to develop an understanding of a range of factors relevant to the leadership and management of people in organisations. Students will be encouraged to consider and reflect upon theories and concepts related to leadership, management and organisational behaviour. Moving in focus through the levels of individual, group and organisation, the module aims to support students in their reflection and application of these concepts to their own experience of organisations. The module aims to develop an awareness and appreciation of the issues and practices that support or hinder the management and development of people and performance in dynamic organisations.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Analyse the nature and impact of individual differences in personality, values, motivations and behaviours in group and organisational contexts.

(LO2) Understand and critically reflect on a range of approaches used to manage people to achieve organisational outcomes in changing organisational contexts.

(LO3) Critically evaluate theories and perspectives on effective leadership in organisations, and the relevance of these for their own sector of interest.

(LO4) Explore the relationship between leadership and management approaches, ethics and the development of organisational culture.

(LO5) Reflect on their own values, personality, interpersonal skills, management and leadership style and identify relevant areas for personal development.

(S1) Teamwork. Students are assigned to groups to produce a presentation and then have to work collaboratively to produce the video.

(S2) International awareness. Exploring the future issues of leadership will include a global analysis.

(S3) Communication skills. The video itself will require the development of communication skills using digital technology. Students have to communicate with eachother to produce their combined video reflection.

(S4) Ethical awareness. Students are encouraged to consider differences in personal values and the impact of these.

(S5) Leadership. Students will reflect on and contrast leadership styles and approaches.

Sport, the Law, Regulation and Integrity (ULMS608)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to the ways in which the thoroughbred horseracing industry is subject to legal regulation;

To introduce students to the role of independent regulation and arbitration;

To enable students to identify, understand and analyse the processes and forces of law in this area.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An understanding of and ability to appraise the basic principles of UK and European law and the impact of legal and regulatory processes and forces upon the Thoroughbred Horseracing industry.

(LO2) Understand and interpret husbandry and legal issues in breeding and racing.

(LO3) Applicability of and ability to appraise property and personal insurance, employer’s and public liability insurance and property transactions.

(LO4) How to access, understand and utilise primary legal material.

(LO5) Evaluate the relationship between horseracing and gambling, analysing the implications of the relevant legislation and ethical considerations.

(LO6) An ability to critically reflect on governance issues at stake in the international Thoroughbred Horseracing businesses. Including the relationship between Thoroughbred Horseracing, the media, owners, trainers, the gaming and betting industry and other key stakeholders.

(LO7) The ability to appraise the importance of branding, marketing and intellectual property in the Thoroughbred Horseracing business.

(S1) Adaptability. Students will develop an awareness of how the law changes the Thoroughbred Horseracing industry.

(S2) Problem-solving skills. Students will be required to apply law to scenario based problems.

(S3) Commercial awareness. Students will develop an awareness of commercial and animal welfare pressures on the Thoroughbred Horseracing industry.

(S4) Teamwork skills. Students will develop team working skills through group work in scenario discussion; group exercise.

(S5) Organisation skills. Students will be required to meet assessment deadlines.

(S6) Communication skills. Students will develop communication skills via assignment presentation and negotiation exercise.

(S7) IT skills. Students will develop IT skills via assignment presentation.

(S8) International Awareness. Students will develop an awareness of the impact of EU and international law and regulation.

(S9) Lifelong learning skills. Students will develop lifelong learning skills via assignment presentation and negotiation exercise.

Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ULMS622)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

As a ‘capstone’ module this module addresses one of the most important topics that reflects a subject that will increasingly occupy students' time as they progress in their careers and are called upon to respond to the challenges posed by uncertain, complex and dynamic business environments. This module is therefore designed to have an integrative role across the MBA programme, creating systemic bridges to other mission critical models. Equipping m anagers to m ake a d ifference will engage them in a learning experience that will explore and develop the competencies and capabilities managers need to demonstrate.

The objective of this module is to integrate the two fields of innovation and entrepreneurship focusing upon management practice and creating change in a range of sectors. It will approach the analysis of innovation and entrepreneurship by drawing attention to relevant theories and research but placing more emphasis on applying these to practice in a broader context including the private, public and third sector and ways of creating new business models, opportunities, value and change. In particular, the module will examine issues and dilemmas in 'doing' innovation and entrepreneurship. More specifically we aim to:

Review the key theories and recent research relevant to understanding the dynamics and practice of innovation and entrepreneurship;

Discuss the main types, strategies and processes of innovation and entrepreneurship, as well as the main challenges that are encountered in successfully implementing change;

Understand the different definitions and types of innovation and identify the relationships between innovation, entrepreneurship and the performance of organisations in a range of sectors, including the private, public and third sectors;

Examine the approaches that can be employed to analyse organisational strategies, structures, cultures and business models as a basis for enhancing innovation and entrepreneurial activity;

Describe the phases of the process of innovation and entrepreneurship including ‘Recognising the Opportunity’; ‘Finding the Resources’; ‘Developing the Venture’; and ‘Creating Value’;

Understand the contributions of innovation and entrepreneurship in emerging and developing economies and for the sustainability of local, regional and national economies in the developed economies.

The module will introduce participants to the state-of-the-art thinking in bringing together innovation and entrepreneurship by drawing on current research findings. In addition, the module will utilise an 'active learning' approach in which the students carry out their own projects, in small groups, to develop and commercialise innovative ideas and concepts from a range organisations. The overall aim of the module is to encourage critical reflection on the complex issues involved in 'doing' innovation and entrepreneurship and to increase participants’ awareness of the challenges as well as opportunities available to develop appropriate business models and new value creation and change.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Describe and critique theories of innovation and entrepreneurship.

(LO2) Explain theories of innovation and entrepreneurship and their relevance for understanding approaches to strategy and day-to-day operational management and management of change.

(LO3) Analyse and critique relevant business models and the relationship and impact on innovation and entrepreneurship.

(LO4) Evaluate and describe individual and organisational barriers to innovating and entrepreneurship in a variety of contexts.

(LO5) Evaluate critically the key theories of creativity and innovation and their implementation as a means for developing an organisational culture which supports these.

(LO6) Develop a conceptual understanding of resilience and a critical awareness of strategies for coping with disruptive change.

(LO7) Understand and evaluate the customer value proposition of new business opportunities including the impact of the latest information and communication technologies.

(S1) Adaptability

(S2) Problem solving skills

(S3) Numeracy

(S4) Commercial awareness

(S5) Teamwork

(S6) Organisational skills

(S7) Communication skills

(S8) IT skills

(S9) International awareness

(S10) Lifelong learning skills

(S11) Ethical awareness

(S12) Leadership

Developing As A Horseracing Industries Executive (ULMS605)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:

Provide students with an understanding of the skills and capabilities needed to be an effective and competent executive in the thoroughbred horseracing industry;

Enable students to critically reflect on their own skills and knowledge in this area;

Develop communication skills to assist in crisis management situations;

Prepare students for senior management and leadership roles within the horseracing industry;

Provide an appreciation of the range of opportunities that exist to develop the students' careers, both within and outside of the horseracing industry.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate a high level of self-awareness.

(LO2) Develop the ability to reflect on a range of sources of feedback in order to improve practice and personal effectiveness.

(LO3) Develop the key skills and capabilities required to be a competent executive within the thoroughbred horseracing industries.

(LO4) Understand the differences between and the context of leadership and management in sports businesses and reflect on own development needs in this area.

(LO5) Develop an awareness of organisational behaviour and its implications for management and leadership of individuals and groups.

(S1) Career management. Students will produce a personal development plan, engage in discussions with industry experts and the ULMS Careers Advisor.

(S2) Critical reflection. Students will reflect on feedback from diagnostics and a range of other sources.

(S3) Networking. Students will interact with a range of sector specialists.

(S4) Communication skills. Students will undertake media interview training.

(S5) IT skills. Developed through preparation for assessed coursework.

The Economics and Finance of the International Thoroughbred Horseracing Industries (ULMS609)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to concepts within the economics and finance of the international thoroughbred horseracing industry;

To enable students to identify, understand and analyse the key economic and financial issues facing the international thoroughbred horseracing industry.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To understand the Economics and Finance of The International Thoroughbred Horseracing Industry.

(LO2) To acquire specific knowledge and understanding the Economic drivers in the Thoroughbred Horseracing Industry notably those shaped by different stakeholders and different economic environments.

(LO3) To build an appreciation of Financial Challenges facing of Thoroughbred Horseracing Industry locally and globally.

(LO4) To understand the drivers of economic and financial success and what underpins this for different stakeholders and to understand what is specific about the Thoroughbred Horseracing Industry, notably the role of sponsors and gambling and how to meet the challenges of operating successfully within these.

(S1) Understanding of the key economics and finance issues in the international thoroughbred horseracing industry. Developed through lectures and case discussions.

(S2) Teamwork skills. Developed through group presentations, case discussions.

(S3) Organisation skills. Developed through group presentations, individual assignments.

(S4) Communication skills. Developed through case study discussions, lectures, group presentations.

(S5) IT skills. Developed through the assignment and group presentation.

(S6) Independent research skills. Developed through individual assignment and group presentation preparation.

(S7) International awareness. Developed through lectures, case discussions, group presentations.

Work Based Project (ULMS823)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module prepares MBA students to undertake their work based project which is the final integrative activity of the MBA Programme.

The aim of this module is to provide a process which will enable students to use and extend knowledge and skills that they have acquired during their programme of study. Using appropriate management research methodologies and/or data collection methods, students will have the opportunity to explore an area of interest within management in significantly greater depth than during the taught modules themselves.

Students will work on a specific project for an organisation. The organisation selected will function as the 'client'. The aim of this path is to enable students to undertake a self managed process of systematic practitioner inquiry within the domain of management. The output will be:

A management report which addresses the issue or problem identified and agreed with the client, which should be in the format appropriate to that organisation;

An academic report detailing the stages of the research, the literature reviewed, the methodology and techniques deployed, and the rationale for these. This will also include a reflective piece on the student's personal development.

The combined wordcount for the two reports is likely to be in the range of 8,000-10,000 words.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Engage with a client organisation with the aim of investigating a current management problem.

(LO2) Diagnose and analyse client problems and issues using a structured programme of management research.

(LO3) Synthesise data from a wide variety of sources in order to evaluate client problems and issues.

(LO4) Prepare and present the consultancy findings, conclusions and recommendations in formats acceptable to the client.

(LO5) Reflect on their personal development throughout and as a result of this activity.

(S1) Problem solving skills. Often, the focus of a work-based project is to solve a particular problem or issue within the firm. Even minor improvements to systems or processes entail overcoming problems in reaching solutions to issues.

(S2) Numeracy. Developed through the quantitative research in the taught elements of the programme and assessed in the final project, via data analysis, critical evaluation of numeric data, and recommendations which need to have cost implications.

(S3) Commercial awareness. Lectures will focus on business examples and applications of data analysis. The work-based project, by its very nature, will demonstrate commercial awareness throughout.

(S4) Organisation skills. Developed via meeting with the client organisation, meeting the research brief, and meeting several phased deadlines throughout the project preparation.

(S5) Communication skills. The student will need to demonstrate high level written communication skills in the both the management and the academic parts of the project.

(S6) IT skills. Taught in the research methods training part of the module, and demonstrated in the project itself.

(S7) Lifelong learning skills. A compulsory element of the project is a reflection on learning, where students examine the skills they have developed and reflect on how they will continue to use these throughout their lives.

(S8) Ethical awareness. All research needs to be conducted under strict ethical guidelines, which are taught in the research methods training and applied in the project itself.

Dissertation (ULMS706)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterSummer (June-September)
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide students with tools to refine a research topic into an appropriate research problem and questions;

To offer guidance for students to choose the research design which is the most appropriate to the objectives and constraints relating to their research;

To focus on in-depth research gathering skills;

To give an overview of different data collection methods, including questionnaires, focus groups, interviews and ethnography;

To explain how different research methods can be combined into a coherent methodological design and produce good empirical analysis;

To guide students for the dissertation writing process;

To show an ability to integrate theories and concepts drawn from the wider business/management literature with use of empirical case studies, use of empirical work, or references to appropriate empirical work and to develop expertise in that subject area;

To develop techniques which will improve research skills in problem definition, information collection, analysis, synthesis and reasoned argument;

To develop individual initiative and judgement;

To develop writing and other communication skills.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Develop an initial idea into a feasable research project;

(LO2) Be able to plan and schedule the dissertation;

(LO3) Appreciate how to choose appropriate research methods;

(LO4) Understand how to present a logical, critical and sustained argument, and develop conclusions in a manner consistent with Masters level;

(LO5) Be able to cite and reference literature that relates to their argument.

(S1) Adaptability. Developed through the proposal preparation, discussion and dissertation writing.

(S2) Problem solving skills. Lectures involve tasks that take specific cases from firms where students get the opportunity to analyse the case and offer solutions.

(S3) Numeracy. SPSS workshops give students the opportunity to learn how to analyse quantitative data and data interpretation.

(S4) Commercial awareness. Lectures use cases that give students commercial relevance in conducting research.

(S5) Teamwork. Workshops are team based. Proposal presentation gives students the opportunity to support each other as a team.

(S6) Organisation skills. Producing a research proposal and putting into practice as a part of the dissertation helps to develop organisation skills.

(S7) Communication skills. Research proposal presentation and group work require students to develop communication skills.

(S8) IT skills. Secondary data search requires IT skills. SPSS data analysis workshops also give students the chance to learn new software.

(S9) International awareness. Systematic literature review that is promoted in dissertation allows students to access work from international journals.

(S10) Lifelong learning skills. Critical reflection as in the proposal presentation and group discussions, is a key way in which lifelong learning is developed.

(S11) Ethical awareness. This is an important element in research and ethical issues are widely discussed in lectures.

(S12) Leadership. Team tasks help to develop leadership skills.