Sustainable Heritage Management MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months  
  • Programme start: September 2022
  • Entry requirements: An upper second-class (2:i) Bachelor's degree from a UK university or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard is normally required. See entry requirements for professional experience information.
Photograph of the three graces and the Museum of Liverpool

Module details

Core modules cover concepts, principles and practices of sustainable heritage management in the first semester; and focus on the application of sustainability, tourism, conservation and regeneration notions on real-world projects in the second semester. Over the summer, you will carry out your own dissertation work, which will be either research-based or research by design.

An optional placement is offered in semester two, and may involve work experience in a library, museum, historic property, or other cultural institutions. Work placements will introduce students to the real working environment and enable you to establish valuable contacts within the industry. Some of our heritage partners, who offer placements, include National Museums Liverpool, Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, Slate Museum Wales, Victoria Gallery & Museum, and Port Sunlight Conservation Trust.

You will also have the opportunity to be involved in the activities carried out by well-established research groups in the University, including the Heritage Theme, the Architectural and Urban History Group and ArCHIAM Centre.

You will study five compulsory modules including either ARCH721 or ARCH722.

Please note: programme and module details are illustrative and subject to change. 

Compulsory modules

Heritage Perspectives and Policies (ARCH735)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:

1. Introduce the students to the core principles, perceptions and philosophy relating to understanding heritage in its wider spectrum, covering its local, national and global contexts.
2. Provide the students with knowledge to understand the meanings and definitions of all types of heritage, including but not limited to, listed buildings and designated areas such as conservation areas, archaeological sites, natural heritage, mixed, and intangible heritage.
3. Provide students with the knowledge of unusual heritage sites, including battlefields, natural caves, geoglyphs, earthworks, and industrial features.
4. Provide students with skills to address the challenges faced by managing heritage assets, including tangible and intangible, in times of disasters, natural or manmade.
5. Provide students with skills to critically debate the notion of the diversity of meanings and values attributed to heritage properties. These include but not limited to authenticity, integrity and outstanding universal values, in particular in the context of sustainable development.
6. Promote the students’ understanding of the variety of heritage stakeholders, their roles and influence in understanding and managing heritage assets including contracting and finance.
7. Provide students with the knowledge and skills to be able to investigate international legislation (e.g. charters and conventions), as well as exploring national policy and practice documents that frame cultural heritage management and conservation activities and practices.
8. Provide students with skills to address the challenges relating to the application of national and international policies, including the convergence and divergence in theories and practices, as well as understanding of building materials and safeguarding techniques.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Develop a critical understanding of the different perspectives of historic and heritage properties and assets across the UK, Europe and internationally.

(LO2) Investigate and assess the significance of sites, structures, buildings and areas through both visual and archival reserach, and understand the notion of the values attributed to a variety of heritage assets including but not limited to archaeological sites, listed buildings and fabric (including local and national listings), conservation areas and other designated and living sites and intangible elements such as oral traditions.

(LO3) Develop understanding on appropriate methods for the sustainable conservation repair and maintenance of historic assets including repair techniques and the availability of materials.

(LO4) Critically investigate the associations between theory and practice within local, national and international heritage policy documents.

(LO5) Demonstrate awareness of a variety of techniques and methods related to research, analyse and record different types of heritage properties, including buildings and other historic fabric and structures, archaeological remains and oral history, in consideration of heritage legislations to achieve sustainable heritage management and conservation.

(LO6) Confirm a critical understanding of heritage as sustainable assets; besides being able to interact and negotiate effectively with different types of heritage stakeholders.

(LO7) Critically investigate the challenges of managing, securing and conserving heritage sites/ assets in cases of natural disasters or conflicts.

(LO8) Demonstrate knowledge of decision-making process around investments towards sustainable heritage management; besides being familiar with funding and grants contexts criteria and process, such as the available grants that assist building conservation and area regeneration.

(LO9) Demonstrate knowledge of decision-making process on the special importance and the suitability for designation, listing, scheduling or other means of protection of a variety of heritage assets locally and internationally.

(S1) Data collection, research and analysis skills.

(S2) Demonstrate international perspectives as professional and citizens; by being able to locate, discuss, analyse, and evaluate information from international sources; besides considering issues from a variety of cultural perspectives.

(S3) Understanding ethical and social responsibility issues in local, national and international settings; value diversity of language and culture.

(S4) Problem solving/ questioning and critical thinking.

(S5) Written literacy/ ability to produce clear, well-structured and well-written work.

(S6) Communication and presentation skills, including visual and oral literacies.

(S7) Time management.

Heritage Management: Approaches and Methods (ARCH736)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:

1. Develop a critical understanding of why and how heritage landscapes and sites, fabric, resources and assets (including tangible, intangible and natural) are managed, safeguarded, presented and explained in ways that support sustainable development.
2. Introduce students to the complex challenges of heritage management currently faced by heritage bodies, professionals and communities, including the choices they have to make, balancing development needs, funding and wider economic pressures, tourism demands and the politics surrounding heritage.
3. Develop an understanding of the primary methods, techniques and tools used, as well as archival and other secondary research necessary, to document different types of heritage: from tangible heritage assets, such as settlements, buildings, artefacts and archaeological sites, to intangible heritage assets, such as cultural landscapes, traditional knowledge, performative arts and craft practices, and oral history.
4. Develop an understanding of the methods and tools for analysing and establishing the values and significances of heritage assets, identifying threats and building on opportunities for sustainable development, and assessing the suitability of heritage management and safeguarding measures.
5. Provide students with knowledge to tackle a variety of challenges from stakeholder institutions and disciplinary perspectives, e.g., planning authorities, museums and other repositories, education, conservation, and archaeology, at various levels: locally, nationally and internationally.
6. Develop an understanding of the wide-ranging approaches for managing heritage, from conservation to new intervention, and from restoration to adaptive reuse.
7. Develop the students’ knowledge of contractual aspects of conservation and heritage management, besides being familiar with different sources of funding for the management of heritage sites, and the ability to seek and use resources effectively.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Critically evaluate – adopting a cultural landscape approach – the different strategies through which heritage is managed in a sustainable way including, conservation, safeguarding or consolidation, restoration, interpretation, rebuilding, adaptive reuse and new interventions.

(LO2) Develop in-depth understanding of the practical challenges facing the heritage bodies, regulators, professionals and communities, towards achieving sustainable developmental solutions while safeguarding heritage assets.

(LO3) Critically examine the practice of implementing local, national, and international legislations, statutes and guidelines to achieve sustainable heritage management.

(LO4) Acquire knowledge in relation to procurement strategies, as well as around conservation and heritage management project contracts, methods of valuation, cost planning and funding application.

(LO5) Debate and examine different solutions to tackle the diversity of challenges at various levels, sustainable heritage management is facing in both theories and practice.

(LO6) Acquire knowledge of a range of analytical and evaluative methods to analyse and interpret heritage documentation towards sustainable heritage management master planning, as well as to be able to make recommendations on appropriate approaches for safeguarding and managing heritage sites and properties.

(LO7) Acquire knowledge of decision-making process around investments towards sustainable heritage management, besides being familiar with grants and funding application process.

(LO8) Develop in-depth understanding on appropriate methods for assessments of sites and building condition, and knowledge of the maintenance of historic buildings, areas and sites.

(S1) Written literacy/ ability to produce clear, well-structured and well-written work.

(S2) Communication and presentation skills.

(S3) Heritage drawing skills.

(S4) Problem solving/ questioning and critical thinking.

(S5) Analytical and interpretative skills of situations and facts towards making appropriate choices and developing effective solutions.

(S6) Time management.

(S7) Teamwork.

Heritage Management and Sustainable Development (ARCH738)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:
1. Provide students with the relevant knowledge to link theory, policy and practice in heritage management and conservation in the context of local sustainable development.
2. Provide students with the necessary skills to develop a critical understanding of heritage, particularly in the context of rapidly changing built environments and societies, which builds on historical research as well as fieldwork and observation, and an ability to assess, evaluate and communicate it.
3. Assist students to acquire knowledge of key strategies, methods and techniques in sustainable cultural heritage management, including the assessment of the significance and impact of development proposals on historic built environments, and be able to apply these within different contexts nationally and internationally.
4. Develop the students’ knowledge of the wider spectrum of building deterioration conditions for different construction and materials, and their ability to identify the most appropriate and sustainable intervention approaches and repair actions.
5. Allow students to develop knowledge of contemporary design approaches, strategies and tactics in the context of interventions within historic settings and fabric, and the ability to apply the above understandings to real-life projects.
6. Develop the students’ understanding of funding strategies and processes for the implementation of heritage management plans, including the identification of relevant existing funding schemes as well as the evaluation and suggestion of private-public funding ventures, cost/ resources/ capital investment/ amortization/ revenue generation planning.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Assess the significance of different heritage assets, including architectural, archaeological and living heritage sites, single assets and intangible heritage elements, to identify heritage assets in need of safeguarding.

(LO2) Develop visions, guidelines, master plans and design proposals to sustainably integrate heritage preservation with development, including heritage impact assessment.

(LO3) Develop an ability to evaluate the state of preservation of built heritage as well as identify, map and visually illustrate structural and non-structural defects, an understanding of causes and patterns of damage in a range of structures, and an awareness of appropriate conservation approaches and technical repair measures.

(LO4) Distinguish between different categories and levels of intervention towards heritage safeguarding, identify and apply the most appropriate, based on a holistic evaluation of the property’s state of preservation and the local social, political and economic conditions.

(LO5) Understand the role of community participation in integrated sustainable heritage management and development, and apply relevant outreach and public engagement techniques, supported by awareness raising and capacity building methods.

(LO6) Understand funding strategies and processes for the implementation of heritage management plans, and methods for cost/ resources/ capital investment/ amortization planning.

(LO7) Understand the causes and patterns of damage in a wide range of structures and an awareness of the technology employed in the repair and strengthening of historic buildings.

(S1) Mapping, surveying and inventorying skills.

(S2) Master planning skills.

(S3) Problem solving/ questioning and critical thinking/ inquisitive thinking in analysing situations and facts towards making appropriate choices and developing effective solutions.

(S4) Written literacy/ ability to produce clear, well-structured and well-written work.

(S5) Communication and presentation skills.

(S6) Teamwork.

(S7) Time management.

Research Methodology (ARCH707)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to equip the student with the key skills needed to prepare a written dissertation or design thesis at postgraduate level in architecture, with visiting lecturers describing their own research and dissertation preparation and methods, with the overall aim of assisting students to select, define and launch their dissertation/thesis projects.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Setting up and managing a research project

(LO2) Identifying a topic and understanding the stages of developing and conducting a research project.

(LO3) Using bibliographies, referencing, citations and quotations

(LO4) Understanding the principles of preparing and performing an effective oral presentation

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

(S2) Time and project management - Project planning

(S3) Research skills - All information skills

(S4) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

Thesis : Dissertation (ARCH721)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

A primary aim of this module is to offer the opportunity to submit a conventional written dissertation OR to submit a design thesis with supporting documentation on an approved topic or brief of their choice. The second of these alternatives responds to current research agendas in the field of architecture, sustainability, digital design or BIM.

To develop and practice academic skills in identifying a research topic, formulating a research design, managing the extended research process and achieving milestones, and drawing relevant policy conclusions from the research findings.

To develop a deeper understanding in depth of a relevant body of literature.

To develop analytical skills and critical thinking on current research issues.

To develop writing, presentation and bibliographic skills in preparing and submitting a high quality, fully-referenced dissertation.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To identify an appropriate research topic that can be investigated and reported on through sources of information that be in the form of written and/or design output.

(LO2) To manage the research process effectively within given resources and meeting milestones on time.

(LO3) To gain a deeper understanding of a particular topic in a chosen subject area.

(LO4) To form independent and objective views on issues in a specialised subject area.

(LO5) To produce a well-written, clearly presented consistently referenced and properly formatted Dissertation.

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice.

(S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis.

(S3) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills.

Thesis: Research By Design (ARCH722)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To carry out a specific piece of research on a self selected topic and to develop a designed object that is derived directly from it.

To develop and practice academic skills in identifying a current design problem, formulating an analysis strategy, managing the design process and drawing relevant conclusions from the design project and response to any research findings.

To develop the idea of an design in the widest sense as a vehicle to apply research study and information drawn from appropriate literature.

To develop a deeper understanding in depth of a relevant body of design precedent and literature.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The module is intended to allow students:

To identify an appropriate research topic that can be investigated and reported on through sources of information that be in the form of written and/or design output.

(LO2) To design an effective project using appropriate methods (e.g. literature review, case study) and techniques that is derived directly from and satisfies the researched topic.

(LO3) To manage the research process effectively within given resources and meeting milestones on time.

(LO4) To gain a deeper understanding of a particular topic in a chosen subject area.

(LO5) To form independent and objective views on issues in a specialised subject area.

(LO6) To produce a well-written, clearly presented consistently referenced and properly formatted Research Report and a well-conceived, appropriate, well-supported and well-executed design project that is derived from the research.

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice.

(S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis.

(S3) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

(S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual.

Optional modules

Architectural and Urban Forms of the Islamic World (ARCH737)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:

1. Provide students with an understanding of the role of urban and building rehabilitation within historic fabrics.
2. Provide students with knowledge about the transitions from the past to the future by exploring reconstruction, renovation and adaptive reuse practices.
3. Provide students with skills to be able to analyse and compare Islamic high and vernacular architecture and urban form to gain a deeper insight into the breadth of Islamic cultural traditions worldwide.
4. Provide students with methods and tools for establishing critical understanding of the architectural and urban elements of the Islamic city in different contexts, including ‘high’ and ‘peripheral’ traditional settlements.
5. Introduce students to the complex challenges of heritage management of Islamic cities including key architectural structures, such as mosques, madrasas, and fortification elements.
6. Provide students with skills to be able to investigate the complexity involved in community participation and the use of traditional material in reconstruction and renovation in different geographical contexts.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Develop a critical understanding of the evolution of the Islamic world, through historical chronological outlines highlighting locational characteristics and organisational features.

(LO2) Investigate and compare the principal architectural and urban elements of the Islamic city in different contexts, including ‘high’ and ‘peripheral’ traditional settlements.

(LO3) Explore methods of interventions on existing buildings and urban spaces for the enhancement of their historic significance and contemporary use.

(LO4) Critically investigate the relevance of architectural qualities and urban characteristics of Islamic built environments in general (medina form for example), and in particular (mosques, madrasas, ornaments) to contemporary design.

(LO5) Apply a variety of techniques and methods related to investigating contemporary debates surrounding the issues of conservation and restoration in the Islamic world.

(LO6) Confirm a critical understanding of definitions, rationale and relevance, methodological approach, design operations and tools for adaptive reuse and/or development proposals.

(LO7) Critically understand the importance of building a resilient community through collaborative rehabilitation efforts, besides investigating participatory design methods and strategies applied to restoration and adaptive reuse initiatives.

(S1) Data collection, research and analysis skills.

(S2) Demonstrate international perspectives by being able to locate, discuss, analyse, and evaluate information from international sources.

(S3) Understanding ethical and social responsibility issues in particular settings; value diversity and similarities of architectural languages and cultures.

(S4) Problem solving/ questioning and critical thinking.

(S5) Written literacy/ ability to produce clear, well-structured and well-written work, besides producing heritage drawings.

(S6) Communication and presentation skills / oral literacy.

(S7) Time management.

Heritage Documentation, Digitization and Presentation (ARCH739)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:
1. Assist students to develop an understanding of the methods, techniques, applications and tools used in the documentation of different types of heritage: from tangible heritage assets such as settlements and buildings, archaeological sites and artefacts, to intangible heritage assets such as cultural landscapes, traditional knowledge, arts and crafts, oral history and significant historical events.
2. Provide students with the ability to identify the most appropriate strategy, approach and method to document heritage, based on a holistic consideration of the parameters involved such as nature and age of the asset, time and resources availability, asset values, target audiences, and end-users.
3. Develop, through hands-on activities, the students’ technical knowledge and basic skills in field documentation of built heritage through sketching, 3D laser scanning and photogrammetry, terrestrial and aerial photography.
4. Develop, through hands-on activities, the students’ technical knowledge and basic skills in digital representation and visualization of built heritage through 2D drawing, traditional 3D modelling, 3D spatial data generation, rendering.
5. Develop the students’ technical knowledge of the workflows, standards and applications for digital acquisition and archiving of vulnerable heritage assets such as photographic slides and prints, film and glass plate negatives, maps and drawings, field sketches and notes.
6. Develop, through hands-on activities, the students’ basic skills in digitization, metadata development at multiple levels (collection/ work / image) and data entry for vulnerable heritage assets.
7. Develop the students’ basic knowledge about virtual heritage technologies and applications such as Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR).

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understand, identify and apply the most appropriate methods, techniques and tools in the context of the documentation and presentation of tangible and intangible heritage properties and assets.

(LO2) Understand and apply workflows and standards in the context of heritage digital archiving.

(LO3) Understand technologies and applications for virtual recreation and immersive experience of heritage assets and settings.

(LO4) Develop a model template for field documentation, surveying, reporting, presenting the outputs produced as part of the hands-on activities and critically reflecting on methods, techniques and equipment used, data collected and preliminary observation findings, and challenges encountered.

(LO5) Develop a model template for digital heritage records presentation, including the images digitised as part of the hands-on activities illustrated by metadata on collections, subjects and images.

(LO6) Assess the most suitable building conservation techniques and ways to prevent future material decay by utilising digital tools and following appropriate conservation practice.

(S1) Heritage drawing skills.

(S2) Digitization and IT skills.

(S3) Communication and presentation skills.

(S4) Written literacy/ ability to produce clear, well-structured and well-written work.

(S5) Problem solving/ questioning and critical thinking/ inquisitive thinking in analysing situations and facts towards making appropriate choices and developing effective solutions.

(S6) Teamwork.

(S7) Time management.

Professional Placement (ARCH740)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module provides an opportunity for students to gain credit for experience gained in a 10-day placement with a heritage sector provider.
This module aims to:
1. Provide students with working experience within a heritage related organisation to gain an understanding of the various operational aspects of a heritage sector, its environment and working practices.
2. Provide students with the opportunity to apply academic and/or theoretical knowledge within a practical heritage context in collaboration with external partners.
3. Provide students with practical knowledge to be able to negotiate in connection with applications for listed buildings, scheduled monument and conservation area consent and other statutory consents.
4. Develop and engage the students in relevant topics with external partners that focus on heritage management; collections management; heritage interpretation; event development; digital and online media; audience engagement; contribution to exhibition development; marketing and fundraising; educational events and/ or public engagement and outreach.
5. Develop the students’ personal and employability skills in a heritage related working environment, and reflect and report on this development.
6. Provide students with an opportunity to achieve impact through a clear and measurable work programme and sustainable heritage management practice.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate an ability to develop outputs and/or undertake tasks, according to a certain requirement, within a heritage related practical or vocational context.

(LO2) To reflect on and evaluate the effectiveness of the outputs developed and/or the tasks undertaken.

(LO3) To identify the connection between theoretical and academic knowledge and its practical or professional application.

(LO4) To identify, reflect and report on a range of personal and/or employability skills within a heritage sector.

(LO5) To be able to interact, negotiate and work with a variety of heritage stakeholders.

(S1) Awareness and experience of working within a heritage sector.

(S2) Improving own learning and performance, self-awareness and self-analysis.

(S3) Improving own personal action planning and record keeping.

(S4) Critical analysis, improving critical thinking and problem solving.

(S5) Communication skills (oral, written and visual).

(S6) Team working skills.

(S7) Time management skills.

(S8) Skills in using technology, using common and heritage related applications.

Architectural Theories From 1900 to the Present (ARCH712)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to introduce a broad framework of architectural concepts, themes and theories that have influenced the field of architecture globally from 1900 to the present. This framework can then serve as the critical foundation for design modules as well as the final 60-credit design project or dissertation.

The module also aims to introduce study, research and writing skills and methodologies and to link rigorous academic practices to real world and employment-related scenarios. Finally, the module aims to provide opportunities for the development of presentation, teamwork and time management skills via a variable and flexible seminar series and multiple activities throughout the semester.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Identify a range of theories that have been influential in the field of architecture from 1900 onwards.

(LO2) Recognise and discuss the significance and evolution of key concepts and themes and how these reflect the development of architectural trends from 1900 onwards.

(LO3) Evaluate the content and different perspectives of various written architectural sources.

(LO4) Research, situate historically, critique and present visually and verbally – orally and in writing – the relationship of specific theories to relevant built or unbuilt architectural projects or to the oeuvre of an architect or an architectural practice.

(LO5) Plan and manage a written project.

(LO6) Prepare a well-documented, referenced and appropriately illustrated academic essay.

(LO7) Use well-documented and referenced research in a shorter written format appropriate for real life or employment-related purposes.

(S1) Reading, research and writing skills.

(S2) Critical thinking skills.

(S3) Visual and verbal communication skills.

(S4) Teamwork skills.

(S5) Time management skills.

Virtual Environments for Architecture (ARCH708)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To offer the knowledge and tools that allow students to critically understand the potential of VR and VE in Architecture and the wider context of the AEC industry, and to scrutinise the VR and VE technologies within a design project context.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historical context of VR and VE and how they can be used as an integral part of the design process.

(LO2) Establish familiarity with a variety of VR systems; their components, features, scope and limitations.

(LO3) Demonstrate ability to investigating the potential benefits of VR systems in architecture, construction and maintenance of buildings.

(LO4) Enhancing design and presentation skills through experiencing advanced software used for modelling, visualisation and animation.

(LO5) Development of the ability to structure, analyse and report on an area of investigation.

(S1) Independent learning skills.

(S2) Communication skills - written.

(S3) Communication skills - oral.

(S4) Communication skills - graphical.

(S5) Creative design skills.

(S6) 3D modelling and visualisation skills.

(S7) Team working skills.

Urban Design (ARCH731)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to the origin, theories and key design principles of urban design; To engage students in debates on current issues and challenges faced in the discipline and wider urban environment;   To promote understanding of the design context for practice and the ways through which urban design theories, principles and best practice examples can be translated into local practice; To encourage students to think critically about urban interventions in the complex system of cities locally and globally for long-term sustainability and place-making;   To provide the opportunity for students to understand and familiarise themselves with a wide range of urban analytical techniques and methods which would benefit their master-planning studio;   To develop students’ understanding of the policy role of urban design, its implementation through the planning system and general issues about design governance.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) After this module, students should be able to understand the key theories and principles of urban design and their influence on or applications to practice.

(LO2) Students should be able to critically discuss current issues and challenges faced in urban design in their local area.

(LO3) Students should be aware of  broader urban issues and challenges faced by other cities globally, not only in the Western context, but also in the global south.

(LO4) Students should be able to apply a variety of urban analytical techniques and methods in their practice for sustainable development and place-making.

(LO5) Students should be able to understand the process and role of urban design governance and its relationship with the planning system.

(S1) Communication skills

(S2) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

(S3) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S4) Literacy, application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy – including listening and questioning.

Digital Records: Their Nature, Use and Preservation in the Information Society (HIST566)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide students with an understanding of how ICT has affected, and will continue to affect, the role of the professional recordkeeper and the records / archives s/he manages;

To demonstrate how digital applications and resources can be applied in the ARM workplace, operationally and culturally, for a wide range of users;

To alert students to the resources available for managing digital provision, especially digital preservation, in the professional environment.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An understanding the impact of ICTs on the nature, creation and exploitation production of records and on working practices

(LO2) Engagement with ICT applications in the ARM environment, informed by knowledge of the extent to which ARM theory underpins such applications

(LO3) Ability to appreciate the needs of a wide range of users within the digital environment, in both operational and cultural contexts

(LO4) Development of awareness of (inter)national digital preservation initiatives and programmes and understaning of the tools necessary to implement a DP programme

(S1) Improving own learning / performance

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills

(S3) Commercial awareness - relevant understanding of organisations

International Record Keeping (HIST561)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Demonstrate understanding of the evolution of different models of record keeping theory and practice though awareness of the impact of different political, historical and cultural traditions on record-keeping theory and practice;  

Evaluate record keeping theory and practice in his/her own country in the light (1) and identify any professional ethical issues deriving from those circumstances;

Evaluate the role and effectiveness of international organisations and development agencies;

Discuss issues surrounding globalisation and human rights and analyse the professional ethical issues which may be part of these;  

Analyse the problems relating to the application of national and international standards: the convergence and divergence in theories and practices and the centrality of language and translation;

Demonstrate informed understanding of professional debates surrounding globalisation and human rights.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An awareness of texts, authors and debates relevant to the module and an ability to assess the associated ideas, arguments and contribution in relation to theory and practice.

(LO2) An improved ability to describe, contextualise and offer explanations for the complexity and diversity of events, practices and mentalities in areas relevant to the module.

(LO3) Appropriate knowledge of the professional context of record-keeping, including awareness of relevant professional bodies and government and international agencies and their impact on record-keeping practice, and the relationship between record-keeping and other related professions.

(LO4) Appropriate knowledge of the legal, regulatory and organisational environments of record-keeping and their impact on records creation and record-keeping practice.

(LO5) Deeper appreciation of the value of records and their management to support legal, financial, political and cultural functions in personal, organisational, community and/or societal contexts relevant to the scope of the module.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - oral

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness

(S4) Global citizenship - Ethical awareness

Philosophy of Film (PHIL757)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To consider the variety of ways of thinking philosophically about film. To encourage students to think about film in ways they might not have previously considered. To help students understand the issues and arguments that arise when considering film as an art form. To familiarise students with filmmakers and their methods, and to encourage them to think critically about them. To help students reflect on the differences between film and other art forms, and on the philosophical implications of these differences.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to assess issues that arise in philosophers’ approaches to film.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse some of the problems associated with the philosophy of film.

(LO3) Students will be able to explain philosophical difficulties involved in considering the relation of film to other art forms.

(LO4) Students will be able to assess philosophical issues raised by the methods of different filmmakers.

(LO5) Students will be able to evaluate arguments for and against film as art.

(LO6) Students will be able to reflect critically on various topics, such as adaptation, and the implications they might have for film as an art form.

(LO7) Students will be able to engage with philosophers and critics who hold controversial views on the importance of film.

(LO8) Students will be able to engage critically with the films presented on the module.

(S1) Students will further develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

(S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S3) Students will develop further confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

(S4) Students will enhance their ability to analyse works of film art.

(S5) Students will develop their confidence in group discussion of philosophical topics.

(S6) Students will improve their writing skills, presenting difficult topics in an engaging and lucid manner.

Aesthetics (PHIL716)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will explore in detail arguments of some of the most important philosophers on art, aesthetics and cultural theory, including Kant, Hegel, Danto and Tolstoy. Students will critically engage with key concepts and theories in aesthetics, including the aesthetic judgement, disinterestedness, the institutional theory of art, the nature of representation and expression and feminism and post-modern critiques. Students will be encouraged to develop connections between works of art and artistic practices of the past and present.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in aesthetics.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse and critically assess key concepts and arguments relating to aesthetics and art.

(LO3) Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in aesthetics at an advanced level.

(LO4) Students will be able to identify and develop links between influential philosophical theories and artistic practices.

(LO5) Students will be able to articulate, defend and criticise positions in aesthetics and philosophy of art.

(LO6) Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.

(LO7) Students will be able to develop in writing, coherent, structures and sophisticated accounts on abstract philosophical issues.

(S1) Develop skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the WWW and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

(S2) Enhance the capacity to participate in debates about controversial and profound issues.

(S3) Develop willingness to critically evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values.

(S4) Enhance the ability in reading and understanding complex texts and abstract material.

(S5) Develop skills in thinking critically, analyse problems in detail and providing in depth evaluation of arguments.

(S6) Enhance ability to identify, develop and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S7) Develop confidence in considering ideas and approaches with which they may be less familiar.

(S8) Enhance ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

(S9) Advance ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include citations and bibliographies in their work, organise and produce presentations of work to professional standard.

(S10) Enhance oral and written communication skills and develop skills in explaining complex material in a precise manner.