International Slavery Studies MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: Programme suspended for entry 2020
  • Entry requirements: You will need a BA in History or a related discipline (2:1 or above, or international equivalent).
International Slavery Studies MA

Module details

Compulsory modules

Histories of Slavery (HIST581)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students' familiarity with historical contexts for slavery and introduce them to potential areas for specialisation;

To introduce comparative concepts and ideas of "slavery", "freedom" and "forced labour" for students reflecting on their context in very different historical societies;

To allow staff and students to benefit from ambitious and broad discussion of slavery as a concept beyond discrete research contexts.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A sophisticated understanding of slavery as a conceptual category of analysis and the extent to which it aids our understanding of contemporary and historical experiences of freedom and "un-freedom".

(LO2) Appropriate disciplinary skills, becoming familiar with a range of techniques, methods and concepts deployed in the analysis of slaveries and their legacies.

(LO3) Knowledge of "slavery" in a wide variety of historical and contemporary contexts.

(S1) Skills of written communication and rational argument, drawing on appropriate disciplinary methods.

(S2) Expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.

(S3) Confident and constructive oral argument.

The Heritage of Slavery (HIST582)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students' familiarity with curatorial practice and theoretical approaches to the commemoration of slavery in museums and other reflections of public memory;

To apply scholarly approaches in analysing the achievements of the International Slavery Museum;

To contribute to the process of developing the International Slavery Museum's galleries in the future.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Analyse theoretical approaches to public history and the commemoration of slavery.

(LO2) Apply scholarly knowledge to the contextual evaluation of an existing interpretation of slavery in a museum, gallery or other venue.

(LO3) Advocate specific approaches to the interpretation of slavery in a particular context.

(LO4) Communicate ideas or conclusions to non-academic audiences

(LO5) Develop expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions

(LO6) Develop oral presentation and adaptable communication skills

(S1) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations

(S2) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

(S3) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

(S4) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

Contemporary Anti-slavery, Forced Labour and Human Rights (POLI150)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students’ familiarity with contemporary examples of human exploitation analogous with slavery;

To develop students’ analysis of current practice and assist them in drawing reasoned conclusions for future action ;

To contribute to the process of developing anti-slavery and anti-trafficking strategies, amongst governments and NGOs, and raising awareness of issues related to their development .

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Analyse theoretical approaches to contemporary forms of ‘slavery’ and human exploitation.

(LO2) Evaluate the role of scholarly concepts, rhetorical analogies, legal definitions and national or international legislation in identifying and eliminating forms of modern ‘slavery’.

(LO3) Formulate conclusions regarding the role of current practice and the potential for future development in a specific area of voluntary, legislative or enforcement efforts to end contemporary ‘slaveries’.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

Representing Slavery (MODL515)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students' familiarity with historical contexts of slavery and introduce them to potential areas for specialisation;

To engage students in the critical examination of historical representations as sources for our understanding of slaveries and also the purposes for which representations of slavery have been consumed, received and created;

To engage students in the critical examination of later representations as responses to historical slaveries informed by their creators' contemporary concerns.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of slavery as a conceptual category of analysis and the extent to which it aids our understanding of not only experiences of freedom and "un-freedom" but their representation.

(LO2) Develop appropriate disciplinary skills, becoming familiar with a range of techniques, methods and concepts and apply these in the analysis of slaveries and their legacies.

(LO3) Successfully and confidently construct rational argument, and develop expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S5) Information skills - Critical reading

(S6) Information skills - Evaluation

(S7) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

(S8) Information skills - Information accessing: Locating relevant information and Identifying and evaluating information sources

(S9) Research skills - All Information skills

(S10) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

International Slavery Dissertation (HLAC599)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To enable the student to complete a piece of original research to high academic standards.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The ability to develop a reasoned and well-structured argument based on an assessment of both the available evidence and existing scholarly views.

(LO2) Completing a major piece of independent research.

(S1) Demonstrate understanding of the evolution of different models of record keeping theory and practice though awareness of the impact of different political, historical and cultural traditions on record-keeping theory and practice

(S2) Expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.

Optional modules

Research Methods in Politics (POLI138)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module will familiarise students with some of the most commonly used quatitative and qualitative methods for political research. These include questionnaire design, delivery and analysis, interviewing, as well as organisational activities relating to project design and management. In addition, students will be familiarised with the theoretical debates relating to their choice of research methodology with particular reference to the quantitative-qualitative dichotomy and comparative methods.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) By the end of the module, students should have a sound understanding of the theoretical debate surrounding the major methods for research work in the field of politics.

(LO2) Be familiar with the practical dilemmas and tensions connected to research in the field of politics.

(LO3) Be able to to choose appropriate methodological approaches for a particular research project and to work out a suitable research plan.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

Introduction to Critical Theory (MODL503)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to various theoretical frameworks for research in Modern Languages and other disciplines related to the analysis of discourse (textual, visual) and / or other kinds of cultural materials (digital, etc);

To encourage students to consider the range of theoretical and methodological approaches which he or she could adopt in approaching his or her individual research project;

To provide students with an awareness of the key theoretical issues central to cultural studies, and to develop in them an understanding of current methodologies.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will show an understanding of recent theoretical trends in research appropriate to MA level in the fields of languages, literatures and cultures.

(LO2) Students will have acquired the ability to critically evaluate the use made by researchers of theory in framing research questions.

(LO3) Students will be able to critically evaluate the application of a theory or a methodology to a specific field of research in their language area.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing (including referencing skills)

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

(S4) Global citizenship - cultural awareness

(S5) Global citizenship - ethical awareness

Research Skills for Ace M-level Students (ALGY601)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module will provide students with a set of skills that is necessary for the development, structuring and presentation of their dissertation topic (which can be later applied to PhD research) alongside transferable skills (clarity of written expression, critical faculty, advanced level ability to structure and present arguments in a range of media, and project management) applicable to academic and non-academic work environments; The module also aims to develop your abilities to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Show advanced critical understanding of the sources and methodological approaches appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO2) Synthesise arguments and data from published material.

(LO3) Make a critical judgement of the relative strengths and weaknesses of research questions and arguments.

(LO4) Show an awareness of ethical issues in research.

(LO5) Show advanced critical understanding of current historiographical and theoretical debates.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

(S5) Skills in using technology - Online communications skills

"indiana Jones"? the Legacy of Imperial and Colonial Archaeology and Museums (HIST207)
Level2
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students’ awareness of imperialism and colonialism as a vehicle for archaeological exploration and museum building;

To help students gain an understanding of the types of critical theory that can help to contextualize and critique museums exhibitions;

To understand how museum labels are written, and turn them into a more effective vehicle for communicating the full itinerary of the objects being displayed;

To employ a digital platform that will allow students to select images of material artefacts, order them in an exhibition, and link them with narrative to create a unique modern museum display.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence, particularly postcolonial historiography and understand how this affects the work of museums.

(LO2) An ability to investigate and analyse material remains on the basis of provenance and the historical context in which they were collected.

(LO3) An understanding of key ethical and legal problems in the creation of modern archaeology and museums.

(LO4) The ability to curate and narrate an digital exhibition.

(S1) Written communication: Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression.

(S2) Oral communication and confidence: Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression and time-management / pacing of presentations.

(S3) Research: Gathering, analysing and organising information, including both object histories and modern historical events.

(S4) Digital skill: The use of Omeka for the creation of an online exhibition.

Historical Research (HIST527)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To be able to identify theories and concepts from the social sciences, or from literary or gender studies, as appropriate to their subsequent dissertation work;

In addition, graduate students of history need to develop a broad understanding of the nature of the primary sources available to historians in their chosen fields of study, and the range of methodological approaches used in interrogating these primary sources;

This module addresses the location of primary sources and their accessibility, the various strategies devised by historians for analysing them, and the ethical issues raised in the pursuit of historical research. It is designed to enable you to identify, where appropriate, a range of primary sources relating to the field of your proposed dissertation topic in Semester two.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO2) Show an understanding of the issues faced by historians when using primary sources.

(LO3) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(LO4) Critically evaluate historians’ use of theory in framing research questions.

(LO5) Show an understanding of the sources and methodological approach(es) appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO6) Show an awareness of ethical issues in historical research.

(LO7) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(S1) Confidence, independence of mind and time-management

(S2) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S3) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

Themes in History (HIST590)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to provide students with knowledge of a wide range of theoretical, conceptual and methodological themes in History;

The module seeks to meet the requirements of Masters level provision in History by familiarising students with cutting-edge research, offered both by historians within the History department and elsewhere in the University;

In addition, the module seeks to support a wider agenda for research in History by connecting Masters students to the research community of historians at Liverpool, broadly defined, including our numerous Research Centres (Centre for the Study of International Slavery, the Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Worlds) as well as the work of historians in the Departments of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, in the Department of Public Health and Policy, or the Department of Sociology.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the module.

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience.

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(S1) Organisational skills

(S2) Adaptability

(S3) Communication skills

(S4) International awareness

International Slavery Dissertation Proposal (HLAC500)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The feasibility study is designed to ensure that the topic chosen for the dissertation can be undertaken successfully.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of data, case studies, or primary sources, as appropriate to the chosen disciplinary specialism.

(LO2) M-Level academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO3) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present large bodies of evidence and scholarship clearly in written or oral form.

(S1) Skills of written communication and rational argument, drawing on appropriate disciplinary methods.

(S2) Expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.


Please note that the modules listed are representative of those you’ll study and are subject to change.

Further details about the content of individual modules can be provided on request.