International Economic Law LLM/PGDip/PGCert

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2020
  • Entry requirements: You should normally hold a minimum of a 2:1 Honours Degree in Law (BA or LLB) or in a relevant field of study.
International Economic Law LLM

Module details

LLM students on any of the specialist postgraduate taught programmes must study a total of 180 credits from taught modules (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits)

In addition to the mandatory Dissertation and research training module, LLM students must select at least 3 taught specialist modules to the value of 60 credits from the list of module specialisms (see below). These required modules may vary slightly from year to year, and are chosen because of their particular contemporary relevance to the specialism of International Economic Law.

The remaining 60 credits may be taken from any Masters programmes offered by the school, or in any other school with whom a sharing arrangement exists.

Optional modules

Law of the European Single Market (LAW520)
LevelM
Credit level20
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

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Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate principles and techniques of advanced legal research

(LO2) Show an understanding of the relevant social, economic, political, historical, philosophical, ethical, scientific and cultural contexts within which Law of the European Single Market operates

(LO3) Demonstrate that the chosen taught modules have been studied in depth

(LO4) Identify, locate and retrieve source legal materials in Law of the European Single Market, both in paper and electronic form

(LO5) Analyse, evaluate and interpret the principal source materials of Law of the European Single Market, including national statutes, national, European and international law reports, treaties, directives and other relevant materials as appropriate

(LO6) Apply legal knowledge to a practical situation and draw reasoned conclusions supported by legal authority

(LO7) Synthesise information from primary legal sources to achieve detailed knowledge and understanding of the Law of the European Single Market

(LO8) Understand and employ English, European and international legal terminology, both orally and in writing, to explain and convey technical legal information at an advanced level

(LO9) Demonstrate advanced legal skills (e.g. critical analysis) necessary to enable them to reach a superior understanding of Law of the European Single Market, even if not previously studied at undergraduate level

(LO10) Demonstrate thorough knowledge of the legal principles underpinning free movement within the Single Market

(LO11) Demonstrate critical awareness of the broader constitutional, policy and cultural implications of European economic integration

(LO12) Locate and handle appropriate legal and non-legal materials

(LO13) Carry out research in the field of the Single Market

(S1) Develop critical analysis skills

(S2) Utilise problem-solving skills in complex theoretical and practical contexts

(S3) Develop time management and prioritisation skills by working to deadlines

(S4) Develop individual and group communication skills by seminar presentations

(S5) Develop oral discussion skills by participating in debates and problem-solving exercises

(S6) Take responsibility for their own learning

(S7) Develop their skills in reading, analysing and synthesising different viewpoints and presenting their findings/conclusions in clear, comprehensible, structured format, with detailed argumentation where appropriate

(S8) Be able to make a critical judgment of the merits of particular arguments and make a reasoned choice between alternative solutions or arguments

International Dispute Settlement (LAW521)
LevelM
Credit level20
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to the different methods and institutions for resolving disputes in international law, as well as their structure, underlying principles and functioning.

To enable students to examine, analyse and compare the main procedural issues in proceedings before international courts and tribunals.

To enable students to critically appraise both the growth of international adjudication and the contemporary challenges of international dispute resolution.

To enable students to critically read the decisions of international courts and tribunals.

To develop students’ critical understanding of the enforcement capacity of international law.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The student will be able to demonstrate a critical knowledge and understanding of the organisation of international dispute settlement.

(LO2) The student will be able to demonstrate a critical knowledge and understanding of the main international courts and tribunals, their composition, functioning, procedure and governing principles.

(LO3) The student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the commonalities and differences in proceedings before international courts and tribunals.

(LO4) The student will have the ability to critically appraise the contemporary challenges in international adjudication.

(LO5) The student will have developed an understanding of the role of politics in international dispute resolution.

(LO6) The student will have the ability to find, interpret and critically evaluate international judicial decisions

(S1) Critical analysis of complex theoretical and practical questions

(S2) Legal reasoning and argumentation

(S3) Organisational skills

(S4) Teamwork

(S5) Communication skills

Law of the World Trade Organisation (LAW526)
LevelM
Credit level20
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:0
Aims

The module aims to provide a detailed coverage of the rules of the WTO and introduce students to major critical perspectives on international economic regulation. It is designed to develop an understanding of the global rules on trade between nations, resolution of trade disputes, and the conflict between trade and non-trade values, such as human rights, environment and development. The module will be useful for students interested in international business law and public international law.

Learning Outcomes
International Law and Foreign Investment (LAW542)
LevelM
Credit level20
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To stimulate the academic and practical interest of students in a challenging area of law. To encourage and develop analytical thinking, To enable the creation of effective solutions to legally and factually complex problems. To develop the capacity to construct an effective argument, soundly based in critical analysis of the law both orally and in writing To cultivate a range of fundamental legal and transferable skills

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of the institutional and normative foundations of international investment law

(LO2) Evaluate international investment agreements  and their  various implications from a legal perspective

(LO3) Appreciate the role of different dispute settlement agencies and techniques

(LO4) Critically appraise international investment law from the perspective of different groups of states, business interests and other interest groups, including environmental and social interest groups

(LO5) Use and understand complex legal texts, case law, and academic writing to identify solutions for legal and policy issues arising in the application of investment treaties and enforcement of investment arbitration awards

(S1) Research skills - All Information skills

(S2) Improving own learning/performance - Self-awareness/self-analysis

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

Uk Trade Law (LAW545)
LevelM
Credit level20
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:0
Aims

 The module aims: To provide an in-depth specialist knowledge of UK trade law. To provide critical tools for understanding the interaction of the legal and the political as it pertains to UK trade law.  To   provide students with the tools to make sense of critical perspectives on trade, competition and  investment rules as applicable to the UK's economic relations with the EU and globally.  T o develop students' critical analysis and legal reasoning  skills allowing them to  evaluate  and apply knowledge in   a complex and evolving trade environment.  To develop students' ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing. To cultivate a range of fundamental legal and transferrable skills required in a range of occupations involving the development and application of rules and policies on trade an d investment.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate an understanding of the institutional and normative foundations of UK trade law

(LO2) Use and understand complex legal texts, case law, and academic writing to identify solutions for legal and policy issues arising in the application of trade, competition and investment rules

(LO3) Critically appraise UK trade law from the perspective of different groups of states, devolved governments, business interests and other interest groups, including environmental and social interest groups

(LO4) Illustrate an awareness of the interaction of poltical and legal factors in UK trade law

(LO5) Show an ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing

(LO6) Reflect an ability to undertake independent research

(S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

International Trade Law and Public Health (LAW546)
LevelM
Credit level20
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The primary aim of this module isto allow students to develop an in-depth understanding of the closerelationship between European and international trade law and the prevention ofobesity and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and apply the knowledge theywill have gained throughout the course to clearly identified practical casestudies.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will develop a thorough understandingof the challenges that obesity and other chronic diseases pose for individualand population health, sustainable economic growth and social justice.

(LO2) They will develop a refined understanding of how– and to what extent – legal instruments can be used to effectively addressthese challenges. In particular, it will invite students to reflect on thelegal strategies that the food, the alcohol and the tobacco industries haveused to contest the adoption of evidence-based policies intended to promotehealthier lifestyles and prevent obesity and other chronic diseases, and howthey can evaluate their arguments in light of EU internal market, WTO and humanrights law.

(LO3) Students will develop an in-depth understandingof the relationship between EU internal market law and the prevention of obesityand other chronic diseases. In particular, they will understand the powers thatthe EU has at its disposal to harmonise the laws of the Member States toaddress the major NCD risk factors (tobacco, alcohol and unhealthy diets) andwill learn to critically assess how it has used its powers and how this hasaffected the autonomy of EU Member States as primarily responsible for thehealth and well-being of their citizens.

(LO4) Similarly, students will develop a goodunderstanding of the relationship between relevant WTO rules and the preventionof obesity and other chronic diseases.

(LO5) Students will consider a range of specific casestudies which will allow them to  ensure that they have practical examples ofhow relevant EU and WTO rules have been invoked and/or applied.

(S1) Students will develop independent research skills, as they will be required to search for and engage with a broad range of materials (anchored in law and in other disciplines), with a view to understanding EU internal market and WTO law in context.

(S2) Students will strengthen their critical legal skills and learn to apply them to specific, contemporary cases / policy developments involving the regulation of the food, tobacco and alcohol industries and the impact that their outcome may have on public health and chronic diseases prevention.

(S3) Students will develop their ability to search for and rely upon interdisciplinary material and reflect on how legal rules are informed by “evidence” originating from other disciplines (public health, epidemiology, psychology, sociology).

(S4) Students will develop their ability to act as advocates for a given party both in consultation and in litigation exercises. They will learn to represent their clients and adopt the appropriate style to persuade relevant audiences.

(S5) Students will understand the role and the limits that law can play to prevent better health and how it can be framed to this effect. They will therefore reflect on how the law can promote or hinder social justice, health equalities and sustainable development.