History: Eighteenth-Century Worlds MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: October 2020
  • Entry requirements: You should normally have a BA in History or a related discipline (2:1 or above, or international equivalent).
Eighteenth Century Worlds MA

Module details

Compulsory

Approaches to the global Eighteenth-Century century (HIST521)

Historical Research (HIST527)

Revolution and social change: politics, cultures and societies in the Eighteenth-century world (HIST522)

Feasibility Study (HIST504)

Required: Dissertation (HIST550)

Optional Modules

ENGL711 Shakespeare and Co.

ENGL720 Literature and Science I: Science on Stage

ENGL710 Literature and Science II: Science and Imagination

HIST581 Histories of Slavery

ENGL718 Forms of Fiction

ENGL721 Writing Travel 1: Things of Darkness – encountering Africa and the Caribbean

ENGL712 Writing Travel 2:  Old worlds, new worlds

HIST590 Themes in History

HLAC502 Representing Slavery

 

Compulsory modules

Approaches to the Global Eighteenth Century (HIST521)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This is one of the required modules and is designed to introduce students to the range and diversity of the programme's expertise and perspectives on '18th century worlds'. The Global 18th century embraces the diverse cultures and perspectives of the long 18th century (1660-1832). In individual sessions (taught by subject specialists), the student will be encouraged to consider the range of theoretical and methodological approaches which they could adopt in approaching their individual research and in their development of optional modules during the programme. This module aims to deliver an interdisciplinary approach to the subject and emphasises the different approaches that might otherwise be isolated in subject disciplines.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of eighteenth-century worlds

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO5) The acquisition of research-related skills such as literature searches, formulating and evaluating research questions and strategies, the ability to gather, select and organize large quantities of evidence and the critical reading of texts

(LO6) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(S1) Confidence, independence of mind and time-management

(S2) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S3) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S4) Gathering, analysing and organising information

(S5) Digital research skills

(S6) Problem solving, exchanging information and decision-making skills

(S7) Listening, questioning and creative thinking

(S8) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression

(S9) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

(S10) Application of information technology

(S11) Positive attitude, appropriate assertiveness, initiative and self-direction

(S12) Planning and organisational skills

(S13) Understanding, intellectual integrity and being sensitive to different cultures

(S14) Empathy and imaginative insight

Historical Research (HIST527)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To be able to identify theories and concepts from the social sciences, or from literary or gender studies, as appropriate to their subsequent dissertation work;

In addition, graduate students of history need to develop a broad understanding of the nature of the primary sources available to historians in their chosen fields of study, and the range of methodological approaches used in interrogating these primary sources;

This module addresses the location of primary sources and their accessibility, the various strategies devised by historians for analysing them, and the ethical issues raised in the pursuit of historical research. It is designed to enable you to identify, where appropriate, a range of primary sources relating to the field of your proposed dissertation topic in Semester two.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO2) Show an understanding of the issues faced by historians when using primary sources.

(LO3) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(LO4) Critically evaluate historians’ use of theory in framing research questions.

(LO5) Show an understanding of the sources and methodological approach(es) appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO6) Show an awareness of ethical issues in historical research.

(LO7) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(S1) Confidence, independence of mind and time-management

(S2) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S3) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

Revolution and Social Change: Politics, Cultures and Societies in the 18th-century World (HIST522)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To encourage postgraduates to reflect on how revolution and social change within the British, European and colonial North American economies between 1688 and 1840 impacted upon changing lifestyles, political discourse, protest and the material world;

To enable students to analyse the interconnectedness of ideas and the notion of change in North American and European societies within a world context;

To consolidate the critical, research, writing and presentational skills appropriate to higher-level study in the relevant disciplines.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of revolution and change within a global context during the long eighteenth century (1688-1840)

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates in 18th-century studies appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner. 

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a range of sources (historical, literary and visual) for the period 1688-1840 critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship and audience

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO5) The acquisition of research-related skills such as literature searches, formulating and evaluating research questions and strategies, the ability to gather, select and organize large quantities of evidence and the critical reading of texts.

(LO6) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form.

(S1) Good time-keeping and willingness to take responsibility

(S2) Team-work, respect for others' reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information

(S4) Listening, questioning and creative thinking

(S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression

(S6) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

(S7) Application of information technology

(S8) Positive attitude, appropriate assertiveness, initiative and self-direction

(S9) Planning and organisational skills

(S10) Understanding, intellectual integrity and being sensitive to other cultures

(S11) Empathy and imaginative insight

Feasibility Study (HIST504)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The feasibility study is designed to ensure that the topic chosen for the dissertation can be undertaken successfully;

Students will embark on the dissertation with a clear idea of the secondary and primary sources to be consulted;

Students will be aware of the appropriate theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches to be deployed.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have tested the feasibility of the project defined the scope of study and the way the research may be carried out.

(LO2) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the pathway / MA programme.

(LO3) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO4) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO5) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(LO6)  Enhancement of research skills through theprocess of devising an independent research project, defining the scope ofstudy and planning how the research will be carried out.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

(S4) Time and project management - Project planning

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

(S6) Information skills - Critical reading

(S7) Research skills - All Information skills

(S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

(S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Flexibility/Adaptability

Dissertation (HIST550)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To enable the student to complete a piece of original research drawing on relevant primary and secondary source material to publishable standard.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The ability to identify a genuine professional or historical problem or issue, and successfully describe its nature and scope

(LO2) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the pathway/MA programme

(LO3) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO4) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO5) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO6) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form.

(LO7) An ability to demonstrate self-direction and originality in undertaking a piece of independent research culminating in the writing of a dissertation

(LO8) The ability to present a major piece of independent work showing clarity of structure and style and in accordance with appropriate presentation guidelines

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

(S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

(S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

Optional modules

Shakespeare & Co (ENGL711)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

‘Soul of the age’ or ‘not of an age, but for all time’?  The aim of this module is to examine some of the immediate and subsequent ‘cultural contexts’ (linguistic and textual, theatrical and critical) of Shakespeare’s writings, and to develop a greater sensitivity to the play of historical and literary circumstance when unfolding them.  Its specific aims are:  to offer a series of comparative approaches to reading and interpreting Shakespeare both within and beyond his own ‘time’, and against eighteenth-century ideas of him as   the  great English poet of ‘Nature’, ‘Nation’, and ‘Genius’;  to address the plays’ sources, adaptations, and related or relevant works by other writers alongside critical attention to Shakespeare’s contemporaries – especially Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson – as well as to his Restoration and eighteenth-century adapters and ‘improvers’, critics and performers, such as David Garrick and Samuel Johnson;  to add to the students' understanding of literary history, and also of some related aspects of cultural and social history, over the course of both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods; to develop the student's critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in the contexts both of the Renaissance and of the eighteenth century.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) By completion of the module, students should be able:To demonstrate a critical understanding of a range of Shakespeare plays, in relation to the works of a number of other Renaissance and eighteenth-century dramatists, writers, and texts

(LO2) To address Shakespearean drama within a variety of contexts: literary and theatrical, critical and cultural

(LO3) To assess Shakespeare's art as a dramatist in relation to sources and the works of other dramatists, and to examine the adaptation of Shakespere's plays in the Restoration and the eighteenth century

(LO4) To demonstrate an understanding of some of the critical and interpretive debates concerning Shakespeare in performance and adaptation, especially in the Restoration and the eighteenth century

(LO5) To demonstrate an informed critical engagement with some of the relevant literary, cultural and historical contexts of the plays and writings examined

(LO6) To put into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing

(LO7) To research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a more specialised level

(LO8) To evaluate and communicate effectively both their own and others’ ideas

(LO9) To demonstrate an enhanced ability to read and engage critically with literary and, where relevant, historical and cultural sources for both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

(LO10) To demonstrate an enhanced understanding of literary history and of some related aspects of cultural and social history over the course of the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

(LO11) To demonstrate an ability to evaluate critically advanced scholarship and research of the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods. 

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

(S5) Information skills - Critical reading

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

Literature and Science I: Science On Stage (ENGL720)
LevelM
Credit level5
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to: Enhance students' understanding of the relationship between science and the stage in the Renaissance and Eighteenth Century, through the works of authors such as Ben Jonson, Thomas Shadwell, and John Gay. Advance students' critical understanding of literary history, and also of some related aspects of cultural and social history, over the course of both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods. Develop students' critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in the contexts both of the Renaissance and of the Eighteenth century.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) On completion of the module, students will have:The ability to demonstrate a critical understanding of a range of Renaissance and Eighteenth-century dramatic works concerned with science, by key authors from both periods.

(LO2) The ability to assess and discuss the various ways in which dramatic texts of the period engaged with ideas prevalent in ‘scientific’ discourses, and how writers were inspired by and/or critiqued different accounts of nature.

(LO3) The ability to demonstrate an informed critical engagement with some of the relevant literary, cultural and historical contexts of the works examined.

(LO4) The ability to put into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing .

(LO5) The ability to research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a more specialised level.

(LO6) The ability to evaluate and communicate effectively both their own and others’ ideas .

(LO7) An enhanced ability to read and engage critically with literary and, where relevant, historical and cultural sources for both the Renaissance and Eighteenth-century periods.

(LO8) An enhanced understanding of literary history and of some related aspects of cultural and social history over the course of the Renaissance and Eighteenth-century periods.

(LO9) An ability to evaluate critically advanced scholarship and research of the Renaissance and Eighteenth-century periods.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills.

(S5) Information skills - Critical reading.

(S6) Research skills - All information skills.

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.).

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

Literature and Science II: Science and Imagination (ENGL710)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to: Enhance  students' understanding of the relationship between literature and science in the Renaissance and Eighteenth Century, through the works of authors such as Spenser, Bacon, Milton, Boyle, Cavendish, Newton, Swift, Thomson and Barbauld. It will pay particular attention to how emerging ways of knowing and seeing influenced accounts of cosmology and creation, discovery and imagination, politics and poetics. Enhance students' understanding of literary history, and also of some related aspects of cultural and social history, over the course of both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods. Advance   students'  critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in the contexts both of the Renaissance and of the eighteenth century.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) On completion of the module, students will have:The ability to demonstrate a critical understanding of a range of Renaissance and eighteenth-century literary works concerned with science and the examination of 'Nature', by key authors from both periods.

(LO2) The ability to assess and discuss the various ways in which literary texts of the period engaged with ideas prevalent in ‘scientific’ discourses, and how writers were inspired by and/or critiqued different accounts of nature.

(LO3) The ability to demonstrate an informed critical engagement with some of the relevant literary, cultural and historical contexts of the works examined.

(LO4) The ability to put into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing.

(LO5) The ability to research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a more specialised level.

(LO6) The ability to evaluate and communicate effectively both their own and others’ ideas.

(LO7) The ability to read and engage critically with literary and, where relevant, historical and cultural sources for both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

(LO8) An enhanced understanding of literary history and of some related aspects of cultural and social history over the course of the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

(LO9) The ability to evaluate critically advanced scholarship and research of the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills.

(S4) Information skills - Critical reading.

(S5) Research skills - All Information skills.

(S6) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.).

(S7) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

Histories of Slavery (HIST581)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students' familiarity with historical contexts for slavery and introduce them to potential areas for specialisation;

To introduce comparative concepts and ideas of "slavery", "freedom" and "forced labour" for students reflecting on their context in very different historical societies;

To allow staff and students to benefit from ambitious and broad discussion of slavery as a concept beyond discrete research contexts.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A sophisticated understanding of slavery as a conceptual category of analysis and the extent to which it aids our understanding of contemporary and historical experiences of freedom and "un-freedom".

(LO2) Appropriate disciplinary skills, becoming familiar with a range of techniques, methods and concepts deployed in the analysis of slaveries and their legacies.

(LO3) Knowledge of "slavery" in a wide variety of historical and contemporary contexts.

(S1) Skills of written communication and rational argument, drawing on appropriate disciplinary methods.

(S2) Expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.

(S3) Confident and constructive oral argument.

Contesting Fictions: From Romance to the Novel (ENGL718)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to help students to develop an informed and sophisticated understanding of a selection of Renaissance and 18th-century works of fiction.  It allows for the detailed study of prose romances and tales from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and also of the version of ‘Romance’ most popular in the late eighteenth century: the ‘Gothic novel’, with which the period was especially fascinated.  Emphasis will be placed initially upon the history of prose fiction and the emergence of the ‘novel’ as a literary form, and the module will examine works by a number of writers from George Gascoigne and Thomas Nashe to Samuel Richardson and Ann Radcliffe.  It aims to address how prose narrative across both periods relates to issues of gender, identity, and the ‘self’ as well as the stuff of sensationalism, and it asks why, for example, ‘Romance’ and later the novel have traditionally been considered ‘feminine’ – and not always reputable – forms.  Students will be expected to familiarise themselves with relevant literary, cultural and historical contexts of the works examined. There will be guidance concerning useful contemporary critical material and contextual works.  By completion of the module, students should feel confident in developing critical readings of a selection of Renaissance and 18th-century fictions, set in appropriate contexts.

The module aims to add to the student''s understanding of literary history, and also of some related aspects of cultural and social history, over the course of both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

The module aims to develop the student''s critical awareness of the problems and insights raised by an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature in the contexts both of the Renaissance and of the eighteenth century.

Learning Outcomes

By completion of the module, students should be able:

- to demonstrate a critical understanding of a range of Renaissance and eighteenth-century literary works of fiction, romance, and the early novel by key authors of both periods

- to demonstrate an understanding of some early modern ideas and debates concerning fiction, romance, and the novel, as well as some of the contexts for these issues

- to demonstrate an informed critical engagement with some of the relevant literary, cultural and historical contexts of the works examined

- to put into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and writing

- to research, read, and think both independently and sensitively about the works studied at a
more specialised level

- to evaluate and communicate effectively both their own and others’ ideas

- to demonstrate an enhanced ability to read and engage critically with literary and, where relevant, historical and cultural sources for both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

- to demonstrate an enhanced understanding of literary history and of some related aspects of cultural and social history over the course of the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

-to demonstrate an ability to evaluate critically advanced scholarship and research of the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods. 

Writing Travel 1: Things of Darkness - Encountering Africa and the Caribbean (ENGL721)
LevelM
Credit level5
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to texts of both real and imaginary travel produced in Renaissance and eighteenth century England by focussing on one specific region – Africa and the Caribbean. It aims to investigate the ways in which such texts engaged with real cultural and political changes, including England’s connections with other nations in both the Old World and the New, and the construction of concepts such as ‘Englishness’ and the ‘foreign’ To add to the student's understanding of literary history, and introduce them to ways of using interdisciplinary research in cultural and social history to illuminate literary texts. To develop the student's critical awareness of key theoretical debates about cross-cultural interaction, otherness and travel writing.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Develop introductory graduate-level knowledge of Renaissance and eighteenth-century literary works and genres concerning travel and exploration.

(LO2) Develop an understanding of some early modern ideas and debates concerning travel, identity, and the 'foreign', as well as some of the contexts for these issues.

(LO3) Develop an informed critical engagement with some of the relevant literary, cultural and historical contexts of the works examined.

(LO4) Develop an enhanced ability to read and engage critically with literary and, where relevant, historical and cultural sources for both the Renaissance and eighteenth-century periods.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

(S3) Information skills - Critical reading.

(S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness.

(S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative.

(S6) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility.

Writing Travel 2: Old Worlds, New Worlds (ENGL712)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to introduce students to texts of both real and imaginary travel produced in Renaissance and eighteenth-century England. By juxtaposing texts from England’s pre-colonial encounters with other nations to the records of eighteenth century Grand Tours and colonial engagements, the module will offer students an opportunity to explore questions such as the relationship between travel writing and nationalism, the influence of travel on literary genres, as well as the involvement of such textual records in the formation of England’s imperialist ambition in these periods. There will be study of the construction of concepts such as 'Englishness' and 'the foreign', and of cross-cultural interactions.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Ability to demonstrate a critical understanding of a range of Renaissance and eighteenth-century literary works and genres concerning travel and exploration by key authors of both periods.

(LO2) Ability to demonstrate an understanding of the key contemporaneous ideas and debates concerning travel, identity, and the 'foreign'.

(LO3) Ability to demonstrate an informed critical engagement with some of the relevant literary, cultural and historical contexts of the works examined.

(LO4) Ability to put into practice advanced skills in textual analysis, critical reading, and the ability to research, read, and think independently and sensitively about the works studied at an appropriately specialised level.

(LO5) Ability to evaluate and communicate effectively ideas drawn from observation and from scholarship.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written.

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S4) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness.

(S5) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative.

(S6) Personal attributes and qualities - Willingness to take responsibility.

Themes in History (HIST590)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to provide students with knowledge of a wide range of theoretical, conceptual and methodological themes in History;

The module seeks to meet the requirements of Masters level provision in History by familiarising students with cutting-edge research, offered both by historians within the History department and elsewhere in the University;

In addition, the module seeks to support a wider agenda for research in History by connecting Masters students to the research community of historians at Liverpool, broadly defined, including our numerous Research Centres (Centre for the Study of International Slavery, the Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Worlds) as well as the work of historians in the Departments of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, in the Department of Public Health and Policy, or the Department of Sociology.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the module.

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience.

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(S1) Organisational skills

(S2) Adaptability

(S3) Communication skills

(S4) International awareness

Representing Slavery (HLAC502)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students' familiarity with historical contexts for slavery and introduce them to potential areas for specialisation.

To engage students in the critical examination of historical representations as sources for our understanding of slaveries and also the purposes for which representations of slavery have been consumed, received and created.

To engage students in the critical examination of later representations as responses to historical slaveries informed by their creators' contemporary concerns.

Learning Outcomes

Subject learning outcomes

A sophisticated understanding of slavery as a conceptual category of analysis and the extent to which it aids our understanding of not only experiences of freedom and "un-freedom" but their representation.

Appropriate disciplinary skills, becoming familiar with a range of techniques, methods and concepts deployed in the analysis of slaveries and their legacies.

Knowledge of "slavery" and the ways for which it was represented in a wide variety of historical and contemporary contexts.

Skills and other attributes

Skills of written communication and rational argument, drawing on appropriate disciplinary methods.

Expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.

Confident and constructive oral argument.


Please note that the modules listed are representative of those you’ll study and are subject to change.

Further details about the content of individual modules can be provided on request.