History: Cultural History MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: October 2020
  • Entry requirements: You should normally have a BA in History or a related discipline (2:1 or above, or international equivalent).

Module details

Compulsory modules

Themes in Cultural History (HIST516)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to a range of key themes in cultural history and to consider how historians have studied those themes with reference to a series of particular case-studies;

To explore relevant concepts and approaches in cultural history;

To engage in the critical evaluation of historical and theoretical texts.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of Cultural History

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO5) The acquisition of research-related skills such as literature searches, formulating and evaluating research questions and strategies, the ability to gather, select and organize large quantities of evidence and the critical reading of texts

(LO6) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(S1) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S2) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression

(S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

(S6) Positive attitude, appropriate assertiveness, initiative and self-direction

(S7) Planning and organisational skills

(S8) Understanding, intellectual integrity and being sensitive to different cultures

(S9) Empathy and imaginative insight

Sources of Cultural History (HIST520)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to a broad range of sources associated with the study of cultural history, including aspects of visual and material culture, film and the mass media, and written texts;

To explore ongoing historiographical and theoretical debates over approaches to and interpretations of primary sources;

To engage in the critical evaluation of primary sources.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key approaches and sources in the study of Cultural History.

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO5) The acquisition of research-related skills such as literature searches, formulating and evaluating research questions and strategies, the ability to gather, select and organize large quantities of evidence and the critical reading of texts

(LO6) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(S1) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S2) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of oral expression

(S5) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

(S6) Positive attitude, appropriate assertiveness, initiative and self-direction

(S7) Planning and organisational skills

(S8) Understanding, intellectual integrity and being sensitive to different cultures

(S9) Empathy and imaginative insight

Feasibility Study (HIST504)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The feasibility study is designed to ensure that the topic chosen for the dissertation can be undertaken successfully;

Students will embark on the dissertation with a clear idea of the secondary and primary sources to be consulted;

Students will be aware of the appropriate theoretical frameworks and methodological approaches to be deployed.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have tested the feasibility of the project defined the scope of study and the way the research may be carried out.

(LO2) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the pathway / MA programme.

(LO3) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO4) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO5) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(LO6)  Enhancement of research skills through theprocess of devising an independent research project, defining the scope ofstudy and planning how the research will be carried out.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

(S4) Time and project management - Project planning

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

(S6) Information skills - Critical reading

(S7) Research skills - All Information skills

(S8) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

(S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Flexibility/Adaptability

Dissertation (HIST550)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To enable the student to complete a piece of original research drawing on relevant primary and secondary source material to publishable standard.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The ability to identify a genuine professional or historical problem or issue, and successfully describe its nature and scope

(LO2) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the pathway/MA programme

(LO3) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner

(LO4) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience

(LO5) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations

(LO6) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form.

(LO7) An ability to demonstrate self-direction and originality in undertaking a piece of independent research culminating in the writing of a dissertation

(LO8) The ability to present a major piece of independent work showing clarity of structure and style and in accordance with appropriate presentation guidelines

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Personal action planning

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S3) Time and project management - Personal organisation

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Creative thinking

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

(S9) Personal attributes and qualities - Initiative

(S10) Personal attributes and qualities - Resilience

Optional modules

Historical Research (HIST527)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To be able to identify theories and concepts from the social sciences, or from literary or gender studies, as appropriate to their subsequent dissertation work;

In addition, graduate students of history need to develop a broad understanding of the nature of the primary sources available to historians in their chosen fields of study, and the range of methodological approaches used in interrogating these primary sources;

This module addresses the location of primary sources and their accessibility, the various strategies devised by historians for analysing them, and the ethical issues raised in the pursuit of historical research. It is designed to enable you to identify, where appropriate, a range of primary sources relating to the field of your proposed dissertation topic in Semester two.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO2) Show an understanding of the issues faced by historians when using primary sources.

(LO3) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(LO4) Critically evaluate historians’ use of theory in framing research questions.

(LO5) Show an understanding of the sources and methodological approach(es) appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO6) Show an awareness of ethical issues in historical research.

(LO7) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form

(S1) Confidence, independence of mind and time-management

(S2) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S3) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

Historical Research (HIST507)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To be able to identify theories and concepts from the social sciences, or from literary or gender studies, as appropriate to their subsequent dissertation work. In addition, graduate students of history need to develop a broad understanding of the nature of the primary sources available to historians in their chosen fields of study, and the range of methodological approaches used in interrogating these primary sources. This module addresses the location of primary sources and their accessibility, the various strategies devised by historians for analysing them, and the ethical issues raised in the pursuit of historical research. It is designed to enable you to identify, where appropriate, a range of primary sources relating to the field of your proposed dissertation topic in Semester two.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO2) Show an understanding of the issues faced by historians when using primary sources.

(LO3) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(LO4) Critically evaluate historians’ use of theory in framing research questions.

(LO5) Show an understanding of the sources and methodological approach(es) appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO6) Show an awareness of ethical issues in historical research

(LO7) An ability to develop arguments that systematically and creatively organize, synthesize and present clearly large bodies of historical and literary material in written and oral form.

(S1) Confidence, independence of mind and time-management

(S2) Good time-keeping and readiness to accept responsibility

(S3) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

Using the Science Fiction Archive (ENGL730)
LevelM
Credit level5
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module will introduce students to the concept of a literary archive and the importance of context and evidence in presenting an argument about a literary text. It will enable students to develop an understanding of science fiction as a literature which develops and changes over time. It will offer practical experience of research methods and strategies.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have been introduced to a major research collection and will have developed a sense of its contents and value to its field.

(LO2) Students will have a critical understanding of science fiction as a mode that enables readers and writers to reflect upon their contemporary aspirations and anxieties.

(LO3) Students will have had practical experience inreflecting upon and discussing the value of archival materials such as manuscripts, letters, and ephemeral material.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S5) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

Science Fiction and the Contemporary (ENGL731)
LevelM
Credit level10
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to introduce students to the field of science fiction writing, and some of its dominant themes and tropes. Enable students to consider how imaginative and speculative writing responds to its time and place of production. Demonstrate the ways in which science fiction texts articulate issues of “the contemporary”.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) By the end of this module, students will be able to demonstrate advanced skills in textual analysis of a range of science fiction works with detailed attention to questions of genre, form and narrative structure

(LO2) Analyse with a sophisticated conceptual grasp how science fiction texts engage with and articulate ideas of time, and in particular, “the contemporary”

(LO3) Demonstrate a systematic understanding of ways in which science fiction texts are historically and culturally situated, reflecting their time and/or place of production

(LO4) Critically engage with academic research and/or theoretical discourses, and relate these to specific science fiction texts

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Listening skills

(S5) Information skills - Critical reading

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S8) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

Histories of Slavery (HIST581)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students' familiarity with historical contexts for slavery and introduce them to potential areas for specialisation;

To introduce comparative concepts and ideas of "slavery", "freedom" and "forced labour" for students reflecting on their context in very different historical societies;

To allow staff and students to benefit from ambitious and broad discussion of slavery as a concept beyond discrete research contexts.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A sophisticated understanding of slavery as a conceptual category of analysis and the extent to which it aids our understanding of contemporary and historical experiences of freedom and "un-freedom".

(LO2) Appropriate disciplinary skills, becoming familiar with a range of techniques, methods and concepts deployed in the analysis of slaveries and their legacies.

(LO3) Knowledge of "slavery" in a wide variety of historical and contemporary contexts.

(S1) Skills of written communication and rational argument, drawing on appropriate disciplinary methods.

(S2) Expertise in identifying and deploying appropriate evidence to support analysis and conclusions.

(S3) Confident and constructive oral argument.

Themes in History (HIST590)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to provide students with knowledge of a wide range of theoretical, conceptual and methodological themes in History;

The module seeks to meet the requirements of Masters level provision in History by familiarising students with cutting-edge research, offered both by historians within the History department and elsewhere in the University;

In addition, the module seeks to support a wider agenda for research in History by connecting Masters students to the research community of historians at Liverpool, broadly defined, including our numerous Research Centres (Centre for the Study of International Slavery, the Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Worlds) as well as the work of historians in the Departments of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, in the Department of Public Health and Policy, or the Department of Sociology.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A systematic knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of key themes and approaches in the study of the field covered by the module.

(LO2) An ability to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

(LO3) An ability to interpret and evaluate a diverse range of primary source material critically and empathetically, while addressing questions of content, genre, authorship, and audience.

(LO4) The acquisition of practical academic skills, demonstrated through task-based activities including compiling a bibliography, writing and discussing essays, adopting correct citation practice, leading workshops and giving oral presentations.

(S1) Organisational skills

(S2) Adaptability

(S3) Communication skills

(S4) International awareness

Postmodernism (ENGL727)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to: Enhance students' skills in textual analysis and written composition  Advance students' understanding of theoretical and contextual elements of postmodernism and postmodern fiction  Develop independent and original approaches to evaluating and critically analysing complex issues related to postmodernism

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will demonstrate a critical appreciation of the debates around postmodernism, its cultural, historical and theoretical status.

(LO2) Students will demonstrate advanced textual analysis of a range of postmodern fiction.

(LO3) Students will critically evaluate current scholarship and research related to postmodernism.

(LO4) Students will effectively handle complex concepts and engage with them through independent, critical analysis in an extended written assessment.

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S4) Information skills - Critical reading

Media, Culture and the City (COMM320)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide an introduction into the different ways that cities and urban life are represented, experienced, and engaged with as spaces of culture.

To explore the mediation of cities from a number of strategic perspectives, encompassing both representations of cities 'in media' (e.g. film, advertising, maps, museum displays) and media 'in cities' (e.g. billboards /urban screens, locating filming, mobile and 'locative' screen media).

To introduce students to a wide range of key perspectives and debates on cites from across the film, media and cultural studies literature.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of some of the core theories and concepts on cities and urban space in the media and cultural studies literature.

(LO2) Students will be able to understand and apply these theories to specific examples and case studies.

(LO3) Students will be familiar with debates on the role of culture in processes of urban regeneration and renewal.

(LO4) Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the impact of digital cultures and technologies in shaping perceptions, experiences and the consumption of cities.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

Media and Human Rights (COMM724)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To examine key debates relating to the interaction between news media and human rights. To critically understand the changing nature of human rights representation and the role media play in representing and responding to critical human rights issues. To subject the underlying rationale for media representation and reporting of critical human rights issues to scrutiny. To assess and examine specific cases of media and human rights interaction.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will develop and demonstrate an advanced understanding of the key theories of human rights and the development of international norms of human rights.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse and compare the political and institutional structures involved in addressing human rights.

(LO3) Students will be familiar with and critically evaluate the historical and current changes in the relations between media and human rights.

(LO4) Students will be able to understand and critically explore a range of salient media issues which relate specifically to the definition, construction, protection or abuse of human rights.

(LO5) Students will acquire in-depth knowledge and assess, using case studies, specific issues that are problematising and, at times, re-defining the relations between media and human rights.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

(S3) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

(S5) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information.

(S6) Research management

Media, Culture and Everyday Life (COMM733)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To examine key theories and debates relating to the impact of impact of cultures of communication and media on everyday life in the digital age.

To develop a critical understanding of the relationship between media, modernity and everyday experience.

To develop a reflexive understanding of the role of digital technologies and media in contemporary social and cultural life.

To explore the role of digital media cultures and spaces in relation to issues of globalisation, consumption, and transnational/translocal mobility.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of key theories and debates relating to the impact of cultures of communication and media on everyday life.

(LO2) Students will be able to critically analyse theoretical approaches to media, modernity and everyday experience.

(LO3) Students will gain a reflexive understanding of the role of digital technologies and media in contemporary social and cultural life.

(LO4) Students will be able to display practical understanding of digital media cultures in relation to key themes explored in the module.

(S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations.

(S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information.

(S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning.

(S5) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others.


Please note that the modules listed are representative of those you’ll study and are subject to change.

Further details about the content of individual modules can be provided on request.