Classics and Ancient History MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2020
  • Entry requirements: The normal requirement for entry on to a taught programme is a good 2:1 or equivalent undergraduate degree in a relevant field of study.
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Module details

Students on the MA Classics and Ancient History programme complete:

• Dissertation: (4 units = 60 credits)

• Required/Compulsory Modules: (4 units = 60 credits)

• Optional Taught Modules: (4 units = 60 credits)

Compulsory modules

Ace MA and MSc Dissertation (ALGY600)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterSummer (June-September)
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to give you the opportunity to produce a lengthy piece of work ( 15000-20000 words *) on a topic of your choice. * Footnotes, bibliography and appendices are included in the word count; The module dissertation will enhance your abilities in the realms of collection, analysis and interpretation of primary material, and the development of critical response in the use of secondary sources; The purpose of the MA dissertation is to demonstrate that you can identify an issue or problem, research, assemble and analyse the available evidence, present convincing and coherent arguments on the basis of that evidence, and locate the results within the broader context of modern scholarship. The dissertation should be based at least in part on primary data or sources, and the choice of topic must take into account the accessibility of such materials.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Identify a research-related issue or problem.

(LO2) Design and conduct a scheme of work to explore that issue.

(LO3) Assemble, analyse and appropriately cite both academic literature (references) and primary evidence (sources).

(LO4) Present a coherent and clear set of data and arguments in order to analyse and interpret the data.

(LO5) Use evidence to unfold a continuous and coherent argument that will enable them to make conclusions relating to the problem stated in the introduction of the dissertation.

(S1) Produce a text written and presented to a professional standard

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S4) Time and project management - Project management

Research Skills for Ace M-level Students (ALGY601)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module will provide students with a set of skills that is necessary for the development, structuring and presentation of their dissertation topic (which can be later applied to PhD research) alongside transferable skills (clarity of written expression, critical faculty, advanced level ability to structure and present arguments in a range of media, and project management) applicable to academic and non-academic work environments; The module also aims to develop your abilities to engage with current historiographical and theoretical debates appropriate to MA level in an informed, analytical and critical manner.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Show advanced critical understanding of the sources and methodological approaches appropriate to specific research topics.

(LO2) Synthesise arguments and data from published material.

(LO3) Make a critical judgement of the relative strengths and weaknesses of research questions and arguments.

(LO4) Show an awareness of ethical issues in research.

(LO5) Show advanced critial understanding of current historiographical and theoretical debates.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - visual

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S4) Time and project management - Personal organisation

(S5) Skills in using technology - Online communications skills

Concepts and Controversies (CLAH856)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

·          To engage with key concepts and controversies in the contemporary study of Classical antiquity through specialist scholarship ·          To provide an introduction to the wide stream of intellectual debate and to a range of topic, theoretical and methodological approaches in the field of Classics and Ancient History, within the context of current research at Liverpool ·          To prepare students for examining concepts and controversies and identifying and adopting appropriate approaches in their dissertation research in an independent and sophisticated fashion

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To understand with a range of concepts and controversies at the heart of contemporary research into Classics and Ancient History as encountered in specialist scholarship and to recognize their utility for advanced study

(LO2) To be familiar with a range of topical, theoretical and methodological approaches and appreciate how and when they might be deployed strategically to analyse ancient written, visual, and archaeological material and to interpret Classical antiquity

(LO3) To identify core issues and approaches relevant to a dissertation research topic and to assess the applicability of concepts, theories, and methods when planning that research with some sophistication

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of specialist scholarship to develop logical perspectives and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms for different audiences and purposes, with the aid of information and communications technologies

(S3) Research planning: the identification of a research problem, the identification and evaluation of resources and of strategies for its interrogation, and the setting of an agenda and an approach to bring the problem to solution.

(S4) Independence: readiness for independent learning, including an ability to identify relevant resources and pursue effective strategies in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding

Research Event (CLAH854)
Level1
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

·          To engage in the ‘real life’ task of organizing and participating in a research event ·          To develop skills in event organization, teamwork, leadership and management ·          To contribute to the development of research in a live topic of debate in the field of Classics and Ancient History

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To be able to work individually and in a team to organize and host an event, from initial conception and planning through to execution, whilst managing a small budget

(LO2) To develop knowledge and understanding of a key theme in Classics and Ancient History by critically engaging with and building upon prior and current research

(LO3) To reflect critically upon individual contributions to group activities to improve future performance

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of data and specialist scholarship to develop logical and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: speaking confidently in groups and on an individual basis with different people in formal and informal settings, and adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms

(S3) Research: the identification of sources and resources, the collection and manipulation of data, and the presentation of results, with the aid of information and communications technologies

(S4) Working in groups and individually to set and achieve goals, identifying appropriate resources and techniques, taking on supportive and leadership roles, and managing time to complete tasks to professional standards and bring projects to fruition

(S5) Event organization: planning, costing, scheduling, organizing, advertising and running an event on a small budget

Optional modules

Truth and Lies (CLAH851)
Level1
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To interrogate the conceptual distinction between truth and lies and the ways ancient historians, politicians, poets, authors and common people used ‘facts’ and ‘fictions’ to reflect on their experiences and the world they inhabited;

To investigate how truth and lies intersects within texts that are crucial to our understanding of the ancient world, grappling with a range of documentary and literary material and exploring the diverse social and political contexts in which they were written and read;

To examine how modern engagements with the Classical world navigate the line between ‘truth’ and ‘lies’ and to reflect on how understanding the ancient world can help us navigate the modern phenomena of ‘fake news’ and ‘alternative facts’.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To recognize how truth and lies are mediated by writers of ancient texts to represent and interrogate the past and present, real or imagined

(LO2) To become familiar with and critically evaluate a diverse range of written material from Classical antiquity, including (for example) monumental inscriptions, historiography, biography, the novel, religious treatises, and epic poetry, in all their complexity and contexts

(LO3) To engage with specialist scholarship on the history and literature of Classical antiquity and deploy it to build advanced in-depth knowledge and understanding of the intersection between truth and lies in ancient politics and society

(LO4) To be able to formulate a research question, present key ideas and themes in oral presentation, and respond to feedback; and to undertake independent research and communicate the results in writing

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of data and specialist scholarship to develop logical and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms for different audiences and purposes

(S3) Research: the identification of sources and resources, the collection and manipulation of data, and the presentation of results, with the aid of information and communications technologies

(S4) Independence: self-direction and autonomy in the conception, implementation, pursuit and completion of tasks at a professional level

(S5) Sensitivity to diversity: understanding of and respect for different intellectual positions and other cultures, based on awareness of complexity and sensitivity to context

The Body (CLAH852)
Level1
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To explore the body as a locus of individual experience in Classical antiquity and to investigate how perceptions of the body impact upon the way individuals processed and understood their experiences in the context of ancient patterns of behaviour and beliefs;

To examine via the prism of the body ancient Greek and Roman society from perspectives such as health and medicine, gender and sexuality, citizenship and status, and philosophy and religion, as well as the significance of the ‘Classical’ body in post-antique societies;

To engage with a wide range of written and visual material from ancient Greece and Rome, including poetry, prose, letters, physicans’ reports, inscriptions and sculptures, as well as modern manifestations of the Classical body.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To recognize the body as a site of human experience and as conceived and represented within ancient Greece and Rome.

(LO2) To become familiar with and critically evaluate a wide range of written and visual material from Classical antiquity, including representational, technical and personal texts (poetry and prose), as well as images and objects, that illustrate how the body constitutes human experience and is constituted within societies, in all their complexity and contexts

(LO3) To engage with specialist scholarship about the body in antiquity and deploy it to build advanced in-depth knowledge and understanding of aspects of historical experience and society in ancient Greece and Rome

(LO4) To be able to formulate a research question, present key ideas and themes in oral presentation, and respond to feedback; and to undertake independent research communicate the results in writing

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of data and specialist scholarship to develop logical and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms for different audiences and purposes

(S3) Research: the identification of sources and resources, the collection and manipulation of data, and the presentation of results, with the aid of information and communications technologies

(S4) Independence: self-direction and autonomy in the conception, implementation, pursuit and completion of tasks at a professional level

(S5) Sensitivity to diversity: understanding of and respect for different intellectual positions and other cultures, based on awareness of complexity and sensitivity to context

Spaces and Places (CLAH853)
Level1
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

·          To examine the relationship between the ancient Greeks and Romans and the spaces they built, occupied, moved in and imagined ·          To explore how people in antiquity experienced, interacted with and conceptualized their immediate by engaging with a diverse body of written material, objects, and archaeological remains ·          To investigate the importance of spaces in establishing understanding of other peoples and other ways of living, reflected in different experiences and ideologies ‘at home’, and to understand how ancient landscapes have shaped post-antique engagements with the ‘other worlds’ of Classical antiquity

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To appreciate the relationship between the ancient Greeks and Romans and the spaces and places they build, occupied, moved in and imagined, with attention to their experiences and identities

(LO2) To become familiar with and critically evaluate a wide range of written and visual material relevant to the study of spaces and places in Classical antiquity, from including poetry, geography, ethnography, historiography, itineraries, visual artefacts and physical remains, in all their complexity and contexts

(LO3) To engage with specialist scholarship about landscapes, real and imagined, in antiquity and deploy it to build advanced in-depth knowledge and understanding of historical experience and society in ancient Greece and Rome

(LO4) To be able to formulate a research question, present key ideas and themes in oral presentation, and respond to feedback; and to undertake independent research communicate the results in writing

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of data and specialist scholarship to develop logical and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms for different audiences and purposes

(S3) Research: the identification of sources and resources, the collection and manipulation of data, and the presentation of results, with the aid of information and communications technologies

(S4) Independence: self-direction and autonomy in the conception, implementation, pursuit and completion of tasks at a professional level

(S5) Sensitivity to diversity: understanding of and respect for different intellectual positions and other cultures, based on awareness of complexity and sensitivity to context

Praise and Blame (CLAH858)
Level1
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

·          To explore praise and blame in Classical antiquity across a range of social and political contexts from Archaic Greece through to Imperial Rome, and into ·          To examine a variety of written texts that convey praise or blame, including epic and epinician poetry, comedy, philosophy, oratory, inscriptions, letters and panygeric. ·          To engage with theoretical approaches to praise and blame in antiquity and the present-day, adopting a comparative perspective

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To recognize modes, strategies and theories of praise and blame in ancient Greece and Rome and there significance in the negotiation of relationships, personal and political, and in the construction of values

(LO2) To become familiar with and critically evaluate a diverse range of written material from Classical antiquity, including epic and epinician poetry, drama, philosophy, oratory, letters, biography, panegyric and inscriptions, in all their complexity and contexts

(LO3) To engage with specialist scholarship and deploy it to build advanced in-depth knowledge and understanding of the cultural importance of praise and blame in Classical antiquity

(LO4) To be able to formulate a research question, present key ideas and themes in oral presentation, and respond to feedback; and to undertake independent research and communicate the results in writing

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of data and specialist scholarship to develop logical and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms for different audiences and purposes

(S3) Research: the identification of sources and resources, the collection and manipulation of data, and the presentation of results, with the aid of information and communications technologies

(S4) Independence: self-direction and autonomy in the conception, implementation, pursuit and completion of tasks at a professional level

(S5) Sensitivity to diversity: understanding of and respect for different intellectual positions and other cultures, based on awareness of complexity and sensitivity to context

Themes in the Archaeology of Roman Britain (ALGY634)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim of this module is to explore some of those areas in which the 'new' Roman archaeology is making a fresh and distinctive contribution to our understanding of Britian in first five centuries of the first millennium A.D. A number of themes which might be explored include urbanisation, aspects of the relationship between military and civilian structures, the economy, and religion and how these various themes relate to the debate about the depth and direction of the acculturation of the Roman province.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will continue to develop and deepen their knowledge of experience of Roman Britain, derived either from previous Roman modules and/or the methods and techniques of historical archaeology.

(LO2) Critical understanding of the nature of the discipline will now be based on the work of recent decades and will focus more on research strategies and theory than by the repetition of the accepted chronological and thematic framework for a narrative description.

(LO3) Their appreciation of the range of influences on the subject will lead to a better understanding of archaeology as a whole and of the cross-disciplinary nature of scholarly research in general. In particular they will learn to use Roman archaeology as a vehicle for studying processes which have a great deal of modern relevance, including acculturation, the relationship between town and country and the ways that archaeology can illustrate and explain both common and disparate cultural traditions in north-west Europe.

(LO4) On successful completion of this module, students should have gained an appreciation of the range of scope and high quality of the archaeological evidence for the study of Roman Britain.

(LO5) Students will have enhanced their understanding of the history of the province.

(LO6) Students will have acquired an appreciation of some of the current 'theoretical' debates in Romano-British studies.

(LO7) Students will have developed transferable skills in terms of presentational skills by means of class presentations and follow-up discussions.

(S1) Communication skills

(S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S3) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

(S4) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

Researching Urban Communities in the Near East, 5000-500 B.c (ALGY646)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The nature and development of urban communities are issues central to an understanding of modern day life. Throughout the module it is intended that students will examine concepts of urbanism in an advanced fashion. Students will also engage in critical evaluation of research strategies and analytical approaches that allow us to appreciate the development and nature of early urban communities in the Near East through the archaeological and textual record. By 3000 BC the Near East had witnessed the appearance of the world's first cities and states.  This module investigates concepts and analytical methods suited to the analysis of these early cities on the basis of archaeological evidence .  In particular, this module aims to go beyond the traditional archaeological focus on external catalysts for initial urbanisation and look instead at the relations that constitute cities and how these might be both reflected in and shaped by the forms, layouts, and structures of urban settlements.  This aim requires students to grasp core concepts regarding the spatial organisation of cities; To appreciate the problems and potential of both the available archaeological and textual data; To develop a critical analytical sense of how primary archaeological examples might be analysed in order to form arguments regarding the nature, form and development of cities in the ancient Near East; To learn to utilise key tools, especially software, designed to facilitate the spatial analysis of archaeological site plans.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students successfully completing the module will achieve an understanding of key research issues in Near Eastern archaeology and studies of urbanism.

(LO2) Students  successfully completing the module will have engaged with relevant primary source data.

(LO3) Students successfully completing the module will themselves have conducted research relevant to these issues on a smallscale.

(LO4) Students successfully completing the module will have gained a basic critical understanding of tools and methods relevant to the study of urban forms and structures in the ancient Near East.

(S1) Numeracy/computational skills - Problem solving

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Problem identification

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S7) Skills in using technology - Using common applications (work processing, databases, spreadsheets etc.)

(S8) Research skills - All Information skills

Issues in Egyptian Settlement Archaeology (ALGY676)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module is designed to promote key skills in the collection, analysis and interpretation of primary material (archaeological and textual) relevant to a reconstruction of the nature and organisation of settlement in ancient Egypt; It will use detailed case-studies to encourage students to develop their ability to formulate and present independent argument using this archaeological and textual material as data; It will further encourage the presentation o f such argument and analysis in a coherent format as might be appropriate for publication.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An understanding of the primary material (archaeological and textual) relevant to a reconstruction of the nature and organisation of settlement in ancient Egypt.

(LO2) An understanding of theoretical approaches which have been applied in the study of settlement archaeology in Egypt.

(LO3) The ability to formulate and present independent argument using this archaeological and textual material as data.

(LO4) The ability to present this argument and analysis in a format as might be suitable for academic publication.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

Regionalism in Archaic Greek World (ALGY689)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Introduction to key themes in the archaeology of Archaic Greece; Regional case study of one area of the Archaic Greek world, examining a range of key issues including state formation, identity, religion, inter-state warfare, and cultural interaction; Introduce principal forms of Greek art and architecture of the Geometric and Archaic periods, with their stylistic development and social context, and local varients thereof within the case study region.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Outline the broad chronological, geographical and historical framework of the Archaic Greek world (and associated regions)

(LO2) Identify the principal forms of material culture that archaeologists utilise to understand the Archaic Greek world

(LO3) Discuss key concepts such as state formation, identity, and acculturation and outline the processes of societal interaction and social change that underlay the changing material record

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S5) Working in groups and teams - Listening skills

(S6) Information skills - Critical reading

British School At Athens (CLAH898)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

·          To develop knowledge and understanding of an aspect of Greek antiquity by studying a postgraduate course at the British School of Athens ·          To undertake training in practical skills relevant to study within the discipline of Classics and Ancient History utilizing expertise, resources and facilities at the British School of Athens ·          To pursue knowledge, training and research within an international advanced research environment

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To possess specialist knowledge and understanding of an aspect of Greek antiquity

(LO2) To identify skills relevant for the field of study in Classics and Ancient History and utilize them to pursue research

(LO3) To utilize resources and take advantage of opportunities to network and receive expert feedback on work while operating in an international advanced research environment

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of data and specialist scholarship to develop logical and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms for different audiences and purposes

(S3) Research: the identification of sources and resources, the collection and manipulation of data, and the presentation of results, with the aid of information and communications technologies; plus practical skills relevant to the analysis of ancient material

(S4) Independence: self-direction and autonomy in the conception, implementation, pursuit and completion of tasks at a professional level

British School At Rome (CLAH899)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:10
Aims

·          To develop knowledge and understanding of an aspect of Roman antiquity by studying a postgraduate course at the British School of Rome ·          To undertake training in practical skills relevant to study within the discipline of Classics and Ancient History utilizing expertise, resources and facilities at the British School of Rome ·          To pursue knowledge, training and research within an international advanced research environment

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To possess specialist knowledge and understanding of an aspect of Roman antiquity

(LO2) To identify skills relevant for the field of study in Classics and Ancient History and utilize them to pursue research

(LO3) To utilize resources and take advantage of opportunities to network and receive expert feedback on work while operating in an international advanced research environment

(S1) Critical thinking: advanced evaluation and reasoning in the analysis and deployment of data and specialist scholarship to develop logical and sophisticated arguments

(S2) Communication: adopting appropriate strategies and language for the presentation of complex ideas in verbal and written forms for different audiences and purposes

(S3) Research: the identification of sources and resources, the collection and manipulation of data, and the presentation of results, with the aid of information and communications technologies; plus practical skills relevant to the analysis of ancient material

(S4) Independence: self-direction and autonomy in the conception, implementation, pursuit and completion of tasks at a professional level