Art, Philosophy and Cultural Institutions MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2022
  • Entry requirements: You need a 2:1 Honours degree, in a relevant field, such as Art, Design, Music, Museum Studies, Philosophy or Humanities subjects. When applying, you'll also need to submit a personal statement detailing why you wish to study this programme.
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Module details

Please note: programme and module details are illustrative and subject to change.

A range of optional modules is available from the Philosophy department, and the School of the Arts, including:

Compulsory modules

Aesthetic Theory and Practice (PHIL755)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module introduces central themes in aesthetic theory, artistic and institutional practice, as considered by current staff actively researching them. This research-led module serves both to introduce students with no previous detailed knowledge of the areas studied to such issues, and to show how active researchers approach them while actively engaging students themselves in research methodology and practices. The module thus functions both as a research-preparation module and a module for consolidating knowledge in these areas of philosophy. Students have the opportunity to consider aspects of the theoretical/historical background of the study of contemporary aesthetics and concentrate on the exploration of key concepts in modern and postmodern aesthetics and cultural practice.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain an appreciation of recent developments in ethics, philosophy of religion and practical philosophy.

(LO2) Students will improve their understanding of philosophical research in the areas of ethics, religion and practical philosophy.

(LO3) Students will improve their ability to research a philosophical topic.

(S1) Research skills.

(S2) Comprehension of abstract ideas and arguments.

(S3) Application of abstract ideas and arguments to ethical, religious and other practical issues.

(S4) Exposition of philosophical theories and arguments.

(S5) Construction and analysis of philosophical theories and arguments.

Cultural Institutions (PHIL759)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To facilitate student participation in discussions on contemporary art with artists, curators, and other museum professionals. To enable students to consider art from the perspective of the institutions in which modern and contemporary art is shown across a range of museological perspectives. To equip students with the conceptual framework to consider the theoretical implications of the practical uses of museum and curatorial space. To introduce students to the theoretical implications of specific exhibition case-studies, both current and forthcoming. To develop student consideration of the role of cultural institutions in wider cultural and social patterns. In these ways to secure the integration of the theoretical and practical aspects of the MA in Art, Aesthetics and Cultural Institutions programme and help prepare students for future research and or a career within a cultural institution.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to explain the theoretical, procedural and practical issues behind exhibitions of art within cultural institutions.

(LO2) Students will be able to explain the wider functions of the cultural institution.

(LO3) Students will be able to explain the place of cultural institutions in broader cultural and social structures.

(S1) Students will enhance their abilities in comprehending theory and its relation to concrete practical and institutional situations.

(S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically about and analysing problems arising from the practice of cultural institutions.

(S3) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S4) Students will develop confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

(S5) Students will enhance their ability to marshal ideas and arguments and present them orally.

Research Skills, Employability and Placement (PHIL758)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To give students practical experience of work in a cultural institution. To improve student knowledge and understanding of how cultural institutions function To enable students to contextualise this experience, knowledge and understanding through sustained reflection.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have acquired practical experience of the work conducted in a cultural institution.

(LO2) Students will have acquired practical experience of the research conducted in a cultural institution.

(LO3) Students will have a firmer idea of issues surrounding employment in cultural institutions.

(LO4) Students will have a firmer idea of issues surrounding research in cultural institutions.

(LO5) Students will be able to reflect critically on the work and research conducted in cultural institutions.

(S1) Ability to participate in the working life of a cultural institution.

(S2) Ability to identify issues involved in the research work of cultural institutions.

(S3) Ability to negotiate issues surrounding employment in cultural institutions.

(S4) Improving own learning and performance. Reflective practice.

(S5) Ability to reflect critically on the role of cultural institutions.

M.a. Dissertation (PHIL706)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim is for the student to choose a topic of special interest in philosophy and conduct research into this area of interest via reading and private study under the supervison of the supervisor to whom they have been allocated.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To produce a systematic piece of written work, organised in chapters/sections in the manner of professional and published work in philosophy, so as to show that the research referred to in the Aims has been mastered in a way appropriate to someone with a grasp of the practice of professional philosophy.

(S1) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

(S2) Digital scholarship participating in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems

(S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

(S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning

(S5) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S6) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, risk management, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources, collecting & using data, applying research methods, applying ethics

(S7) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning

Optional modules

Philosophy of Film (PHIL757)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To consider the variety of ways of thinking philosophically about film. To encourage students to think about film in ways they might not have previously considered. To help students understand the issues and arguments that arise when considering film as an art form. To familiarise students with filmmakers and their methods, and to encourage them to think critically about them. To help students reflect on the differences between film and other art forms, and on the philosophical implications of these differences.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to assess issues that arise in philosophers’ approaches to film.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse some of the problems associated with the philosophy of film.

(LO3) Students will be able to explain philosophical difficulties involved in considering the relation of film to other art forms.

(LO4) Students will be able to assess philosophical issues raised by the methods of different filmmakers.

(LO5) Students will be able to evaluate arguments for and against film as art.

(LO6) Students will be able to reflect critically on various topics, such as adaptation, and the implications they might have for film as an art form.

(LO7) Students will be able to engage with philosophers and critics who hold controversial views on the importance of film.

(LO8) Students will be able to engage critically with the films presented on the module.

(S1) Students will further develop their skills in thinking critically, analysing problems and analysing and assessing arguments.

(S2) Students will enhance their ability to identify and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S3) Students will develop further confidence in considering previously unfamiliar ideas and approaches.

(S4) Students will enhance their ability to analyse works of film art.

(S5) Students will develop their confidence in group discussion of philosophical topics.

(S6) Students will improve their writing skills, presenting difficult topics in an engaging and lucid manner.

Aesthetics (PHIL716)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will explore in detail arguments of some of the most important philosophers on art, aesthetics and cultural theory, including Kant, Hegel, Danto and Tolstoy. Students will critically engage with key concepts and theories in aesthetics, including the aesthetic judgement, disinterestedness, the institutional theory of art, the nature of representation and expression and feminism and post-modern critiques. Students will be encouraged to develop connections between works of art and artistic practices of the past and present.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to explain and evaluate some of the main theories in aesthetics.

(LO2) Students will be able to analyse and critically assess key concepts and arguments relating to aesthetics and art.

(LO3) Students will be able to structure discussion of issues in aesthetics at an advanced level.

(LO4) Students will be able to identify and develop links between influential philosophical theories and artistic practices.

(LO5) Students will be able to articulate, defend and criticise positions in aesthetics and philosophy of art.

(LO6) Students will be able to present their ideas with clarity and confidence.

(LO7) Students will be able to develop in writing, coherent, structures and sophisticated accounts on abstract philosophical issues.

(S1) Develop skills in making appropriate use of information technology, information on the WWW and reference works and databases relevant to the discipline.

(S2) Enhance the capacity to participate in debates about controversial and profound issues.

(S3) Develop willingness to critically evaluate and reflect upon arguments, beliefs, proposals and values.

(S4) Enhance the ability in reading and understanding complex texts and abstract material.

(S5) Develop skills in thinking critically, analyse problems in detail and providing in depth evaluation of arguments.

(S6) Enhance ability to identify, develop and reflect critically upon the issues that underlie debates.

(S7) Develop confidence in considering ideas and approaches with which they may be less familiar.

(S8) Enhance ability to marshal arguments and present them orally and in writing.

(S9) Advance ability to perform bibliographical searches, to include citations and bibliographies in their work, organise and produce presentations of work to professional standard.

(S10) Enhance oral and written communication skills and develop skills in explaining complex material in a precise manner.

Media, Culture and Everyday Life (COMM733)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To examine key theories and debates relating to the impact of impact of cultures of communication and media on everyday life in the digital age.

To develop a critical understanding of the relationship between media, modernity and everyday experience.

To develop a reflexive understanding of the role of digital technologies and media in contemporary social and cultural life.

To explore the role of digital media cultures and spaces in relation to issues of globalisation, consumption, and transnational/translocal mobility.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of key theories and debates relating to the impact of cultures of communication and media on everyday life.

(LO2) Students will be able to critically analyse theoretical approaches to media, modernity and everyday experience.

(LO3) Students will gain a reflexive understanding of the role of digital technologies and media in contemporary social and cultural life.

(LO4) Students will be able to display practical understanding of digital media cultures in relation to key themes explored in the module.

(S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, communicating in a foreign language, influencing, presentations.

(S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information.

(S4) Literacy application of literacy, ability to produce clear, structured written work and oral literacy - including listening and questioning.

(S5) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others.

Digital Media and Society B (COMM734)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module has five main goals:

* To provide students with an appreciation of the breadth and depth of interaction between digital media and society at large.

* To provide students with an appreciation of the scientific, technical and organisational underpinnings of contemporary digital media .

* To engage students in exploring the social and cultural policy implications of digital media.

*To explore the benefits provided and risks posed by each new form of digital media .

* To explore the deeply linked connections between digital media and society, social change and individual experience.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of academic theory and debates relating to the relationship between digital media and society.


(LO2) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of the technical, organisational and policy aspects of digital media use.

(LO3) Students will be able to critically analyse the academic and policy research approaches to digital media use.

(LO4) Students will be able to critically analyse and evaluate the social impacts of digital media use through a focus on selected contemporary issues.

(LO5)

(S1) Digital scholarship participating in emerging academic, professional and research practices that depend on digital systems.

(S2) Problem solving critical thinking and creativity in analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate conclusion or solutions.

(S3) Media literacy online critically reading and creatively producing academic and professional communications in a range of media.

(S4) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, influencing, presentations.

The Modern (ENGL770)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

- Students will demonstrate an advanced understanding of the concepts of ‘the modern’ and modernity, particularly as they relate to a range of early twentieth-century literary texts.

- Students will demonstrate advanced skills in analysing those texts in relation to relevant intellectual and material contexts.

- Students will demonstrate awareness of modernism as examples of individual art works and as a global network of related individuals, venues and works.

- Students will demonstrate skills in creative, cross-media approaches to coursework, including a digital assignment addressing the key ideas of the module.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will acquire an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will acquire a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S7) Students will acquire advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

The Contemporary (ENGL772)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aims of this module are as follows:
- To enable students to engage with a cross-section of literature, theory and criticism to understand the concept of ‘the contemporary’ as a scholarly discipline.
- To enable students to understand and engage with the historical and conceptual connections between ‘the contemporary’ and other periodisations such as ‘the modern’.
- To develop skills in the comparison of literary and critical/theoretical writing, and in the understanding of how to apply theoretical contexts to contemporary literary contexts.
- To develop skills in creative, cross-media approaches to coursework including the opportunity to create a podcast addressing the key ideas of the module.
- To provide students with the materials to develop a critical understanding of how ‘the contemporary’ might vary across diverse authors and writing practices.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will gain the ability to read, analyse, interpret and compare with competence and independence a wide variety of literary texts.

(LO2) Students will acquire an advanced knowledge and systematic understanding of the political and ideological aspects of literary texts and how they can be situated within appropriate cultural and social contexts.

(LO3) Students will gain a critical appreciation of the ways in which texts can be situated within literary history, including issues of genre, influence, and creation and reception.

(LO4) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and critical awareness of current and new literary, critical and theoretical debates.

(LO5) Students will gain new skills fostering continued independent learning and a critical appreciation of complex issues within the broader context of the Arts and Humanities.

(S1) Students will acquire a systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current debates and new insights within the field of literature and its contexts.

(S2) Students will gain advanced critical and analytical skills in relation to diverse forms of discourse.

(S3) Students will gain advanced literacy, interpersonal and communications skills, and the ability to present sustained and persuasive written and oral arguments to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

(S4) Students will gain the ability to comprehensively understand and apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature.

(S5) Students will gain the ability to handle complex information and argument in a critical, creative and self-reflective manner.

(S6) Students will gain the ability to use IT and other relevant tools and resources to present written and oral work to a professional, scholarly standard.

(S7) Students will acquire advanced skills and experience in selecting and using electronic and/or archival resources for planning and undertaking research and writing.

(S8) Students will gain organisational skills in managing time and workloads, and in meeting deadlines.

Metaphysical and Epistemic Issues in Philosophy of Religion (PHIL715)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To give the student a detailed grasp of the current state of discussion in the major arguments for the existence of God, and in problems concerning the concept of God, predominantly in the Western tradition.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will demonstrate an advanced awareness of various issues and controversies in the philosophy of religion.

(LO2) Students will show the capacity to systematically analyze contemporary debates in the philosophy of religion.

(LO3) Students will demonstrate the ability to advance arguments with appropriate rigour and to come to reasoned conclusions.

(LO4) Students will show an ability to appreciate and evaluate different points of view on matters relevant to the philosophy of religion.

(S1) Students will enhance their abilities in the reading and analysis of complex texts

(S2) Students will develop their skills in thinking critically and analysing arguments with clarity, precision and rigour

(S3) Students will enhance their capacities to respond creatively and critically to intellectual challenges.

(S4) Students will develop their competence in undertaking independent research and information retrieval

(S5) Students will develop their capacities to marshall and structure arguments in academic form

(S6) Students will develop their willingness critically to evaluate to arguments, beliefs, proposals and values, both their own and of others

(S7) Students will enhance their capacity to participate, respectfully and reflectively, in debates about controversial and profound matters

(S8) Students will develop their skills in time management

(S9) Students will develop the fluency and maturity of their academic writing skills

(S10) Students will enhance their skills in oral debate about complex and controversial matters

Architectural and Urban Forms of the Islamic World (ARCH737)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:

1. Provide students with an understanding of the role of urban and building rehabilitation within historic fabrics.
2. Provide students with knowledge about the transitions from the past to the future by exploring reconstruction, renovation and adaptive reuse practices.
3. Provide students with skills to be able to analyse and compare Islamic high and vernacular architecture and urban form to gain a deeper insight into the breadth of Islamic cultural traditions worldwide.
4. Provide students with methods and tools for establishing critical understanding of the architectural and urban elements of the Islamic city in different contexts, including ‘high’ and ‘peripheral’ traditional settlements.
5. Introduce students to the complex challenges of heritage management of Islamic cities including key architectural structures, such as mosques, madrasas, and fortification elements.
6. Provide students with skills to be able to investigate the complexity involved in community participation and the use of traditional material in reconstruction and renovation in different geographical contexts.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Develop a critical understanding of the evolution of the Islamic world, through historical chronological outlines highlighting locational characteristics and organisational features.

(LO2) Investigate and compare the principal architectural and urban elements of the Islamic city in different contexts, including ‘high’ and ‘peripheral’ traditional settlements.

(LO3) Explore methods of interventions on existing buildings and urban spaces for the enhancement of their historic significance and contemporary use.

(LO4) Critically investigate the relevance of architectural qualities and urban characteristics of Islamic built environments in general (medina form for example), and in particular (mosques, madrasas, ornaments) to contemporary design.

(LO5) Apply a variety of techniques and methods related to investigating contemporary debates surrounding the issues of conservation and restoration in the Islamic world.

(LO6) Confirm a critical understanding of definitions, rationale and relevance, methodological approach, design operations and tools for adaptive reuse and/or development proposals.

(LO7) Critically understand the importance of building a resilient community through collaborative rehabilitation efforts, besides investigating participatory design methods and strategies applied to restoration and adaptive reuse initiatives.

(S1) Data collection, research and analysis skills.

(S2) Demonstrate international perspectives by being able to locate, discuss, analyse, and evaluate information from international sources.

(S3) Understanding ethical and social responsibility issues in particular settings; value diversity and similarities of architectural languages and cultures.

(S4) Problem solving/ questioning and critical thinking.

(S5) Written literacy/ ability to produce clear, well-structured and well-written work, besides producing heritage drawings.

(S6) Communication and presentation skills / oral literacy.

(S7) Time management.

Heritage Documentation, Digitization and Presentation (ARCH739)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to:
1. Assist students to develop an understanding of the methods, techniques, applications and tools used in the documentation of different types of heritage: from tangible heritage assets such as settlements and buildings, archaeological sites and artefacts, to intangible heritage assets such as cultural landscapes, traditional knowledge, arts and crafts, oral history and significant historical events.
2. Provide students with the ability to identify the most appropriate strategy, approach and method to document heritage, based on a holistic consideration of the parameters involved such as nature and age of the asset, time and resources availability, asset values, target audiences, and end-users.
3. Develop, through hands-on activities, the students’ technical knowledge and basic skills in field documentation of built heritage through sketching, 3D laser scanning and photogrammetry, terrestrial and aerial photography.
4. Develop, through hands-on activities, the students’ technical knowledge and basic skills in digital representation and visualization of built heritage through 2D drawing, traditional 3D modelling, 3D spatial data generation, rendering.
5. Develop the students’ technical knowledge of the workflows, standards and applications for digital acquisition and archiving of vulnerable heritage assets such as photographic slides and prints, film and glass plate negatives, maps and drawings, field sketches and notes.
6. Develop, through hands-on activities, the students’ basic skills in digitization, metadata development at multiple levels (collection/ work / image) and data entry for vulnerable heritage assets.
7. Develop the students’ basic knowledge about virtual heritage technologies and applications such as Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR).

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understand, identify and apply the most appropriate methods, techniques and tools in the context of the documentation and presentation of tangible and intangible heritage properties and assets.

(LO2) Understand and apply workflows and standards in the context of heritage digital archiving.

(LO3) Understand technologies and applications for virtual recreation and immersive experience of heritage assets and settings.

(LO4) Develop a model template for field documentation, surveying, reporting, presenting the outputs produced as part of the hands-on activities and critically reflecting on methods, techniques and equipment used, data collected and preliminary observation findings, and challenges encountered.

(LO5) Develop a model template for digital heritage records presentation, including the images digitised as part of the hands-on activities illustrated by metadata on collections, subjects and images.

(LO6) Assess the most suitable building conservation techniques and ways to prevent future material decay by utilising digital tools and following appropriate conservation practice.

(S1) Heritage drawing skills.

(S2) Digitization and IT skills.

(S3) Communication and presentation skills.

(S4) Written literacy/ ability to produce clear, well-structured and well-written work.

(S5) Problem solving/ questioning and critical thinking/ inquisitive thinking in analysing situations and facts towards making appropriate choices and developing effective solutions.

(S6) Teamwork.

(S7) Time management.


180 credits to be taken in total