International Relations and Security MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2022
  • Entry requirements: You will need a good 2:1 Bachelor's degree in Politics studies or a related area e.g. other social science degrees. On occasion, we will also consider a good 2:1 Bachelor's degree from a non social science area.
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Module details

The programme, based on the strength of the department, will furnish its participants with and advanced understanding of the key issues in international relations and security. There are four core modules, as follows:

International Relations Theories module

Through this module you will begin to understand the main theories in the international relations literature and apply these theories to explain peace and war in the international system.

International System module

The international system module provides you with a comprehensive introduction to today’s international system and security challenges. In particular, the module will explore to what extent the International Relations theories can help us to understand today’s developments. The module draws on the unique expertise in the Department of Politics at Liverpool: violent non-state actors. We are experts on terrorism, international criminal actors, human trafficking, insurgents and private military and security companies.

Research Methods in Politics module

The research methods module will familiarise you with some of the most commonly used qualitative and quantitative methods for political research. These include case study design and a basic introduction to descriptive statistics.

Dissertation module

In this module students will put all their research skill to work and develop a 12,000 – 15,000 word dissertation. One of the major advantages of the module is the freedom of choice: the student is free in choosing the research subject, and the opportunity to conduct independent research.

The core modules are complemented by optional modules. Students are free to choose three modules at their own discretion. Still, the programme design provides pathways suggestions (which are not mandatory) in order to assure coherency of studies. Each pathway is designed to complement the core modules, yet offers a unique additional specialization and qualification.

Pathway I: International Relations and Security

The pathway would deepen you understanding on matters international relations and security discussed in the core modules.

  • POLI130 The International Politics of the Mediterranean and the Middle East
  • POLI150 Contemporary Anti-Slavery, Forced Labour and Human Rights
  • POLI 353 The Puzzle of Civil War
  • POLI 347 Strategies Studies in Conflict and Terrorism
  • POLI 328 EU as an International Actor
  • POLI 321 International Intervention
  • POLI 510 Quantitative Methods and World Politics
  • LAW 353 Principles of International Law

Pathway II: Conflict Resolution

The conflict resolution pathway complements the discussions on conflict, violence and security in the core modules as it provides a deeper insight into conflict analysis and peaceful conflict solutions tools.

  • POLI133 Comparative Peace Processes 
  • POLI 307 Comparative and International Judicial Politics
  • POLI510 Quantitative Methods and World Politics
  • POLI815 Conflict and Politics in Northern Ireland

Pathway III: Political Communication

The political communications pathway provides an additional perspective on international politics by adding the role of media to the picture.

  • COMM765 Media and Politics: Theory
  • COMM748 Global Journalism and Politics
  • COMM763 Media and Politics: Economy and Society

Please note, all modules are subject to availability and it may be necessary to remove modules due to changes in staffing and research leave. Where modules are removed following registration, students will be notified as far in advance as possible.

Compulsory modules

International Relations Theories (POLI132)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To understand the main theories in the international relations literature;

Ability to apply these theories to their specific fields of research interest.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Possess a comprehensive understanding of the strengths and weaknessess of the key theories of international relations

(LO2) Ability to apply International Relation theories to key issues in international relations.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:Locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources.

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

Research Methods in Politics (POLI116)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module will familiarise students with some of the most commonly used quatitative and qualitative methods for political research. These include case study design and a basic introduction to descriptive statistics. In addition, students will be familiarised with the theoretical debates relating to their choice of research methodology with particular reference to the quantitative-qualitative dichotomy and comparative methods.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To introduce students to the theoretical debate surrounding the major methods for research work in the field of politics.

(LO2) To familiarise students with the practical dilemmas and tensions connected to research in the field of politics.

(LO3) To teach students to choose appropriate methodological approaches for a particular research project and to work out a suitable research plan.

(LO4) To teach students a number of transferable skills, namely IT skills, analytical skills, especially with regard to quantitative data, communication and interactive skills, time management and organisational skills.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

The International System (POLI131)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To equip students with the necessary empirical knowledge and analytical tools to study international relations at an advanced level;

To explore relationship between theory, history and contemporary developments in the international sphere.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) By the end of the module, students will: Possess a comprehensive base of empirical knowledge with respect to the politics of the international system

(LO2) Have developed an understanding of the key debates in the field of international relations.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

Masters Dissertation (POLI119)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The dissertation gives students the opportunity to produce a lengthy piece of work (12-15,000 words, including footnotes and references) on a topic of their choice. The aim is to enhance the student's analytical and critical skills that have been developed in the rest of their Master's degree, and apply these to a research project. The dissertation need not be reliant upon new primary data, but it must demonstrate an element of originality, either in terms of its analytical approach, methods or application of theory to case studies. It is essential that the work is rigorous and coherent, and is located within the wider context of contemporary scholarship in political studies and international relations; The dissertation is an independent piece of work, but must be supervised by a member of the academic staff in the department of Politics. The supervisor is responsible for giving advice on reading, structure and presentation of dissertations. Students are expected to see their supervisor at least four times during the dissertation preparation and writing stages. Some of these sessions may occur within other taught modules.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To enable students to engage with a wide range of literature, research methodologies and methods to carry out a study on a topic of their choice.

(LO2) To produce a significant and robust piece of analysis in the area of international relations and/or political studies

(LO3) To enable students to understand the research process and develop their ability to manage this process in their time effectively.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing including referencing skills.

Optional modules

Big Data and Society: Foundations, Politics, and Policy B (COMM752)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to introduce students to the study of online media and platforms, with a particular focus on ‘big’ social trace data. As well as developing their understanding of how Internet-based media systems work, students will learn about the strengths and weaknesses of using big data for social science research, and engage with key online political communication policy questions.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will analyse interactions between the media, platforms, and citizens.

(LO2) Students will develop their understanding of how digital data is generated, collected and used in the modern world.

(LO3) Students will engage with key current debates around media, data and society.

(S1) Students will develop their skills in building and presenting an argument, while selecting appropriate sources.

(S2) Students will be able to link key public policy questions to social science research approaches that could help practically address them.

(S3) Students will develop skills in critically engaging with evidence.

(S4) Students will further develop their academic writing skills.

Media and Politics: Theories and Cases B (COMM765)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to give students an appreciation of how questions of the media are placed within political studies and how questions of politics are placed within media and communication studies. It also aims to develop skills both of political and media analysis and to encourage students to understand the media-political relationship within a context of change in political culture and in media and information technology. The module will also equip students with the skill to assess and examine the power dynamics, contested representations, and consequences of media reporting of selected contemporary political conflicts. A further aim is for students to become able to scrutinise the underlying rationale for media representation and reporting of politics.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of key theories and debates relating to the relationship between media and politics.

(LO2) Students will be able to critically analyse the theoretical approaches to media/politics relationship.

(LO3) Students will be able to evaluate media power through a focus on selected contemporary cases and controversies.

(LO4) Students will acquire an advanced understanding of different models of the relationship between media, society and the state.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

(S3) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

Principles of International Law (LAW353)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module provides students with an in-depth specialist knowledge of the principles and structure of international law, with special emphasis on law-making processes;

Critical tools for an understanding of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations;

Ability to identify the law and apply it correctly to hypothetical scenarios informed by major doctrinal and policy concerns;

Ability to undertake independent research and reflect on today’s most debated theoretical and practical issue in the field;

Ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing;

Ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials against the backdrop of multiple international, regional and domestic legal and policy frameworks.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A critical understanding and knowledge of the principles that form the basis of the law governing inter-state relations

(LO2) An ability to identify complex international legal issues and problems including those suitable for further research

(LO3) An ability to work effectively with all relevant primary and secondary international legal sources, including complex materials, and to inform and develop understanding of a given topic

(LO4) An awareness of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations

(LO5) An ability to apply legal knowledge to complex situations including those involving doctrinal disputes over the theory and practice of international law, and to offer own reasoned views over such legal disputes

(LO6) An ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing

(LO7) An ability to undertake independent research, and to think critically about international legal issues

(LO8) An ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials within the wider context of international relations and domestic practices

(S1) Conduct independent research and critical analysis

(S2) Problem Solving

(S3) Verbal communication and reasoning

(S4) Effective legal reasoning

The International Politics of the Middle East (POLI130)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide in-depth analysis of the international politics of the Middle East, focusing primarily on identity and security issues;

The role of external forces in shaping the development of region’s politics;

Challenging the prevailing arguments about the Middle East, its culture and compatibility with democracy;

Integrating political science and theories of international relations in Middle Eastern Studies.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Awareness of the ways in which security issues at local, national, regional and international levels interrelate with each other.

(LO2) Ability to assess the contending interpretations of reasons for conflict and instability in the Middle East region.

(LO3) A critical understanding of the prospects for regional cooperation and the building of security communities.

(LO4) Ability to compare attempts to change regimes through mass action and reform from above

(S1) Research skills - All Information skills

(S2) Information skills - Evaluation

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S4) Communication (oral and written) - Influencing skills - argumentation

(S5) Communication (oral and written) - Communicating for audience

Contemporary Anti-slavery, Forced Labour and Human Rights (POLI150)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students’ familiarity with contemporary examples of human exploitation analogous with slavery;

To develop students’ analysis of current practice and assist them in drawing reasoned conclusions for future action ;

To contribute to the process of developing anti-slavery and anti-trafficking strategies, amongst governments and NGOs, and raising awareness of issues related to their development .

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Analyse theoretical approaches to contemporary forms of ‘slavery’ and human exploitation.

(LO2) Evaluate the role of scholarly concepts, rhetorical analogies, legal definitions and national or international legislation in identifying and eliminating forms of modern ‘slavery’.

(LO3) Formulate conclusions regarding the role of current practice and the potential for future development in a specific area of voluntary, legislative or enforcement efforts to end contemporary ‘slaveries’.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

From the Ira to Isis: Understanding Political VIolence in the Contemporary World (POLI324)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims

To help students think critically about the world we live in today, specifically focusing on terrorism;

To consider why and how terrorist groups come into existence and disappear;

To examine the historical evolution of terrorism, the importance of terrorism in the contemporary world, different types of terrorism, and the responses to such threats;

To think about why a universal definition of terrorism has proven so elusive and what this means for the study of terrorism;

To explore the controversies that have been generated by terrorism and counter-terrorism.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The ability to think critically about the world in which we live today, especially regarding the legitimacy of political violence.

(LO2) An understanding of the key debates and controversies in the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

(LO3) The ability to engage in critical discussion about questions relating to terrorism and counter-terrorism.

(LO4) The ability to engage and interact with the main themes in a specific body of intellectual knowledge.

(LO5) An ability to access and make effective use of bibliographical and electronic sources of information.

(LO6) Make arguments in a coherent and effective manner.

(LO7) The ability to write a cogent, well-argued research paper that deals with a significant aspect of these debates.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual).

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

(S3) Working in groups and teams - group action planning.

Strategic Studies in Conflicts and Terrorism (POLI347)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
Aims

Examine which factors are more likely to trigger the outbreak of wars within a country and the evidence in favour and against the advanced theoretical arguments;

Analyse the strength and shortcomings of the advanced theories by looking at recent empirical contributions in the field;

Understand how and to which extent wars, terrorism and conflicts can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

Investigate the effect of peacekeeping operations on peace conditions and peace duration by a review of cases of success and failure of peacekeeping activities;

Examine the likely effects of terrorism on governments’ responses and the domestic and international factors leading to “suboptimal” counterterrorist policies;

Analyse the relationship between terrorism and public opinion and investigate the mechanisms advanced by selected theories on public responses and the empirical strategies used to test them.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understand the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and terrorism and how empirical research can address some of these puzzles while others are remain still open.

(LO2) Interpret the findings advanced by the empirical literature against or in line with the theoretical predictions advanced by the literature and students’ own pre-theoretical intuitions on the determinants of wars and conflicts.

(LO3) Become familiar with some of the empirical techniques used in conflict and terrorism studies.

(LO4) Reach a critical evaluation of the likely domestic and international triggers of wars, conflicts and terrorism and extrapolate recommendations for policy making.

(S1) Acquire solid knowledge of the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and the main obstacles to conflict resolution.

(S2) Interpret the empirical findings advanced by the literature and familiarity with the main methodological tools used to estimate the determinants and effects of conflicts and terrorism.

(S3) Carry out descriptive data analysis and basic statistical exercises using statistical software packages (Stata).

(S4) Grasp the importance of research design in social science research and assess the validity of the arguments, hypotheses and findings in conflict and terrorism studies.

Gender and Global Politics (POLI349)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To illustrate what feminist approaches contribute to our understanding of world politics;

To understand the implications of identity and difference in the practice of global politics;

To encourage the application of theoretical gender debates to practical political issues;

To critically engage with feminist approaches to policy making.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) The ability to deploy gender as a category of analysis in relation to issues in global politics.

(LO2) Knowledge of literature applying feminist theory and concepts to the study of global politics.

(LO3) Ability to understand and critically analyse gendered issues and policy responses within global politics.

(LO4) Ability to synthesise and present key issues on a particular topic.

(S1) Critical thinking and reasoning

(S2) Presentation skills

(S3) Policy analysis

(S4) Enhanced research skills

The Puzzle of Civil War (POLI353)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Understand major theories and empirical findings related to civil conflict research;

Demonstrate knowledge of the logic of qualitative and quantitative approaches and critically assess advantages and disadvantages of different methods of inquiry;

Understand the scope and limits of the scientific study of civil wars;

Complete a theoretically informed and method based essay that investigates a civil war.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Knowledge of main theories and most important literature on civil war.

(LO2) Ability to assess the different explanations of civil conflict onset, duration and outcome.

(LO3) Ability to apply the case study method, conceptualization, and case selection.

(LO4) Ability to explain civil conflict dynamics, e.g. onset, duration and outcome.

(S1) Interpreting quantitative data and qualitative evidence.

(S2) Articulate (oral and written) major theories and empirical findings related to civil war.

(S3) Developing and independently conducting a (small) research project on civil war.

(S4) Critical assessment of scholarly literature.

Conflict and Politics in Northern Ireland (POLI815)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide students with a well-informed and up-to-date understanding of the politics and governance of Northern Ireland;

To engage students with scholarly debates about the conflict and its aftermath in Northern Ireland;

To enable students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understanding of the causes of the Northern Ireland conflict.

(LO2) Ability to evaluate different interpretations of the Northern Ireland conflict.

(LO3) Knowledge of the theory and practice of consociational power-sharing.

(LO4) Ability to assess the extent and implications of division in contemporary Northern Ireland politics and society.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - seminar discussions.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing including referencing skills.

(S3) Time and project management - personal organisation.

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

(S5) Working in groups and teams - listening skills.

(S6) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources.

(S7) Global citizenship - relevant economic / political understanding.

British Foreign Policy (POLI511)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To equip students with an advanced understanding of British Foreign Policy;

To understand Britain’s current place in the world and its historical contexts;

To gain an advanced understanding of Britain’s relationships with the world in the 20th and into the 21st Century;

To gain an advanced understanding of the key literature relating to British Foreign Policy and the UKs role in the world;

To evaluate Britain’s relationships with the UN, G7, and NATO;

To evaluate Britain’s relationship with the European Union as the ‘awkward partner’ and Brexit.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the literature on British foreign policy

(LO2) Students will explore a complex area of British foreign policy and the UK’s relations with at least one other country

(LO3) Students will discuss how British foreign policy developed over the post-war period

(LO4) Students will understand the functions of the Foreign Office and how it engages with other countries

(LO5) Students will present a judgement of the intellectual and political significance of the literature discussed in the workshops/seminars

(S1) Students will communicate complex ideas related to foreign policy in an understandable and clear manner

(S2) Students will research advanced issues pertaining to Britain and the world in the 20th and 21st Century and express their evidence-based arguments in an academic style.

(S3) Students will make use of digital archives for their research.

(S4) Students will refine their debating skills in seminars and then convey their understanding in assessed work

(S5) Students will identify and interpret evidence in the development of a critical argument

Global Journalism and Politics (COMM748)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to ways that different social, political, and economic contexts impact on how journalism is produced and consumed.

To enable students to compare the professional practices and ideologies of journalists across different countries.

To analyse the efficacy and quality of journalism in comparative perspective.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to define and critically evaluate key theories and concepts that explain the interplay between journalism and politics.

(LO2) Students will be able to understand and critically analyse the role journalists play both in the global South and in the global North.

(LO3) Students will be able to discuss the current state of media freedom and journalistic practices around the world as well as the main contextual factors that influence those practices.

(LO4) Students will be able to critically analyse different perspectives on how global audiences' expectations and consumption habits shape, and are shaped by, the political information environment.

(S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, presentations.

(S3) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources.

(S4) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information.

Media and Politics: Economy and Society B (COMM763)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to encourage students to develop a critical understanding of the economic underpinnings of media and, in particular, news production, and how these relate to and impact upon media texts, discourses, and public politics more generally. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical attitude towards media ownership, and processes/conventions of media production in capitalist societies. Further, they will be given opportunities to analyse the ways in which these influences manifest themselves in media texts and, by extension, in political culture and public opinion. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical and analytical understanding of various media discourses affected by neoliberal thought, populist rhetoric, and political partisanship. Students will develop a basic understanding of media effects research, in particular as regards the use of experimental designs and regression analyses.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of economic theories of news production and the relationship of media and communication with a neoliberal, capitalist system.

(LO2) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of economic media production contexts and their bearing on offline and online media discourses and, by extension, political culture and public opinion.

(LO3) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of current trends and developments in media technology, business logics, and media use, and their implications for democratic politics.

(LO4) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of approaches to studying citizens’ media use and its effects on political knowledge, attitudes, and participation.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills).

(S5) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

(S6) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding.

Comparative Peace Processes (POLI133)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims

To develop understanding of what constitutes a peace process;

To understand the development of peace processes in selected locations;

To understand why peace processes succeed or fail.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understanding of the concept of a peace processes

(LO2) Knowledge of the conceptual and empirical development of peace processes in certain locations.

(LO3) Understanding of why peace processes succeed or fail.

(S1) Ability to understand and evaluate competing academic perspectives.

(S2) Ability to produce coherent and comprehensive written material via exam and essay.

(S3) Ability to articulate ideas orally in seminars.

Crisis and Change in Human Geography (ENVS434)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to stimulate students to think critically about the dynamic relationships between power, space and cultural change in relation to specific pertinent themes linked to crisis and change. In doing so the module seeks to provide students an understanding of core geographic theory – and the module also allows students to develop knowledge of both Global North and Global South contexts for relevant debates. Following a module introduction and contextual session, the module is delivered through a series of seminars where experts lead discussions on specified topics, embodying a dialogical and interactive mode of learning. Each topic is the empirical or conceptual conduit through which the dynamics of space, power and culture can be examined.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To gain knowledge of a wide range of social and geographical theories relating to power, space and culture

(LO2) To understand the role of power in relation to cultural forms at a range of scales

(LO3) To be to be independent in the process of learning by choosing the essay topics and working closely with academics

(LO4) To draw on evidence to support students’ arguments

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) International awareness

(S3) Communication skills

Quantitative Methods and World Politics (POLI510)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to core statistical concepts and considerations in quantitative social science;

To enable students to generate descriptive statistics from a dataset;

To familiarise students with current quantitative research in areas such as public opinion, comparative government, international relations and security studies;

To enable students to read and understand statistical analysis in journal articles and reports;

To give students experience using contemporary software for statistical analysis;

To enable students to conduct their own multiple regression analysis, testing one or more hypotheses about world politics.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Knowledge of core statistical concepts and considerations in quantitative social science.

(LO2) Knowledge of the functionality of contemporary statistical software and of the basics of statistical programming.

(LO3) Knowledge of current data projects in the study of world politics, as well the ability to find quantitative data about political issues.

(LO4) Knowledge of how the analysis of data contributes to debates in the study of politics and international relations and the ability to research these debates.

(LO5) Knowledge of the current quantitative evidence about key issues in world politics and the ability to evaluate this evidence.

(S1) Interpreting quantitative data.

(S2) Communicating the findings of quantitative research.

(S3) Using statistical software.

(S4) Researching a topic in the quantitative study of world politics.

(S5) Conducting independent statistical analysis of data and testing hypotheses.

Africa-china Relations in A Changing Global Order (POLI305)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Understand key historical and contemporary policy debates and issues regarding the evolution of Africa’s relations with China;

Evaluate competing traditional and critical IR theories and frameworks to analyse issues pertaining to China-Africa relations and the combined effect of China’s rise and African agency on development and security;

Identify and evaluate various forms of and factors influencing development of China-Africa relations;

Critically analyse the evolving role of China-Africa relations in global governance;

Deploy theoretical arguments and apply them to empirical case studies.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Evaluate the nature and forms of Africa-China relations in the context of South-South Cooperation.

(LO2) Apply their understanding of historical and contemporary policy debates and issues to the creation of policy-oriented outputs.

(LO3) Classify and apply traditional and critical IR theories to analyse issues pertaining to China-Africa relations and the combined effect of China’s rise and African agency on development and security.

(LO4) Reflect on the impact of China-Africa relations on global and contemporary issues such as development, peacekeeping, multilateralism and security.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem evaluating skills.

(S2) Communication and debate skills.

(S3) Produce and disseminate policy-oriented outputs.

(S4) Interpret evidence to advance a critical argument.

International Intervention (POLI321)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will gain a foundational understanding of the law, theory, and practice of international intervention, international peace and security;

Students will develop the ability to analyse critically the gap between the laws and the practice of international interventions;

Students will explore the way how intervention practices have changed over time and how norms surrounding interventions have shifted;

Students will debate problems and challenges that face states intervening in third-states including issues of sovereignty, and the UN Charter articles on non-intervention and non-use of force.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the law, politics, and practice of international intervention.

(LO2) Relate the role and framework of international institutions such as the UN to the practice and laws surrounding international intervention.

(LO3) Identify problems and challenges that face the international community of states regarding the practice of (unregulated) intervention in third-states.

(LO4) Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge from interventions that alter the practice and understanding of state sovereignty.

(S1) Enhanced research skills.

(S2) Enhanced skills of communication, negotiation and debating.

(S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

Identity in Contemporary International Politics (POLI332)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To analyse the political significance of identity in international politics;

To examine the interrelationship between national identity, territory, sovereignty and democracy in terms of ideological foundations and in the context of international relations;

To draw implications for the construction of stable political communities in conditions of cultural diversity.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) By the end of the course students will be familiar with the concepts of identity - national, political and ethnic.

(LO2) Students will gain the understanding of the main debates within the citizenship studies and minority rights.

(LO3) Students will be confident with transnational politics, diasporas and how they are reflected in international politics.

(LO4) Students will be able to accompany theoretical concepts and discussions by examples and appropriate case studies.

(LO5) Students will be familiar with the emergence of the nation-state and ethnic exclusion

(LO6) Students will be able to analyse issues and controversies surrounding this most interdisciplinary and contested area of political science - identity and its effects on international politics.

(S1) Team (group) working respecting others, co-operating, negotiating / persuading, awareness of interdependence with others

(S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S3) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information

(S4) Self-management readiness to accept responsibility (i.e. leadership), flexibility, resilience, self-starting, initiative, integrity, willingness to take risks, appropriate assertiveness, time management, readiness to improve own performance based on feedback/reflective learning


The programme detail and modules listed are illustrative and could be subject to change.