Contemporary Europe MA

  • Programme duration: Full-time: 12 months   Part-time: 24 months
  • Programme start: September 2022
  • Entry requirements: You will need a good 2:1 Bachelor's degree in Politics studies or a related area e.g. other social science degrees. On occasion, we will also consider a good 2:1 Bachelor's degree from a non social science area.

Module details

Due to the impact of COVID-19 we're changing how the course is delivered

Students on the Contemporary Europe MA will take 30 credits of mandatory and 30 credits of optional modules in Semester 1, and 15 credits of mandatory and 45 credits of optional modules in Semester 2.

The required dissertation (POLI504) is taken over the summer period. 

*Information provided above is indicative and changes may be made according to programme development and teaching availability.

Compulsory modules

European Nation-state and Politics of Nationalism (POLI502)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide in-depth analysis of history of the nation-state and nationalism in Europe;

Integrating theories of nationalism and political developments in Europe from 19th century to the present;

A critical understanding of conflicts on the European continent;

Ability to assess the impact of European integration on the meaning of national identities and citizenship;

To communicate arguments and knowledge in oral and written form.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Awareness of history of the nation-state and nationalism in Europe.

(LO2) A critical understanding of theories of nationalism and political developments in Europe from 19th century to the present.

(LO3) A critical understanding of conflicts on the European continent.

(LO4) Ability to assess the impact of European integration on the meaning of national identities and citizenship.

(LO5) To communicate arguments and knowledge in oral and written form.

(S1) Research skills: all information skills.

(S2) Information skills: evaluation.

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving: evaluation.

(S4) Communication (written): influencing skills - argumentation.

(S5) Communication (oral).

Research Methods in Social Sciences (POLI503)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to the debates about epistemology, methodology and methods in social sciences;

To familiarise students with the practical issues and dilemmas connected to research generally and particularly with most commonly used methods;

To teach students how to choose appropriate methods for particular research projects and to work out suitable research plans;

To teach students analytical skills, IT skills, communication and interactive skills, time management and organizational skills;

To aid the development of MA dissertation.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To introduce students to the debates about epistemology, methodology and methods in social sciences.

(LO2) To familiarise students with the practical issues and dilemmas connected to research generally and particularly with most commonly used methods.

(LO3) To teach students how to choose appropriate methods for particular research projects and to work out suitable research plans.

(LO4) To teach students analytical skills, IT skills, communication and interactive skills, time management and organizational skills.

(LO5) To aid the development of MA dissertation.

(S1) Research skills: all information skills.

(S2) Information skills: evaluation.

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving: evaluation.

(S4) Communication (written): influencing skills - argumentation.

(S5) Communication (oral).

Europe and the World (POLI501)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will gain a foundational knowledge of the evolution of the EC / EU as an international actor;

Students will analyse the problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor in the current context;

Students will develop the ability to analyse the consequences that emerge for third-states from the EU’s actions and policies;

Students will understand and evaluate the EU’s strengths and weaknesses in the international arena;

Students will explore the EU’s relations with its regional and global partners, particularly the US, Russia and the major countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Foundational knowledge of the evolution of the EC / EU as an international actor.

(LO2) A critical understanding of the problems and challenges that face the EU as an international actor in the current context.

(LO3) A critical understanding of the consequences that emerge for third-states from the EU’s actions and policies.

(LO4) Ability to assess the EU’s strengths and weaknesses in the international arena.

(LO5) A critical understanding of the EU’s relations with its regional and global partners.

(S1) Enhanced research skills.

(S2) Communication skills (written) and argumentation.

(S3) Communication skills (oral) and debating.

(S4) Critical thinking and evaluation.

Dissertation (POLI504)
LevelM
Credit level60
SemesterWhole Session
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The aim is to utilize and showcase the knowledge and skills that have been developed during their Master’s degree. Students are not required to produce new primary data, but they are encouraged to demonstrate an element of originality, either through their methods, or analysis or the application of theory. Essential is that the work is rigorously researched and coherent, and is located within the wider context of political studies, international relations, history or European studies.
While dissertation is an independent piece of work, it must be supervised.by a member of academic staff within the School of Histories, languages and Cultures.
The supervisor is responsible for giving advice on reading, structure and presentation of dissertations. Students are expected to see their supervisor at least four times during the dissertation preparation and writing stages.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) To enable students to engage with a wide range of literature, research methodologies and methods to carry out a study on a topic of their choice.

(LO2) To produce a significant and robust piece of analysis in the area of discipline(s) relevant to this degree.

(LO3) To enable students to understand the research process and develop their ability to manage this process in their time effectively.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing including referencing skills.

Optional modules

The International Politics of the Middle East (POLI130)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide in-depth analysis of the international politics of the Middle East, focusing primarily on identity and security issues;

The role of external forces in shaping the development of region’s politics;

Challenging the prevailing arguments about the Middle East, its culture and compatibility with democracy;

Integrating political science and theories of international relations in Middle Eastern Studies.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Awareness of the ways in which security issues at local, national, regional and international levels interrelate with each other.

(LO2) Ability to assess the contending interpretations of reasons for conflict and instability in the Middle East region.

(LO3) A critical understanding of the prospects for regional cooperation and the building of security communities.

(LO4) Ability to compare attempts to change regimes through mass action and reform from above

(S1) Research skills - All Information skills

(S2) Information skills - Evaluation

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S4) Communication (oral and written) - Influencing skills - argumentation

(S5) Communication (oral and written) - Communicating for audience

Contemporary Anti-slavery, Forced Labour and Human Rights (POLI150)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To develop students’ familiarity with contemporary examples of human exploitation analogous with slavery;

To develop students’ analysis of current practice and assist them in drawing reasoned conclusions for future action ;

To contribute to the process of developing anti-slavery and anti-trafficking strategies, amongst governments and NGOs, and raising awareness of issues related to their development .

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Analyse theoretical approaches to contemporary forms of ‘slavery’ and human exploitation.

(LO2) Evaluate the role of scholarly concepts, rhetorical analogies, legal definitions and national or international legislation in identifying and eliminating forms of modern ‘slavery’.

(LO3) Formulate conclusions regarding the role of current practice and the potential for future development in a specific area of voluntary, legislative or enforcement efforts to end contemporary ‘slaveries’.

(S1) Information skills - Information accessing:[Locating relevant information] [Identifying and evaluating information sources]

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S5) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

Re-inscribing Power and Identity In/from Contemporary Europe (POLI505)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide the students with the conceptual tools to understand and analyse a range of ideological tenets that contributed to shape Modern Europe – such as the Enlightenment, capitalism, nationalism, patriarchalism, or colonialism – from the perspectives opened by a series of discourses and processes confronting those tenets, and prepare the students to develop their own critical stance on the current situation of such dynamics of confrontation.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) An incisive understanding of a range of the ideologies that contributed to shape Modern Europe.

(LO2) A critical view on those ideologies based on an understanding of their inherently controversial and / or discriminatory nature.

(LO3) A substantial knowledge of the various discourses and processes that have confronted those ideologies especially since the mid-20th century till the present and an assessment of their limitations.

(LO4) An understanding of the persistence of those ideologies and of the discourses and processes confronting them and a critical stance on the possible outcomes of such confrontation.

(S1) A capacity to understand and analyse a range of ideological structures that inform the societies and cultures of contemporary Europe, and to synthesize a critical stance on them.

(S2) A capacity to listen to others’ views and factor them in into one’s own within a context of highly controversial debates.

(S3) An ability to present orally a research question arrived at by one’s own initiative and to explain the motivations and aims involved.

(S4) A capacity to critically engage with salient aspects of the societies and cultures of contemporary Europe and to shape in a written piece of research a critical view on those aspects guided by a commitment to principles of equality and fairness.

British Foreign Policy (POLI511)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To equip students with an advanced understanding of British Foreign Policy;

To understand Britain’s current place in the world and its historical contexts;

To gain an advanced understanding of Britain’s relationships with the world in the 20th and into the 21st Century;

To gain an advanced understanding of the key literature relating to British Foreign Policy and the UKs role in the world;

To evaluate Britain’s relationships with the UN, G7, and NATO;

To evaluate Britain’s relationship with the European Union as the ‘awkward partner’ and Brexit.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will demonstrate an understanding of the literature on British foreign policy

(LO2) Students will explore a complex area of British foreign policy and the UK’s relations with at least one other country

(LO3) Students will discuss how British foreign policy developed over the post-war period

(LO4) Students will understand the functions of the Foreign Office and how it engages with other countries

(LO5) Students will present a judgement of the intellectual and political significance of the literature discussed in the workshops/seminars

(S1) Students will communicate complex ideas related to foreign policy in an understandable and clear manner

(S2) Students will research advanced issues pertaining to Britain and the world in the 20th and 21st Century and express their evidence-based arguments in an academic style.

(S3) Students will make use of digital archives for their research.

(S4) Students will refine their debating skills in seminars and then convey their understanding in assessed work

(S5) Students will identify and interpret evidence in the development of a critical argument

Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History 1 (HIST503)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to encourage students to familiarise themselves with what happened during roughly the first half of the hundred years of the twentieth century and consider the extent to which the century can be seen as a discrete period or series of periods, and, if so, how that period (or those periods) might be characterised. It also invites students to familiarise themselves with some of the concepts that have been developed by historians and social scientists to understand it. Was it, for example, the century of the battle of ideologies of Left and Right as Hobsbawm argues, or was democracy, as Mazower suggests, altogether more fragile and rarely achieved throughout its course?

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students who take this module should develop: a good knowledge of the principal developments (political, economic and social) in roughly the first half of the twentieth century history.

(LO2) Students will be familiar with the major debates in the relevant historiography.

(LO3) Students will have the ability to work with primary sources.

(LO4) Students will gain ability to write detailed essays showing evidence of a deep understanding of the subject matter appropriate to study at the Masters level.

(S1) Improving learning performance.

(S2) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability.

(S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information.

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression.

Media and Politics: Theories and Cases B (COMM765)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to give students an appreciation of how questions of the media are placed within political studies and how questions of politics are placed within media and communication studies. It also aims to develop skills both of political and media analysis and to encourage students to understand the media-political relationship within a context of change in political culture and in media and information technology. The module will also equip students with the skill to assess and examine the power dynamics, contested representations, and consequences of media reporting of selected contemporary political conflicts. A further aim is for students to become able to scrutinise the underlying rationale for media representation and reporting of politics.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of key theories and debates relating to the relationship between media and politics.

(LO2) Students will be able to critically analyse the theoretical approaches to media/politics relationship.

(LO3) Students will be able to evaluate media power through a focus on selected contemporary cases and controversies.

(LO4) Students will acquire an advanced understanding of different models of the relationship between media, society and the state.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills).

(S3) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation.

Politics of the Environment (ENVS525)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims

This module is designed to critically evaluate the political responses to the growing impacts that environmental issues and the concept of sustainability are having on decision making at all levels of governance (international, national and local) and other spheres of decision making which impact on the environment. More specifically the module aims to:

Develop a critical understanding of the growing importance of environmental and sustainable development thinking in decision-making processes;

Explore different environmental attitudes, values and perspectives and examine the impact on various environmental perspectives;

Develop a critical understanding of the opportunities and limitations of environmental decision making international dimension of environmental politics and its impact on nation states;

Understand the role that environmental pressure groups have in shaping political decisions at the international, national and local levels of governance;

Critically evaluate the policy responses at national and local levels to the new emerging environmental agenda;

Explore the role and impact of other decision makers on environmental agendas.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A critical appreciation of how environmental issues are being addressed at all levels of government

(LO2) A critical understanding of different environmental values and attitudes and the way that these impact upon political philosophy and decision making

(LO3) A critical understanding of the way that various environmental interest groups impact on political and other decision-making processes

(S1) Communication skills

(S2) International awareness

(S3) Ethical awareness

Strategic Studies in Conflicts and Terrorism (POLI347)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting30:70
Aims

Examine which factors are more likely to trigger the outbreak of wars within a country and the evidence in favour and against the advanced theoretical arguments;

Analyse the strength and shortcomings of the advanced theories by looking at recent empirical contributions in the field;

Understand how and to which extent wars, terrorism and conflicts can be operationalized, measured and tested in empirical analyses;

Investigate the effect of peacekeeping operations on peace conditions and peace duration by a review of cases of success and failure of peacekeeping activities;

Examine the likely effects of terrorism on governments’ responses and the domestic and international factors leading to “suboptimal” counterterrorist policies;

Analyse the relationship between terrorism and public opinion and investigate the mechanisms advanced by selected theories on public responses and the empirical strategies used to test them.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understand the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and terrorism and how empirical research can address some of these puzzles while others are remain still open.

(LO2) Interpret the findings advanced by the empirical literature against or in line with the theoretical predictions advanced by the literature and students’ own pre-theoretical intuitions on the determinants of wars and conflicts.

(LO3) Become familiar with some of the empirical techniques used in conflict and terrorism studies.

(LO4) Reach a critical evaluation of the likely domestic and international triggers of wars, conflicts and terrorism and extrapolate recommendations for policy making.

(S1) Acquire solid knowledge of the main theoretical puzzles in the areas of conflicts and the main obstacles to conflict resolution.

(S2) Interpret the empirical findings advanced by the literature and familiarity with the main methodological tools used to estimate the determinants and effects of conflicts and terrorism.

(S3) Carry out descriptive data analysis and basic statistical exercises using statistical software packages (Stata).

(S4) Grasp the importance of research design in social science research and assess the validity of the arguments, hypotheses and findings in conflict and terrorism studies.

Conflict and Politics in Northern Ireland (POLI815)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To provide students with a well-informed and up-to-date understanding of the politics and governance of Northern Ireland;

To engage students with scholarly debates about the conflict and its aftermath in Northern Ireland;

To enable students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understanding of the causes of the Northern Ireland conflict.

(LO2) Ability to evaluate different interpretations of the Northern Ireland conflict.

(LO3) Knowledge of the theory and practice of consociational power-sharing.

(LO4) Ability to assess the extent and implications of division in contemporary Northern Ireland politics and society.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - seminar discussions.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - academic writing including referencing skills.

(S3) Time and project management - personal organisation.

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis.

(S5) Working in groups and teams - listening skills.

(S6) Information skills - information accessing: locating relevant information, identifying and evaluating information sources.

(S7) Global citizenship - relevant economic / political understanding.

Principles of International Law (LAW353)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterFirst Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module provides students with an in-depth specialist knowledge of the principles and structure of international law, with special emphasis on law-making processes;

Critical tools for an understanding of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations;

Ability to identify the law and apply it correctly to hypothetical scenarios informed by major doctrinal and policy concerns;

Ability to undertake independent research and reflect on today’s most debated theoretical and practical issue in the field;

Ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing;

Ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials against the backdrop of multiple international, regional and domestic legal and policy frameworks.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) A critical understanding and knowledge of the principles that form the basis of the law governing inter-state relations

(LO2) An ability to identify complex international legal issues and problems including those suitable for further research

(LO3) An ability to work effectively with all relevant primary and secondary international legal sources, including complex materials, and to inform and develop understanding of a given topic

(LO4) An awareness of the interaction of political and legal factors in the conduct of international relations

(LO5) An ability to apply legal knowledge to complex situations including those involving doctrinal disputes over the theory and practice of international law, and to offer own reasoned views over such legal disputes

(LO6) An ability to construct coherent legal arguments orally and in writing

(LO7) An ability to undertake independent research, and to think critically about international legal issues

(LO8) An ability to interpret and evaluate international legal materials within the wider context of international relations and domestic practices

(S1) Conduct independent research and critical analysis

(S2) Problem Solving

(S3) Verbal communication and reasoning

(S4) Effective legal reasoning

Comparative Peace Processes (POLI133)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting50:50
Aims

To develop understanding of what constitutes a peace process;

To understand the development of peace processes in selected locations;

To understand why peace processes succeed or fail.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Understanding of the concept of a peace processes

(LO2) Knowledge of the conceptual and empirical development of peace processes in certain locations.

(LO3) Understanding of why peace processes succeed or fail.

(S1) Ability to understand and evaluate competing academic perspectives.

(S2) Ability to produce coherent and comprehensive written material via exam and essay.

(S3) Ability to articulate ideas orally in seminars.

The International System (POLI135)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To equip students with the necessary empirical knowledge and analytical tools to study international relations at an advanced level;

To explore the relationship between theory, history and contemporary developments in the international sphere.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) By the end of the module, students will: Possess a comprehensive base of empirical knowledge with respect to the politics of the international system;

(LO2) Have developed understanding of the key debates in the field of international relations.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation

Quantitative Methods and World Politics (POLI510)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to core statistical concepts and considerations in quantitative social science;

To enable students to generate descriptive statistics from a dataset;

To familiarise students with current quantitative research in areas such as public opinion, comparative government, international relations and security studies;

To enable students to read and understand statistical analysis in journal articles and reports;

To give students experience using contemporary software for statistical analysis;

To enable students to conduct their own multiple regression analysis, testing one or more hypotheses about world politics.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Knowledge of core statistical concepts and considerations in quantitative social science.

(LO2) Knowledge of the functionality of contemporary statistical software and of the basics of statistical programming.

(LO3) Knowledge of current data projects in the study of world politics, as well the ability to find quantitative data about political issues.

(LO4) Knowledge of how the analysis of data contributes to debates in the study of politics and international relations and the ability to research these debates.

(LO5) Knowledge of the current quantitative evidence about key issues in world politics and the ability to evaluate this evidence.

(S1) Interpreting quantitative data.

(S2) Communicating the findings of quantitative research.

(S3) Using statistical software.

(S4) Researching a topic in the quantitative study of world politics.

(S5) Conducting independent statistical analysis of data and testing hypotheses.

Global Journalism and Politics (COMM748)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

To introduce students to ways that different social, political, and economic contexts impact on how journalism is produced and consumed.

To enable students to compare the professional practices and ideologies of journalists across different countries.

To analyse the efficacy and quality of journalism in comparative perspective.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to define and critically evaluate key theories and concepts that explain the interplay between journalism and politics.

(LO2) Students will be able to understand and critically analyse the role journalists play both in the global South and in the global North.

(LO3) Students will be able to discuss the current state of media freedom and journalistic practices around the world as well as the main contextual factors that influence those practices.

(LO4) Students will be able to critically analyse different perspectives on how global audiences' expectations and consumption habits shape, and are shaped by, the political information environment.

(S1) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S2) Communication, listening and questioning respecting others, contributing to discussions, presentations.

(S3) Research management developing a research strategy, project planning and delivery, formulating questions, selecting literature, using primary/secondary/diverse sources.

(S4) Information literacy online, finding, interpreting, evaluating, managing and sharing information.

Media and Politics: Economy and Society B (COMM763)
LevelM
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

This module aims to encourage students to develop a critical understanding of the economic underpinnings of media and, in particular, news production, and how these relate to and impact upon media texts, discourses, and public politics more generally. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical attitude towards media ownership, and processes/conventions of media production in capitalist societies. Further, they will be given opportunities to analyse the ways in which these influences manifest themselves in media texts and, by extension, in political culture and public opinion. Students will be encouraged to develop a critical and analytical understanding of various media discourses affected by neoliberal thought, populist rhetoric, and political partisanship. Students will develop a basic understanding of media effects research, in particular as regards the use of experimental designs and regression analyses.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of economic theories of news production and the relationship of media and communication with a neoliberal, capitalist system.

(LO2) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of economic media production contexts and their bearing on offline and online media discourses and, by extension, political culture and public opinion.

(LO3) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of current trends and developments in media technology, business logics, and media use, and their implications for democratic politics.

(LO4) Students will have familiarity with and understanding of approaches to studying citizens’ media use and its effects on political knowledge, attitudes, and participation.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis.

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S3) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Influencing skills – argumentation.

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills).

(S5) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity.

(S6) Global citizenship - Relevant economic/political understanding.

Flashpoints and Watersheds in Twentieth Century History 2 (HIST512)
LevelM
Credit level30
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

The module aims to encourage students to familiarise themselves with what happened during roughly the second half of the hundred years of the twentieth century and consider the extent to which the century can be seen as a discrete period or series of periods, and, if so, how that period (or those periods) might be characterised; The module invites students to familiarise themselves with some of the concepts that have been developed by historians and social scientists to understand it. Was it, for example, the century of the battle of ideologies of Left and Right as Hobsbawm argues, or was democracy, as Mazower suggests, altogether more fragile and rarely achieved throughout its course?

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students who take this module should develop: a good knowledge of the principal developments (political, economic and social) in roughly the second half of the twentieth century history.

(LO2) Students will be familiar with the major debates in the relevant historiography.

(LO3) Students will gain the ability to work with primary sources.

(LO4) Students will gain the ability to write detailed essays showing evidence of a deep understanding of the subject matter appropriate to study at the Masters level.

(S1) Improving learning performance

(S2) Team-working, respect for others reasoned views, flexibility and adaptability

(S3) Gathering, analysing and organising information

(S4) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression

International Intervention (POLI321)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Students will gain a foundational understanding of the law, theory, and practice of international intervention, international peace and security;

Students will develop the ability to analyse critically the gap between the laws and the practice of international interventions;

Students will explore the way how intervention practices have changed over time and how norms surrounding interventions have shifted;

Students will debate problems and challenges that face states intervening in third-states including issues of sovereignty, and the UN Charter articles on non-intervention and non-use of force.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Demonstrate foundational knowledge of the law, politics, and practice of international intervention.

(LO2) Relate the role and framework of international institutions such as the UN to the practice and laws surrounding international intervention.

(LO3) Identify problems and challenges that face the international community of states regarding the practice of (unregulated) intervention in third-states.

(LO4) Critically reflect on the challenges and consequences that emerge from interventions that alter the practice and understanding of state sovereignty.

(S1) Enhanced research skills.

(S2) Enhanced skills of communication, negotiation and debating.

(S3) Ability to communicate complex ideas both written and orally.

Politics and the Brain (POLI346)
Level3
Credit level15
SemesterSecond Semester
Exam:Coursework weighting0:100
Aims

Understand how biological, psychological and health factors might affect citizens’ political perceptions, attitudes and behaviour;

Learn how to make sense of and critically engage with high quality academic research;

Learn how to motivate and generate original empirical hypotheses and test them using quantitative methods;

Learn how to manage, analyse and interpret data from public opinion surveys;

Learn how to write short academic papers that generate and test empirical hypotheses and interpret data in a way that can be used to advise politicians, political parties, or any organisation concerned with psychology / health and political behaviour.

Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to navigate key interdisciplinary research in political psychology and in health and political behaviour.

(LO2) Students will be able to critically analyse how citizens perceive politics, develop attitudes, make political decisions, and how biases influence their making sense of politics.

(LO3) Students will be able to use the statistical package SPSS to prepare datasets for data analysis.

(LO4) Students will acquire knowledge of key statistical techniques and be able to apply them to analyse specific relationships between variables.

(LO5) Students will be able to apply notions of statistical inference and generalise findings based on survey data.

(S1) Problem solving skills.

(S2) Numeracy.

(S3) IT skills.

(S4) Organisational skills.

(S5) International awareness.

(S6) Teamwork.

(S7) Communication skills.

(S8) Adaptability.