Photo of Dr Kim Price

Dr Kim Price

Research Associate School of Law and Social Justice

Research

History of Public Health, Welfare and Medicine
Monograph: Medical Negligence in Victorian Britain: the Crisis of Care under the English Poor Law, c.1834-1900
Monograph: Medical Negligence in Victorian Britain: the Crisis of Care under the English Poor Law, c.1834-1900

Kim has expertise in the broad history of medicine and public health, with a particular interest in the impact of different relationships between doctors and patients in different settings (e.g. private practice, pauper workhouse infirmaries, asylums or hospitals). He has gained many years experience researching the experiential history of sickness and patients in different settings, and the interconnected professionalisation of the medical profession. This research has led to internationally-recognised expertise in the interleaving themes of social, legal and medical history, with specialist focus on the role of the medical profession, access to health, rights, negligent care, and the relationship between poverty, health and welfare in Britain and the British empire. As described below this research has led to further research and collaborations in closely related fields in medicine, law and the history of crime.

Empire, Population and Health
New Exchange and Shipping from West Dock Gate, Dundee (1836)
New Exchange and Shipping from West Dock Gate, Dundee (1836)

Kim's research at Liverpool brings together research in to the health of populations on the move in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Atlantic slave trade, transportation of prisoners, escape from famine and relief from poverty transplanted people across the British empire, deeply affecting the health and life courses of those who relocated, those who were left behind and those who were indigenous or had formed earlier settler communities. Kim's research therefore focuses on the longitudinal implications for health and life course in both immigrants and their descendants in what were often marginalised population groups.

Digital History of Health, Welfare, Crime and the Marginalised
Photograph of Mary Ann Hall (TNA PCOM4/50/16) © The National Archives, London, UK
Photograph of Mary Ann Hall (TNA PCOM4/50/16) © The National Archives, London, UK

Kim has published widely on poverty, sickness and disability. He joins Liverpool to meld those interests to his research in the history of crime and deviance, joining the Digital Panopticon team. At Liverpool, Kim will be using digital history methods to analyse convict health and imprisonment in the nineteenth century using prison, population and hospital records from the archive collections of the British Colonial Office and prison records of the Home Office.