Photo of Mr Christian Perrin

Mr Christian Perrin BA Hons, MSc

Lecturer in Criminology Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology

Biography

Personal Statement

I am currently seconded to the Singapore campus of the University of Liverpool, working as a Criminology Lecturer. Here, I teach Persistence and Desistance in Offending Behaviour, and Controlling Crime. My teaching and research takes a focus on imprisonment and I am enthusiastic about applied research and evidence based practice. My PhD explored the impact of prisoners doing personally meaningful work whilst serving time and the implications for policy and practice. Key publications include:

Perrin, C., Blagden, N., Winder, B., & Dillon, G. (2017). “It’s sort of reaffirmed to me that I’m not a monster, I’m not a terrible person”: Sex Offenders’ Movements towards Desistance via Peer-Support Roles in Prison. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research & Treatment, In Press.

Perrin, C., & Blagden, N. (2016). Movements towards desistance via peer-support roles in prison. In L. Abrams., E. Hughes., M. Inderbitzin., & R. Meek (Eds.), The Voluntary Sector in Prisons: Encouraging Personal and Institutional Change (Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology) (pp.99-128). Palgrave Macmillan.

Perrin, C., & Blagden, N. (2014). Accumulating meaning, purpose and opportunities to change ‘drip by drip’: the impact of being a listener in prison. Psychology, Crime & Law, 20(9), 902-920.

I also have forthcoming publications in other fields of Criminology, including desistance narrative, rehabilitative climate, and sexual offender treatment. In the 3 years preceding my current post, I held a Lecturer position at the Nottingham Trent University while I completed my PhD. Here, I taught on a variety of Criminology and Forensic Psychology modules. I also conducted research throughout this time across several U.K. prisons. I have now carried this work into the Singapore and broader Asian context of criminal justice, where I hope to conduct a variety of cross-cultural explorations of criminal justice. Before arriving at this point I studied Criminology at Sheffield Hallam University, and an MSc in Psychology at Nottingham Trent University. I envisage a long career in academia and I'm always looking to collaborate with researchers who possess similar interests - please do get in touch if that's you.


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