Fröhlich Lecture Series in Physics 2018/19 - Professor Carlos Frenk

Start time: 14:00 / End time: 15:00 / Date: 27 Feb 2019 / Venue: Muspratt Lecture Theatre Chadwick Building

Open to: Students in host dept/school/institute/centre / Staff in host dept/school/institute/centre / Students from same Faculty as host dept/school/institute/centre / Staff from same Faculty as host dept/school/institute/centre / Students within this Faculty / Staff within this Faculty / Any UOL students / Any UOL staff

Type: Seminar

Cost: N/A

Contact: For more information contact Professor Peter Weightman at sc35@liverpool.ac.uk

Website: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/physics/events/


About the event

“First Principles Modelling of the development of the Galaxy”

Professor Carlos Frenk

Director of the Institute for Computational Cosmology

Durham University

Refreshments will be served at 13.45.

The Fröhlich Lectures are presentations by research leaders which are intended to be accessible to a general audience at the advanced undergraduate level.

A conclusive test of the existence of cold dark matter. The ``Lambda-cold-dark-matter'' (LCDM) cosmological model is one of the great achievements in Physics of the past thirty years. Theoretical predictions formulated in the 1980s turned out to agree remarkably well with measurements, performed decades later, of the galaxy distribution and the temperature structure of the microwave background radiation. Yet, these successes do not inform us directly about the nature of the dark matter. Indeed, there are competing (and extremely controversial) claims that the dark matter might have already been discovered, either through the annihilation of cold, or the decay of warm, dark matter particles. In astrophysics the identity of the dark matter manifests itself clearly in the properties of dwarf galaxies, such as the satellites of the Milky Way. I will discuss predictions from cosmological simulations assuming cold and warm (in the form of sterile neutrinos) dark matter and show how astronomical observations can conclusively distinguish between the two.

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