Sociolinguistics PhD

Major code: TBC


About us

Department of Modern Languages and Cultures

This School brings together a number of internationally recognised centres of excellence for research and teaching. The departments themselves are steeped in history, and teaching stretches back for more than 100 years in many disciplines. There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity that generates a lively culture, with staff and students from all disciplines interacting through institutional research groups and forums.

The School comprises the following areas of study:

  • History, including Archives and Records Management
  • Irish Studies
  • Politics
  • Archaeology, Classics, Egyptology
  • Modern Languages and Cultures

Staff research interests

Please see the department's website.

Facilities

Research Groups and Centres

  • Migrations and Identities
  • Sociolinguistics
  • Postcolonialisms
  • Beyond the Text
  • Histories and Memories

For more information please see our webpage: www.liv.ac.uk/info/researchdept/lc/

Research Centres

Staff and postgraduates in modern languages and Cultures are involved in the activities of a number of cross-departmental research centres:

Research Institute of Latin American Studies (RILAS)

www.liv.ac.uk/rilas

Eighteenth-Century Worlds Research Centre

www.liv.ac.uk/18cworlds

Centre for the Study for International Slavery

www.liv.ac.uk/csis

Liverpool Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

www.liv.ac.uk/history/cms

India in the World Research Centre IWRC

www.liv.ac.uk/soclas/research/IWRC

Bart Miller

My supervisors are well-versed in my research area, and are often able to recommend materials or approaches that I wouldn’t have considered. They also read almost everything that I write to help me refine my ideas. They’re a great resource, and I recommend making the most of their assistance!

Which department/school are you in?

Modern Languages and Cultures

What is the name of the postgraduate study programme or research you are undertaking?

PhD- French

Can you summarise the work you are undertaking in your postgraduate programme/research in a few sentences?

I’m working on the way an idea travels through the genres of the literary works of Leon-Gontran Damas, a French-Guyanese writer. My research consists of investigating the relationship between an aesthetics of politics and literary representation in his work. Among the generic forms I research at are: poetry, a travel narrative and a collection folk tales.

What were your main reasons for choosing to undertake postgraduate study/research at University of Liverpool?

I chose Liverpool because of its reputation for research in my area. But I think that its doctoral programs invest a lot into making sure that research is the focus of what you do as a student.

How do the facilities in the department/university help you in your studies/research?

Our department invests a lot of energy in ensuring that we have access to research materials when needed. If you can’t find something you need at the library, the department will help you get it.

What expertise do your lecturers bring to your studies/research?

Liverpool has really become a hub for Francophone Postcolonial Studies in the last few years. There are four full-time lecturers who work directly in the area, and they all provide a wealth of perspectives and feedback for my research.

What kind of support do you get from tutors/supervisors?

My supervisors are well-versed in my research area, and are often able to recommend materials or approaches that I wouldn’t have considered. They also read almost everything that I write to help me refine my ideas. They’re a great resource, and I recommend making the most of their assistance!

How will the skills you are learning  and utilising now help you in the future?

Becoming a fully professional researcher requires a lot of different skills that can help you in many different career scenarios: project management, writing, sifting through and analysing relevant information, and applying criticism to your work to make it better. A PhD represents the demonstration of all these skills; it’s a really intensive experience, but completely justified in the skills that you gain in the end!