What's new

  • In April 2016 Andrew Popp will present a seminar on the topic of "Towards a Cultural History of Business"

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    ...at Copenhagen Business School.

  • In December 2015 Claes Belfrage and Adriana Nilsson, together with Peter North (Economic Geography), were awarded an interdisciplinary network funding

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    ... to support the workshop “Currency Internationalisation: An Interdisciplinary and Timely Dialogue”, which will take place on the 9th and 10th of February at the Management School.

  • Andrew Smith: Editing a special issue of the journal Business History on the intersection of business and environmental history

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    Andrew, together with Kirsten Greer (Bristol University), is editing a special issue that focuses on how flows of environmental knowledge over long distances have influenced the strategies and structures of firms.

  • Claes Belfrage: Special Issue in Competition and Change

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    Claes Belfrage: Special Issue in Competition and Change Claes Belfrage (with Cedric Durand at University of Paris XIII) has edited a special issue titled “The European Crisis and Imagined Recovery” in the journal Competition and Change. More info here.

  • Rory Miller: appointed to the board of Canning House

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    Rory Miller was appointed to the board of Canning House, the London-based organisation that links companies with interests in Latin America with government (primarily the FCO) and the Latin American diplomatic community, and has an extensive programme of business, educational and cultural events. More info here.

  • Andrew Smith: Keynote address at ‘Rethinking Sovereignty’ conference

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    Andrew will give the keynote address at a conference in Banff National Park in Canada in July. The conference, Rethinking Sovereignty, July 30-Aug 1, 2015 will bring together academics from the three North American nations to think about the evolution of capitalism and sovereignty and ethnic relations. More info here.

  • Claes Belfrage: Conferences on integration and inequality as well as Critical International Political Economy

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    As co-chair of the European Integration and Global Political Economy Network, Claes Belfrage has secured funding from the Council for European Studies and the Ecoles des Hautes de Sciences Sociales Paris to run an early careers workshop on the subject “Inequalities of Integration, Integration of Inequalities?” on the 7th of July, 2015. Please contact Claes for additional information.

    Claes will also co-convene, with Owen Worth, University of Limerick, the section “Critical International Political Economy in a Turbulent World”, at the European International Studies Association’s 9th Pan-European Conference, Giardini-Naxos, Sicily, in September 2015. Please contact Claes for further information.

  • Andrew Smith: Funded project on ‘Empire, Trees, and Climate in the North Atlantic’

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    Andrew will be travelling be to Bermuda for research in connection with a collaborative research project (with Dr Kirsten Greer, University of Bristol) called "Empire, Trees, and Climate in the North Atlantic: Towards Critical Dendro-Provenancing". The project is intellectually stimulating because it brings social and physical scientists together. The project is funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada under the Insight Development grant scheme. More info here.

  • Dirk Lindebaum: Special issue in Human Relations

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    Together with Prof. Peter Jordan (Griffith University, Australia), Dirk edits a special issue in Human relations on: When it can be good to feel bad and bad to feel good: Exploring asymmetries in workplace emotional outcomes. More info here.

  • Andrew Smith: Special issue Business History

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    Together with Dr Kirsten Greer (University of Bristol), Andrew edits a special issue in Business History on the intersection of business and environmental history.

  • Dirk Lindebaum and Mike Zundel: Can neurons lead? (Special issue)

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    Together with colleagues from other institutions Dirk and Mike edit a special issue in the Journal of Organizational Behavior on the question: Can Neurons lead?

  • Robin Holt and Mike Zundel: Fiction in organization studies. A review of The Wire in AMR

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    Robin and Mike investigate the the role of fiction in understanding economic life, publishing a review of the TV series The Wire.

  • Andrew Smith: Technology transfer in nineteenth century sugar plantations

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    This work on empire covers both the former British colony of Hong Kong and Canada, where Andrew has worked on the historical role of multi-nationals Click here to access the full paper.

  • Mike Zundel: Metis in Management learning

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    Along with academic and consultancy colleagues from Scotland, has investigated the role of cunning or mėtis amongst managers: Click here to access the full paper.

  • Dirk Lindebaum: Emotions, neuroscience, leadership

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  • Claes Belfrage and Harald Koepping

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    Harald and Claes examine the economic and social impact of refugees within (though typically right on the edges) of the European Union. Moreover, in a follow up to his advisory work on regional financial integration in the wake of the financial crisis in Europe and South America on behalf of the Brazilian Central Bank, Claes has established collaboration with colleagues at the University of Applied Sciences, Vienna. Continuing his work on financialisation in Sweden, he has also established a working group with the Stockholm School of Economics critically examining the extension of the influence of financial markets in the Swedish economy.

  • Andrew Popp: Port city lives and cotton trading in Liverpool

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  • Andrew Smith: Globalization and Canadian Business History

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  • Rory Miller: Financing British Manufacturing Multinationals in Latin America

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  • Dirk Lindebaum and Mike Zundel: Times Higher Education comment

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    click here for full text

    Dirk Lindebaum also features in a recent Financial Times contribution on 'Leadership that will mess with your head'

    click here for full text

  • Robin Holt and Andrew Popp: Emotion, succession, and the family firm: Josiah Wedgwood & Sons

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  • Andrew Popp and Robin Holt: The presence of entrepreneurial opportunity

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    click here to access the full paper

  • Dirk Lindebaum and Mike Zundel: The role of Organizational Neuroscience in Leadership Studies

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    Research at the University of Liverpool questions the extent to which studies of the human brain are able to offer insights into what constitutes ‘good leadership’.Organisational neuroscience is an emerging area of study that explores the implications of brain science for workplace behaviour. Increasingly, organisational neuroscientists claim that studying the anatomy and physiology of the brain can reveal new insights into what makes a successful and effective leader.

    Reductive

    Although this is a popular topic in leading management journals, Dr Dirk Lindebaum and Dr Mike Zundel, from the University of Liverpool’s Management School, reject the idea that leadership – a phenomenon that is socially complex, relational, and recursive – can be readily reduced to neural activity. Their argument draws on the fundamental challenges associated with such reductions. In consequence, they argue that it is too simplistic to assume that through neuroscience we can identify ‘good’ leaders and rectify ‘bad’ leaders. They caution that much more care is needed when trying to understand the complexities of real organisational life. In related publications, Dr Lindebaum contends that the use of neuroscience in leadership selection and development also raises ethical concerns, especially when so-called ‘uninspirational’ leaders are diagnosed with ‘brain profile deficiencies’, which then require remedy in order to make them more inspirational.

    Dehumanise

    He added: “I do not suggest that neuroscience doesn’t have a place in the study of organizations or leadership, but detailed depictions of brain processes dehumanise what are essentially social processes.

    "Neglecting this difference makes us prone to the very real possibility of endangering the well-being and integrity of human beings when we subject them to neuroscientific modifications in the pursuit of organizational ends.”

    The research is published in Human Relations and is the subject of an exchange two exchanges in theJournal of Management Inquiry, in November last year and March.

    Click here to access the full paper

  • Claes Belfrage: Keynote speech at seminar hosted by the Brazilian central bank

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    “Challenges for strengthening Mercosul financial integration process – lessons from the European experience”

    On the 24.10.2012 Dr. Claes Belfrage gave a keynote speech on the topic of “Challenges for strengthening Mercosul financial integration process – lessons from the European experience” at an International Seminar hosted by the Brazilian Central Bank in Brasilia, Brazil. The seminar was organised so as to provide a platform of ideas for reconsidering Mercosul financial market integration in the light of the struggles experienced as of late in Europe.

    European integration is a process that divides opinion, not least in light of the current crisis and policy regime of austerity measures. Despite its critics, however, integration has rendered war within the previously so war-struck continent decreasingly plausible. While the timing is controversial, the European Union has in recognition of this success been selected for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. Indeed, it has achieved a remarkable degree of integration in a short period of time despite the continued prevalence of national sovereignty. In fact, it is often argued that a key driver for European integration is to preserve distinctly European interests, values and models in the face of growing global pressures of competition. Beyond Europe, this has been the foremost model inspiring regional integration. This includes the much younger region of Mercosur/Mercosul comprising Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela. As a result of the current profound crisis of European integration, regional organisations, like Mercosur, have entered a moment of reflection asking a set of challenging questions. What, despite its current travails, can we learn from the European experience? How should we proceed with regional integration without the European roadmap.

    Claes Belfrage’s talk sought to assist in this reflection process by highlighting key developments in European financial market integration and positioning them within the historical evolution of European integration. 

  • In September 2015 Andrew Popp led the organisation of a highly successful, third annual Port City Lives conference.

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