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EU Settlement Scheme: Information for EU/EEA citizen children

If you were living in the UK before 1 January 2021, and you are from one of the European countries listed below (or in the leaflet), you must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by 30 June 2021.

Now that the UK has left the European Union, children and adults from other European countries who live in the UK may need to apply for permission to stay. This is called ‘pre-settled’ or ‘settled status’ depending on how long you or your parents have lived in the UK.  Once you have received permission, you can carry on living in the UK as you do now. Existing close family members (who are EU or non-EU citizens) will also be allowed to come and live with you in the UK.

How do I apply to the EU Settlement Scheme?

You need to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme online: gov.uk/eusettlementscheme. You do not have to pay anything.

You can apply yourself if you understand how to, as long as you were living in the UK before 1st January 2021. Your parents or another adult who looks after you can also apply for you or 'link' your application with theirs.

How can I get help if I need it?

If you have a question about your application or need additional support, go to: eu-settled-status-enquiries.service.gov.uk.  There is also a helpline: 0300 123 7379.

Is there a deadline?

You must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by 30 June 2021.

If you don't apply by then, you may experience problems when it comes to applying for college, university, jobs or other benefits in future. 

Download the EU Settlement Scheme leaflet (Information for EU/EEA citizen children)

You should be able to find all the information you need on this webpage, but you can also download the leaflet here as a PDF if you would prefer to print it or read offline.

Please refer back to this webpage for the frequently asked questions (FAQs) that don't feature on the leaflet.

Remember, you must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by 30 June 2021


 

Cartoon illustration of young people

 

If you were living in the UK before 1 January 2021, and you are from one of the European countries listed here, or you are a family member of someone from one of these countries, you must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by 30 June 2021.

 

Austria | Belgium | Bulgaria | Croatia | Republic of Cyprus | Czech Republic | Denmark | Estonia | Finland | France | Germany | Greece | Hunagry | Iceland | Ireland* (optional) | Italy | Latvia | Liechtenstein | Lithuania | Luxembourg | Malta | Netherlands | Norway | Poland | Portugal | Romania | Slovakia | Slovenia | Spain | Sweden | Switzerland

*Irish citizens are not required to apply to the EUSS but may do so if they wish. Their non-Irish/non-British family members can apply without the Irish citizen having done so.

What will I need to apply?

  • Identity document such as a passport or national identity card, and a digital photo of your face
  • or a biometric residence card (if you are a non-EEA citizen) - for more information, see the FAQs

Remember!

  • A separate application form has to be filled out for each child in the family

What happens when I apply?

EU Settlement Scheme steps 1 2 3 graphic

  • Step 1 – They will make sure that you are who you say you are
    You will need to use your identity document to confirm who you are. Scan the document on your phone, send your document by post or visit a location that can scan it for you: gov.uk/eu-id-scanner-locations
  • Step 2 – They will make sure you are already living in the UK
    If you do not have a national insurance number, you can upload other documents such as an official letter from your bank, school or doctor.
  • Step 3 – They will do some final checks
    If you are under 18, you do not need to tell them if you have been in jail or committed a crime but they will check if any children over the age of 10 have a criminal record. Only serious or repeated crimes will affect your application.

 

What happens after I have applied?

CONFIRMATION:

You or your parent (if they have applied for you) will receive an email telling you if you have been granted pre-settled or settled status or not.

DIGITAL STATUS:

If you are an EU or EEA citizen child, you will not receive an immigration document through the post (unless you are a non-EEA family member of an EU citizen). Instead, your immigration status will be accessed and demonstrated digitally: a record will be kept online.

You can get details of your status in the future by going to the gov.uk website and following the links. Make sure you keep the details of your application for the future, including the ID document, mobile number or email adress you used.

To see your status, you will need to have details of:

  • the identity document you/your parent used when you applied (the number of your passport or national ID card);
  • your date of birth;
  • access to the mobile number or email address you used when you applied as you will be sent a one-time use security code for logging in.

You can update these details online if they change, but make sure your parents share these details with you now if they made the application for you.

If you have been granted pre-settled status, you will need to APPLY FOR SETTLED STATUS when you have been resident in the UK for at least 5 years.

Complaints: If you feel you have been discriminated against as a result of your new digital status, please report this to EU-CITIZENS-RIGHTS@eeas.europa.eu

 

Further information and answers to some frequently asked questions can be found in the drop-down below:

FAQs

1. If I am a child, do I have to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme?

1. If I am a child, do I have to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme? 

> Because the UK is no longer part of the EU, everyone, regardless of age, from an EU/EEA country or from Switzerland (see the list of countries above or on the leaflet) who is eligible, must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to continue living in the UK after 30 June 2021.

> The deadline for applying, if you were living in the UK before 1 January 2021, is 30 June 2021.

> If you were not living in the UK before 1 January 2021, you may be able to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme in the future if you are joining a close EU, EEA and Swiss family member who has successfully applied to the EUSS by the 30 June 2021 deadline – see FAQ 7).

> Unless you are a child who is Irish or British, you should apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to continue living in the UK after 30 June 2021.

> If you already have indefinite leave to enter or remain you can continue to live in the UK without applying to the EU Settlement Scheme. However, if you choose to apply (and meet all the other conditions), you will get ‘indefinite leave to remain under the EU Settlement Scheme’ - also known as settled status. This means you will be able to spend up to five years in a row outside the UK without losing your settled status (instead of two years with the indefinite leave to enter or remain that you have now).

2. Can I apply to the EU Settlement Scheme as a child even if I am from a country outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland?

2. Can I apply to the EU Settlement Scheme as a child even if I am from a country outside the EU/EEA and Switzerland?

Yes, provided you are the direct descendant (including grandchild or great-grandchild) of an eligible EU/EEA or Swiss citizen or of the spouse or civil partner of an eligible EU/EEA or Swiss citizen.

You can also apply if you are the child of a qualifying British citizen (QBC) or of a relevant naturalized British citizen (RNBC). These are explained in Annex 1 of the official rules which are here.

3. Do children need to apply even if their parents have already applied for themselves?

3. Do children need to apply even if their parents have already applied for themselves?

A separate application must be completed for each child; a child will not be granted automatic status just because their parent/s have applied.

> Children who understand the process and can provide the necessary documentation can complete the process on their own behalf. There is no minimum age limit for children to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme on their own, and they do not need the consent of a parent or guardian to make an application.

> Alternatively, a parent can ‘link’ their child’s application to their own AFTER they have applied for themselves. If more than one child in the family needs to apply, a separate application needs to be completed for each child. Each application can then be ‘linked’ individually to the parent’s application. Parents can use their own email address for their child’s application if the child does not have their own, BUT PARENTS NEED TO MAKE SURE THEIR CHILDREN CAN ACCESS PROOF OF THEIR STATUS ONLINE IN THE FUTURE (SEE FAQ 16).

> To ‘link’ applications, parents should select the option ‘using parent’s residence’ and then enter their own application number. Application numbers are a 16-digit code which can be found on the parent’s own Home Office certificate of application, which is contained in the confirmation email or decision letter.

> If a parent’s application is being linked to their child’s, the parent must provide evidence of their relationship to the child, for example by providing the child’s full birth certificate (see FAQ 7).

> The parent must also provide a birth certificate even if the child’s application is not linked but the child is a non-EU/EEA citizen who cannot apply in their own right.

> If a child is applying because they are the child of the spouse or civil partner of an EU/EEA citizen, they must provide evidence of the marriage or civil partnership, as well as the child’s own full birth certificate.

> If a child is applying based on their residence before 11pm UK time on 31 December 2020, they must provide evidence of that residence.

> If the parent’s own application is successful, their child whose application is linked to theirs, will get the same status. For example, if a parent gets settled status, the child will also get settled status, provided an application for the child has been completed. If the parent gets pre-settled status, so will the child.

> If the parents qualify for pre-settled status because they have not yet had 5 years of continuous residence in the UK but the child has lived in the UK for at least 5 years, the child can apply in their own right for settled status. In this case the child should not select ‘using parents’ residence’ as they will be applying on the basis of how long the child has lived in the UK. If the child is applying on their own, they will need to provide proof of having lived in the UK for at least 5 years continuously (see FAQ 8)

4. What if my EU/EEA parent, step-parent or grandparent in the UK has died?

4. What if my EU/EEA parent, step-parent or grandparent in the UK has died?

> If you are an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen, you can apply for the EU Settlement Scheme if you were living in in the UK before 1 January 2021.

> If you are a non-EU/EEA/Swiss child of an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen who has died, or of their spouse or civil partner at that point, you can apply as a family member who has retained the right of residence provided that you were attending a general educational course, apprenticeship or vocational training course in the UK immediately before the EU/EEA or Swiss citizen died, and you continue to do so.

> The child’s primary carer may also have a right to remain to look after them in the UK, even if they are not an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen but they were the husband/wife/civil partner of the family member who died.

5. What if my parents in the UK have separated or divorced and I am no longer living with my EU/EEA parent. Can I stay in the UK and apply for EU Settled Status?

5. What if my parents in the UK have separated or divorced and I am no longer living with my EU/EEA/Swiss parent. Can I stay in the UK and apply for EU Settled Status?

If you are an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen, you can apply for the EU Settlement Scheme if you were living in the UK before 1 January 2021.

If you are a non-EU/EEA/Swiss child, you can apply as a family member who has retained the right of residence if one of the following applies:

> You were living in the UK at the date of your parents’ divorce or civil partnership dissolution; and before the divorce/dissolution proceedings started, the marriage or civil partnership had lasted for at least two years; and your parents had been resident in the UK for a continuous qualifying period of at least one year during their marriage/civil partnership; OR

> You were living in the UK at the date of your parents’ divorce or civil partnership dissolution and you need to continue living in the UK because of particularly difficult circumstances; OR

> Your EU/EEA/Swiss parent has stopped living in the UK, and you were attending a general educational course, apprenticeship or vocational training course in the UK immediately before they stopped living in the UK, and you continue to do so.

6. What if I am a child and want to go and live with my family in the UK after 31st December 2020?

6. What if I am a child and want to go and live with my family in the UK after 31st December 2020? 

Children who were not living in the UK before 1st January 2021 can move to the UK to join family members (provided they were also living in the UK before 1st January 2021) if they meet the following conditions:

> You meet the definition of ‘child’ under Appendix EU: If you want to join as the ‘child’ of a family member, this means:

- You are under the age of 21 and are the child/grandchild/great-grandchild of an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen (or of their husband/wife/civil partner) living in the UK; OR

- If you are over the age of 21 and are the child/ grandchild/greatgrandchild of an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen (or of their husband/wife/civil partner) living in the UK, you have to show that you are DEPENDENT on them in the UK. For example, you have to show that you cannot cope financially or that you need support because of a health condition.

Note that the definition of ‘child’ is broad and includes adopted children, children in foster care, children born as a result of surrogacy etc. For full details see pp.84-87 of the EUSS Guidance.

> The family member (parent/grandparent/great-grandparent) who you want to join in the UK must:

- have been living in the UK before 1 January 2021; and

- be an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen or their husband/wife/civil partner) who would be eligible for settled or pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme if they applied, or, from 1 July 2021, has been granted settled or pre-settled status under the scheme

> In addition, your relationship must have existed before 1 January 2021 (except for those who are born or adopted after 31 December 2020), and continues to exist at the time you want to come to the UK. 

> You can apply for an EU Settlement Scheme Family Permit (to travel to the UK) or apply direct to the EU Settlement Scheme from overseas if you are eligible to do so. If you enter the UK with an EU Settlement Scheme Family Permit, you must apply to the EU Settlement Scheme within three months of arrival. For more information, see gov.uk/settled-status-eu-citizens-families/join-EU-EEA-Swiss-family-member 

> For children who are born or adopted in the UK after 1 April 2021, the deadline is within 3 months of the date on which they were born or adopted in the UK

7. What proof do I need if I make an application as a child?

7. What proof do I need if I make an application as a child?

You need to prove your identity (that you are who you say you are):

> If you want to make an application under the EU Settlement Scheme, or if your parent wants to link their application to your application, you will need a valid passport or national identity card. All applications also require a digital photo.

> If you are a non-EU/EEA/Swiss citizen you can also use a UK-issued biometric residence permit or biometric residence card if you have one.

You need to prove your relationship with your parent:

> If your parent is applying on your behalf by linking their application to your application, they will need to prove their relationship to you (ie. usually in the form of your birth certificate).

> If you are a non-EU/EEA/Swiss child, but your parent or their civil partner/wife/husband is an EU/EEA/Swiss citizen, you are eligible to apply if. You will need to provide proof of your relationship to them. This might be your birth certificate and, if you are relying on the fact that your parent’s wife/husband/civil partner is an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen, your parent’s marriage or civil partnership certificate.

You need to prove that you or your parents (or other eligible family members) were resident in the UK by 11pm UK time on 31 December 2020:

> If your parent is applying on your behalf by linking their application to your application, they will need to provide proof that they have been living in the UK for at least 5 years to get settled status. They do not need to provide separate proof that you have been living in the UK for that long.

> If your application is not linked to your parent’s but you are applying independently as a child for settled status, you will need to prove that you have been living in the UK for at least 5 years continuously.

> If you are applying independently for pre-settled status (because you have not lived in the UK for at least 5 years continuously), you need to prove that you were living in the UK since before 11pm UK time on 31 December 2020 even if that has only been for a short time.

> If you are applying to join a family member in the UK (such as a parent, grandparent or great-grandparent), you need to show that the family member you are joining was living in the UK by 11pm UK time on 31 December 2020 (see FAQ 7).

8. What if I do not have any of the required proof of identity, relationship and residence?

8. What if I do not have any of the required proof of identity, relationship and residence?

In some cases, you may not be able to get the required documentation (such as a valid passport or national identity card for EU/EEA or Swiss nationals; or a biometric residence permit for non-EU/EEA nationals). Those cases include, for example:

> If your passport is out of date or has been lost, destroyed or stolen and you are unable to get a replacement

> If you are too young to get the evidence and your parent is suffering from a physical or mental illness making it impossible for them to get the required evidence for you.

> If you are under local authority care and it is not possible, practical or in your best interests to try and get the required documentation.

In these cases, you may be allowed to use other forms of evidence of identity, residence and relationship with your parents. Other forms of evidence include:

> an out-of-date passport which includes your name and photograph

> an official document from your country of origin which states your name/birth date and nationality, such as a birth certificate or social security document

> an official document from the UK authorities which states your name/birth date, nationality and address such a social security document or national insurance number card.

> Evidence from the child’s doctor or school may also be accepted to prove length of residence.

 

If you have questions about what documents you can use, you should contact the EU Settlement Resolution Centre or Tel: 0300 123 7379You can also submit questions online here: https://eu-settled-status-enquiries.service.gov.uk/start 

9. I have the required documents to prove my identity, residence and relationship but how do I send them to the Home Office?

9. I have the required documents to prove my identity, residence and relationship but how do I send them to the Home Office?

You or your parent can send copies of your documents in a number of ways:

> Scan your documents: Upload your photo using the ‘EU Exit:ID Document Check’ app (using an Android phone or an iPhone 7 or above). You can only scan your documents if you have a valid EU/EEA or Swiss passport or national identity card, if it is biometric, or a UK-issued biometric residence card.

> Need help to scan your documents?: There are over 100 places offering ID document scanning but some are currently closed due to COVID-19. You can find details of your nearest scanning place on the government website:

gov.uk/government/publications/eu-settlement-scheme-id-document-scanner-locations/locations-offering-chip-checker-services 

> Send by post: If you have a non-EU/EEA or Swiss passport, national identity card or biometric residence card, or are using any other document that is not biometric, it must be sent by post. If you send by post, you must still upload your photo online when completing the application.

10. You need to have a phone number to make an application for the EU Settlement Scheme. What if I do not have a phone?

10. You need to have a phone number to make an application for the EU Settlement Scheme. What if I do not have a phone?

If you do not have a phone number at the time of your application, please contact the official helpline for advice: 0300 123 7379; or submit your question to: eu-settled-status-enquiries.service.gov.uk/start

11. If I have any criminal convictions will I have to give details in my EU Settlement Scheme application?

11. If I have any criminal convictions will I have to give details in my EU Settlement Scheme application? 

Anyone over the age of 18 must clearly state if they have any criminal convictions when they apply for the EU Settlement Scheme. Children do not have to give details of any criminal convictions when they apply, but a background check of criminal convictions will be carried out for all applicants over the age of 10. Criminal convictions may affect a child’s application if there is evidence of them being a ‘serious or persistent’ offender. It is not likely to be an issue for minor, one-off offences such as shoplifting.

If you do have a criminal conviction for something serious, or lots of criminal convictions for less serious offences, you should get legal advice before applying to the EU Settlement Scheme. There are many organisations, such as Here For Good and Coram Children’s Legal Centre, who will offer you advice free of charge. See the drop-down section on Additional Information, Advice and Support.

 

12. My family have no fixed residence in the UK as we move around a lot. What do I do when filling out the address section of the application form?

12. My family have no fixed residence in the UK as we move around a lot. What do I do when filling out the address section of the application form?

If you do not have a fixed address at the time of your application, you may need to complete a paper application form. Please contact the official helpline for advice: 0300 123 7379; or submit your question to: eu-settled-status-enquiries.service.gov.uk/start 

13. My family have no fixed residence in the UK as we move around a lot. What do I do to show my residence?

13. My family have no fixed residence in the UK as we move around a lot. What do I do to show my residence?

There are many different types of documents that you or your parents can submit to show how long you have lived in the UK without needing evidence of a fixed address. These documents include:

> Your or your parents’ bank statements, showing at least 6 months of payments received or spending in the UK

> A dated and signed letter or certificate from your school or college confirming that you have physically attended or completed a course for a specified period of time

> Any official documents from your parents’ place of work such as a pay-slip, a P60 or P45

> Water, gas or electric, landline, mobile telephone, internet or TV bills showing a UK address

> Domestic bills for home repairs, a vet’s services, insurance, and evidence of payment

> Passport stamps confirming entry at UK border

> A letter from your doctor, hospital or other form of healthcare professional confirming dates of appointment/s

> A letter from a government department, public service or a charity that shows you dealt with them on a particular date or for a particular period (for example Job Centre Plus, Social Services or Citizens Advice)

14. Do I need to provide my National Insurance number?

14. Do I need to provide my National Insurance number?

Only children over the age of 16 have a UK National Insurance number. You do not need to provide that for your application, but it can be helpful in proving how long you have lived in the UK.

15. What happens after I have applied?

15. What happens after I have applied?

After you have completed your application, you or (if your parents have applied for you) will get an email telling you whether you have been granted pre-settled or settled status.

If you are an EU/EEA or Swiss citizen the Home Office will not give you a physical document. Instead, your status is digital, meaning it will be stored online. If you are a non-EU/EEA or Swiss citizen you will also get a physical document if you do not already have a UK-issued biometric residence card. You can access a copy of your digital status through the gov.uk website at: gov.uk/view-prove-immigration-status.

MAKE SURE YOU KEEP THE DETAILS OF YOUR APPLICATION FOR THE FUTURE, INCLUDING THE ID DOCUMENT NUMBER, MOBILE NUMBER OR EMAIL ADDRESS YOU OR YOUR PARENTS USED TO APPLY.

Further details are available here: gov.uk/settled-status-eu-citizens-families/after-youve-applied 

16. What's the difference between 'settled status' and 'pre-settled status'?

16. What's the difference between 'settled status' and 'pre-settled status'?

 

SETTLED STATUS:

You will be eligible for settled status if you or your parent/s have lived in the UK for a continuous 5-year period (known as ‘continuous residence’)

Five years’ continuous residence means that for 5 years in a row you have been in the UK, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man. You must not have left the UK for more than 6 months in any 12-month period, except for a single period of up to 12 months for an important reason.

If your parents have lived in the UK for at least 5 years but you have not, you will still get settled status provided you and your parents have applied for the EU Settlement Scheme and the applications are linked (see FAQ 3).

Once you have settled status, you can carry on living in the UK permanently.

PRE-SETTLED STATUS:

If your parents do not have 5 years’ continuous residence when they apply, you will also usually get pre-settled status unless you have been living in the UK for at least five years and make a separate application. Pre-settled status means:

> You can stay in the UK for 5 years from the date you get pre-settled status.

> As soon as you have reached 5 years of continuous residence in the UK, you can apply for settled status. You must do this before your pre-settled status expires. If your parents reach 5 years of continuous residence before you, you can apply for, and get settled status at the same time as them if you are still a child, even if you have not yet lived in the UK for 5 years continuously.

17. If I have settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme, can my family members come and join me in the UK at a later date?

17. If I have settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme, can my family members come and join me in the UK at a later date?

Your eligible ‘close’ family members can join you in the UK at any time in the future as long as:

> You were living in the UK by before 1 January 2021

> You successfully apply to the EU Settlement Scheme before the deadline of 30 June 2021

> Your relationship with your close family member existed before 1 January 2021 (except in the case of children who are born or adopted after 31 December 2020) and continues to exist at the date that your family member wants to join you in the UK.

‘Close family members’ means a spouse or civil partner, durable partner, dependent parent (who is dependent financially or due to care or support needs) or child, including one born or adopted after 31 December 2020 and also including grandchildren and great-granchildren. Close family members may be from an EU/EEA member state or Switzerland or from anywhere else in the world.

18. Do I have to apply if I was born in the UK?

18. Do I have to apply if I was born in the UK?

Children born in the UK are not necessarily British citizens.

You should read this useful leaflet and comic carefully and contact one of the organisations listed below for further advice and support about whether you have to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme or British Citizenship. 

British Citizens Rights of Children Born to EAA or Swiss Nationals leaflet (PDF)

Belonging - British Citizenship Rights of Children in the UK born to EEA and Swiss Nationals comic (PDF)

19. I am a dual national. Do I need to apply?

19. I am a dual national. Do I need to apply?

If you have dual nationality (British and a European nationality) you do not need to apply for the EU Settlement Scheme as you already have a right to live in the UK based on your British nationality.

20. How can I tell if I am able to apply for British Citizenship?

20. How can I tell if I am able to apply for British Citizenship?

The rules around children’s right to apply for British citizenship are complicated and differ depending on where and when you were born.

The rules are explained clearly in this useful leaflet and comic but you can get more information and advice from The Project for the Registration of Children as British Citizens or from one of the other contacts listed in the Further Information and Support section at the bottom of these FAQs.

 

21. I'm estranged from my family and they have settled status. Will I get it?

21. I’m in care or a recent care leaver, estranged from my family. They have settled status. Will I get it?

The Home Office have said they will work with local authorities to ensure any child or young person under the age of 21 received settled status if one of their parents has been granted it (even if that parent no longer has legal parental responsibility).

You should speak with your local authority if this is your situation and to make them aware, or contact the EUSS Resolution Centre either by phoning: 0300 123 7379 or contacting them online (see our Further Information and Support section below).

 

22. What happens if I've been granted status but I no longer have the details?

22. What happens after I have applied and been granted status if I no longer have access to the details (phone number or email address) used in the application?

Applicants who find themselves unable to access their online status / account can contact the Settlement Resolution Centre (SRC) who will take them through steps to verify their identity and enable them to recover access.

SRC is open seven days a week and can be contacted on 0300 123 7379 with any questions about the scheme.

 

Further Information and Support

Additional information, advice and support relating to the EU Settlement Scheme

You can send questions and ask for advice about your application by going to the government website: https://eu-settled-status-enquiries.service.gov.uk/start 

There is also a helpline: 0300 123 7379

And more information about the EU Settlement Scheme below:

> gov.uk/settled-status-eu-citizens-families/what-settled-and-presettled-status-means 

> gov.uk/eusettledstatus  

> An information leaflet: What you need to know as an EU citizen living in the UK

> An information leaflet: What you need to know as a non-EU citizen living in the UK if you have, or had, a family connection to an EU citizen

> A list of organisations in your area that can also provide advice and support is available on the government website.

 

You can also contact one of the organisations below for specialist advice and support relating to children’s applications:

The AIRE Centre

The AIRE Centre
Email: info@airecentre.org 
Tel: 020 7831 4276 (Monday - Friday, 10.30am - 6pm)

Citizens Advice

> Citizens Advice website
Tel: 03444 111 444 (Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm)

Coram Children's Legal Centre

> Coram Children's Legal Centre website
One-off email advice for children, young people and families, and specialist advice for those supporting them.
Email: mcpadvice@coramclc.org.uk

East European Resource Centre

> East European Resource Centre website
Email: voice@eerc.org.uk 
Telephone Advice Line:
Polish: 07936 507 511 (Monday - Friday, 10am – 4pm)
Romanian: 07845 909 531 (Monday - Friday, 10am – 4pm)

Here for Good

> Here for Good website
Email: hereforgood@bindmans.com 
Tel: 0207 014 2155 (Monday, 9.30 - 11.30am; Wednesday, 11.30am - 1.30pm; Friday, 1.30 - 3.30pm)
Tel: 0115 964 4112 (Tuesday, 9 -11am; Thursday, 3 - 5pm)

New Europeans

> New Europeans website
Email: help@neweuropeans.net 
Whatsapp live chat +44 (0)7367 095176.
The live chat helpline is open on Tuesday and Thursday from 12pm to 2pm

Settled

> Settled website
Email: info@settled.org.uk
Tel: 07511 214 684 / 07511 214 701 (Monday - Friday, 9am - 5pm)

Multilingual Helplines

  • Bulgarian: 07511 214 684
  • French: 07511 2147 11
  • Italian: 07511 214 701
  • Polish: 07511 214 707
  • Romanian: 07511 214 698
  • Slovak: 07511 214 678
  • Spanish: 07511 214 716

If there is no answer, please leave a clear message with name and contact details and someone will get back to you.

 

Information about British Citizenship for Children