Irish Studies MPhil/PhD

Major code: IRMR


About us

Institute of Irish Studies

The Institute of Irish Studies is the only centre of its kind in Britain and is internationally renowned for its teaching and research.

We take a broad, multidisciplinary approach to the subject. Our research-active staff pursue highly innovative research and publish acclaimed books and academic articles.

Postgraduate students are valued members of our community and enjoy excellent facilities, teaching and support, as well as full involvement in our research activities.

In 2007 the Irish government recognised our contribution to Anglo-Irish and inter-Irish understanding by funding the Tony Blair chair.

Staff research interests

MARIANNE ELLIOTT, PROFESSOR EMERITA

E: irish.studies@liv.ac.uk

Professor Elliott is internationally recognized as one of Ireland’s leading historians. Her research interests include the history of political movements; religion and identity; political and cultural history and eighteenth-century Ireland and France. Her biography, Wolfe Tone: Prophet of Irish Independence, is much acclaimed and has won numerous awards. Other publications include, Partners in Revolution: The United Irishmen and France, The Catholics of Ulster and When God Took Sides: Religion and identity in Ireland. She has also played an important role in the promotion of peace efforts in Northern Ireland, most notably serving on the Opsahl Commission in 1993 and co-writing its report, A Citizen’s Inquiry. In 2000 she was awarded an OBE for services to Irish Studies and the Northern Ireland peace process.

 

DR DIANE URQUHART, DEPUTY DIRECTOR

E: urquhart@liv.ac.uk

Dr Urquhart is interested in nineteenth and twentieth-century Ireland, particularly women’s history. Her early research pioneered the comparative study of women in Ulster politics in the period 1890-1940. She is the editor of The Minutes of the Ulster Women’s Unionist Council and Executive Committee, 1911-1940 and the co-editor of three collections: Coming into the Light: The work, politics and religion of women in Ulster, 1840-1940; The Irish Women’s History Reader and Irish Women’s History. She has recently published a triple political biography of the leading Anglo-Irish political hostesses entitled The Ladies of Londonderry: women and political patronage, 1800-1959. A co-edited collection on Irish women at war in the twentieth century will be published in 2010. She is currently working on a history of Irish divorce.

 

DR FRANK SHOVLIN

E: fshovlin@liv.ac.uk

Dr Shovlin is interested in the English language literature of Ireland from the late-nineteenth century to the present, particularly the history of the Irish book, Irish short story tradition, the history of periodicals, John McGahern and James Joyce. 'he has published books on the Irish Literary Magazine and on James Joyce's 'Dubliners'. His next book, Journey Westward: Joyce, Dubliners and the Literary Revival will be published in Spring 2012.

 

DR KEVIN BEAN

E: kevinb@liv.ac.uk

Dr Bean’s research interests focus on contemporary Irish politics, in particular Irish republicanism, theories of nationalism and national identity, state counterinsurgency policy and practice, the post- Good Friday Agreement policy in Northern Ireland. His recent publication, The New Politics of Sinn Fein, examines the structural and ideological shifts of contemporary Irish Republicanism. He has also published on the Northern Ireland Peace Process and the political evolution of the Provisional Republican Movement in newspapers, magazines and journals.

 

DR MARIA POWER

E:m.c.power@liv.ac.uk

 Dr Power’s work focuses on religious history, especially community relations, the Northern Ireland peace process and the role of religion in conflict resolution. Her recently published monograph, From Ecumenism to Community Relations: Inter-Church Relations in Northern Ireland, 1980-2005, examined the means through which the Protestant and Catholic Churches in Northern Ireland promote reconciliation. She is currently working on a history of community relations policy in Northern Ireland.

 

DR LAUREN ARRINGTON

E: L.Arrington@liv.ac.uk

Dr Arrington’s research interests include theatre history, W.B. Yeats, and the cultural history of the labour movement. She has published articles in SHAW, Irish University Review, and contributed to the collection, New Voices in Irish Studies. A monograph based on her thesis, W.B. Yeats, the Abbey Theatre, Censorship and the Irish State: Adding the Half-Pence to the Pence, was published by Oxford University Press in 2010. Her current major research project looks at the lives of Count and Countess Markievicz.

 

DR CLARE DOWNHAM

E: downham@liv.ac.uk

Dr Clare Downham was a student at the University of St Andrews graduating with an MA in Medieval History. She completed her MPhil and PhD in Anglo- Saxon, Norse and Celtic at the University of Cambridge. She worked as a research scholar at the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies and taught in the Celtic and History departments at the University of Aberdeen before starting her job in Liverpool. Her interests are focused on the medieval past of Ireland and Britain and Viking Age Europe, but range more broadly from the Iron Age to eighteenth century antiquarianism. Clare has published a number of articles about the Viking Age in Ireland. A monograph based on her doctoral thesis entitled Viking Kings of Britain and Ireland: The Dynasty of Ívarr to A.D. 1014, was published in 2007. Her current research is focused on political and ecclesiastical contacts across the Irish Sea during the central Middle Ages.

EMERITA

Anna Rowan

I picked Liverpool because of the commitment of the staff at the institute. I felt like they wanted me, and wanted me to be part of the department and the research they are undertaking.

The Graduate School is an extremely important department within the University that is dedicated to helping you. They offer a wealth of valuable information and practical workshops that have allowed me to progress further with my studies and have equipped me with practical knowledge as how to plan my future research and set important targets for myself.

I have a supervisor that is keen to help me and my work in a way that best suits my learning. My supervisor’s flexibility and adaptability in her approach to helping me proceed with my work is very important and a key skill of hers. There is a significant amount of support from fellow students, friends and groups not just within the department but the University as a whole. I have found that there is a generosity and willingness to share and help me that is second to none.Postgraduate study can open your eyes to a whole new world that is there for you to experience and that will help you develop both professionally and personally but it is something that takes 100% commitment. Before you embark on this path it is essential to research your chosen area of study and make sure that it will offer you everything you expect to gain from it.

I have lived in many cities and nowhere quite compares to living in Liverpool. Liverpool has the power to make you feel alive and you are quickly drawn into the atmosphere and vibrancy of the city.

Which department/school are you in?

Institute of Irish Studies
 
What year of your postgraduate study are you currently in?

First year PhD student
 
Can you summarise the work you are undertaking in your postgraduate programme/research in a few sentences?

Culture versus Culture: The Triangulation of Religious and Small Non-profit Organisations’ Culture, the Volunteer and Subsequent Affects on Volunteer Interaction in Northern Ireland
 
What were your main reasons for choosing to undertake postgraduate study/research at University of Liverpool?

I picked Liverpool because of the commitment of the staff at the institute. I felt like they wanted me, and wanted me to part of the department and the research they are undertaking.
 
What’s the best thing about studying/researching in your department?

The tutors are incredibly knowledgeable and willing to share whatever they can with you. They are extremely helpful and always willing to answer any questions/issues you may have.

How do the facilities in the department/university help you in your studies/research

The graduate school is an extremely important department within the university that is dedicated to helping you. They offer a wealth of valuable information and practical workshops that have allowed me to progress further with my studies and have equipped me with practical knowledge as how to plan my future research and set important targets for myself.

What expertise do your lecturers bring to your studies/research?

I would not have chosen the University of Liverpool had it not been for the experience and knowledge of the staff within the department.

What kind of support do you get from tutors/supervisors?

I have a supervisor that is keen to help me and my work in a way that best suits my learning. My supervisor’s flexibility and adaptability in her approach to helping me proceed with my work is very important and a key skill of hers.

How will the skills you are learning and utilising now help you in the future?

I feel that the skills that I will learn throughout this process will allow me to become a more effective writer and a better communicator. I am also learning quickly that patience is a virtue!

What kind of support do you get from your fellow students/friends/research groups?

There is a significant amount of support from fellow students, friends and groups not just within the department but the university as a whole. I have found that there a generosity and willingness to share and help me that is second to none.

What advice would you give to anybody considering undertaking postgraduate study/research?

Postgraduate study can open your eyes to a whole new world that is there for you to experience and that will help you develop both professionally and personally, but it is something that takes 100% commitment. Before you embark on this path it is essential to research your chosen area of study and make sure that it will offer you everything you expect to gain from it.
 
Anything you would like to say about the city of Liverpool as a place to study/live

I have lived in many cities and nowhere quite compares to living in Liverpool. Liverpool has the power to make you feel alive and you are quickly drawn into the atmosphere and vibrancy of the city.