Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title Working with the Past
Code ALGY248
Coordinator Professor HC Mytum
Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology
H.Mytum@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 5 FHEQ First Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Additional Programme Information

 

Aims

This module aims to provide students with practical skills in archaeology and museology, and encourage awareness of excavations and museums as places of work, thereby supporting the development of key workplace skills as exemplified in the heritage sector.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Develop a critical understanding of archaeological excavation and recording.

(LO2) Understand the nature and limitations of archaeological evidence derived from excavation, and understand the move from description to analysis and interpretation.

(LO3) Understand the post-excavation process, providing a developed insight into the heritage sector.

(S1) Acquire basic archaeological excavation skills.

(S2) Acquire key employability skills including project management and attention to detail.

(S3) Improved teamwork and communications skills.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching method 1:
Lectures relate directly to placements, and encourage students to reflect on practice, and deliver preliminary information ahead of seminars.

Teaching method 2:
Seminars provide the opportunity for the group to be broken into subject-specific degree programmes to investigate how each week’s theme relates to their specialist field of study in discussion with seminar leader.


Syllabus

 

Since time spent on fieldwork / museum placements are counted against this module, participation is as follows:

For single and major honours Archaeology and single honours Evolutionary Anthropology students:
Compulsory: Four weeks fieldwork (120 hours);
One lecture per week (10 hours) + 20 hours self-study;
Opt-in: Six seminar sessions (six hours optional);
Total: 150 hours (+ optional six hours);
Rationale: Taking twice as much fieldwork experience as joint honours Archaeology and Egyptology students, so the seminars are optional to ensure time balances.

For joint honours Archaeology students:
Compulsory: Two weeks fieldwork (70 hours);
One lecture per week (10 hours);
Six seminar sessions (six hours) + 64 hours self-study;
Total: 150 hours.
Rationale: Taking half as much fieldwork as single honours Archaeology students, so all seminars are compulsory.

Single, major and joint honours Egyptology students:
Compulsory: Two weeks fieldwork or Museum Experience (70 hours);
One lecture and one seminar per week (20 hours) and 60 hours self-study.
Total: 150 hours
Rationale: Students will take half as much fieldwork as single honours Archaeology students, so all seminars compulsory.

Extenuating Circumstances:
Compulsory: No fieldwork; One lecture and one seminar per week.
A typical syllabus is detailed below:

Lecture: Introduction to the module (structure, details of assessment).

Lecture: An introduction to the module, including course structure and details of the assessment format;
Seminar: Bring diaries, other material from fieldwork and classes and to review what students already have to work with to create the assignments.

What did you achieve?
Lecture: Summing up progress on the summer’s excavation or museum experience versus project aims. Includes discussion of site management and conservation issues;
Seminar: Basic pr inciples in practice.

Feedback on key skills.
Lecture: How the practical excavation or museum placement used and developed key skills for all employment, whatever the sector, and how these can be articulated in CVs and at interviews. Individual meetings to receive assessment of, and feedback on, practical excavation skills or discuss assessment during museum placement;
Seminar: Review of skills and how students have examples of gaining or developing skills during the fieldwork.

The development of field practice and heritage.
Lecture: The differences between research and contract archaeology, and other roles in heritage;
Seminar: Archaeology skills and how students have examples of gaining or developing skills during the fieldwork.

Making the most of your fieldwork experience.
Lecture: This session explores how you can turn your archaeological and generic skills to best effect to enable you to follow you career objectives, in whatever field you migh t be interested. The role of the Careers support staff and facilities in the University will be explained;
Seminar: Fieldwork and personal development – visit to Careers service.

Horses for courses?
Lecture: This session focuses on comparing the excavation and recording system in which you were trained in at Norton Priory with those of another project to engage the students in key developments in practice.

Academic Advisor Week.

The post-excavation process – from data to history.
Lecture: How to write stratigraphy into history. What exactly does ‘post-ex’ involve?
Seminar: Creating sequence – context sheets, drawn records and discerning the narrative. Integration of other data for interpretation. Looking at grey literature reports.

Role of illustrations – maps, line drawings, photographs.
Lecture: Reflecting on the content of your own report, in the context of issues covered in the module, and in ligh t of the wider purpose and the use of site reports including grey literature reports;
Seminar: Critically looking at illustrations – what works for what purpose? How are they created?

Module Feedback.
Lecture and seminar hours: Module feedback.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 11

11

        22
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 128
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Assessment 2: Report.. Standard UoL penalties will apply. This work will be marked anonymously.  -2500 words    50       
Assessment 1: Diary. Standard UoL penalties will apply. This work will be marked anonymously.  -2500 words    50       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.