Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title WARFARE, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY IN THE GREEK WORLD, 510-323 B.C.
Code CLAH104
Coordinator Dr ZH Archibald
Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology
Z.Archibald@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 4 FHEQ First Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Additional Programme Information

 

Aims

The aim of this module is to acquaint students with the history and society of the ancient Greek world from 510 BC until the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC). The module also has as its aim to enable students to engage critically with scholarship dealing with the central historical questions of that period, and to foster core skills in using and evaluating primary evidence;

To enable students to learn to read and evaluate a range of advanced secondary scholarship;

To foster core skills in using and evaluating primary evidence;

To develop your skills in presenting historical analysis in written and in oral form.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) You will have a sound knowledge of the broad sweep of Greek history from 510 to 323 BC, including not only the history of events but also a range of key themes in social and cultural history

(LO2) Accustomed to using a variety of primary and secondary material to answer (and formulate) historical questions relating to political events, warfare, society and culture.

(LO3) You will have developed a variety of transferable skills including: oral discussion; listening and note-taking skills; analytical reading of set texts; identification and deployment of material relevant to a particular question; engagement with primary evidence; written exposition; effective time-management.

(S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

(S2) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

(S3) Improving own learning / performance - self-awareness / self-analysis

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - listening skills

(S5) Information skills - evaluation

(S6) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

(S7) Time and project management - personal organisation

(S8) Critical thinking and problem solving - synthesis


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Lecture:
Lectures are intended to give orientation in the subject and to introduce questions for further exploration in seminars. Lectures may be delivered online.

Seminar:
Each seminar is based around a distinct body of primary (i.e. ancient) source material, presented in an online source booklet, and a tight set of articles and chapters which will help to elucidate the sources and related historical questions.

Library Research Training:
3 sessions on the finding, evaluation and ethical use of sources provided by library staff.


Syllabus

 

The syllabus for this module follows a roughly chronological structure from Athens' liberation from tyranny to the death of Alexander. A number of introductory lectures introduce the Greek world and the sources for its study, and the module also includes study skills lectures on essay writing and exam preparation. The mix of other lectures (on the history of events and themes in social and cultural history) prepare students for the focussed discussion of texts in the related seminars.
Topics covered during the module may include:

A very short introduction to the course / thinking about Greek history;

Sources for Greek history;

‘Frogs around the pond’: The Greek Mediterranean;

The Greek polis;

Greek society;

Athens: From tyranny to democracy;

Sparta: Behind the mirage;

Men and Women;

The Persian Wars;

The Delian league and the road to empire;

Athenian democracy;

Writing Greek history;

The Peloponnesian War;

The Athenian Empire;

The struggle for hegemony: Sparta ascendant;

The struggle for hegemony: Athens and Thebes;

Spartan vulnerabilities;

Philip II and the rise of Macedon;

Alexander’s conquests;

The Greek world c.323 BC;

Alexander and Panhellenism;

Retrospect.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 22

6

      3

31
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 119
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Essay. There is a reassessment opportunity. Standard UoL penalties will apply. This is an anonymous assessment.  -1500 words    40       
Presentation write up Standard UoL penalties will apply There will be a reassessment opportunity      30       
Seminar write up Standard UoL penalties will apply There will be a reassessment opportunity This will be marked anonymously  -1500 words    30       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.