Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title ROME'S RISE TO POWER
Code CLAH247
Coordinator Professor BJ Gibson
Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology
Bjgibson@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 5 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Additional Programme Information

 

Aims

To trace the process of Rome's expansion and interaction with the Greek world from 264 BC to 146 BC;

To impart a working knowledge of the main events and processes in the politico-military domain which constituted the extension of Roman power and influence beyond Italy into the E. Mediterranean;

To show how these events related to Roman and Italian society and culture;

To show how far the primary source-material provides a satisfactory narrative and analysis and to consider writers such as Polybius in the light of their historiographical practice in the representation of Rome's rise to power in the Mediterranean world.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Successful students will be familiar with a range of ancient evidence that relates to the study of Rome's expansion in the second and third centuries BC.

(LO2) Successful students will be familiar with a range of ancient evidence that relates to the study of Rome's cultural encounter with the Greek World.

(LO3) Successful students will improve their understanding of modern scholarly debate and concepts that relate to Rome's cultural encounter with the Greek World.

(LO4) Successful students will improve their understanding of modern scholarly debate and contepts that relate to Rome's expansion in the second and third centuries BC.

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (including referencing skills)

(S3) Research skills - All information skills


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: Lectures will take the form of eleven two-hour sessions.
Attendance Recorded: Not yet decided

Teaching Method 2 - Seminar
Description: There will be four one-hour seminars through the semester.
Attendance Recorded: Not yet decided

Self-Directed Learning Description: Independent learning for this module will include reading from the bibliography of ancient evidence and modern scholarship provided, reflecting on the content of the lectures and seminars and gaining a deeper understanding of Rome's rise to political dominance in the third and fourth centuries BC.


Syllabus

 

Topics covered during the module may include:

Introduction to the 3rd Century Mediterranean world;

The ancient evidence;

The Punic Wars and ancient historiography;

Early contacts between Rome and Greece and Roman involvement in the Greek World up to 200 BC;

Polybius VI and the Roman constitution;

Livy on Roman Politics;

Rome and Italy;

Rome and the Greek World: 200 - 146 BC;

Rome and Greek culture: Philhellenism and reactions to it;

The role of individuals: Plutarch's Lives;

Roman imperialism, ancient and modern.

Seminar topics may include:
How do ancient writers describe the outbreak of wars?

Epigraphic documents;

Cato the Elder.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 22

4

        26
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 124
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Exam There is a resit opportunity. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Semester two  2 hours    50       
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Essay There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Semester two  2,500 words    50       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.