Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title POLITICS & THE ARCHITECTURE OF POWER IN 5TH CENTURY BC ATHENS
Code CLAH220
Coordinator Dr ZH Archibald
Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology
Z.Archibald@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 5 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Additional Programme Information

 

Aims

The module aims to approach fifth-century Athenian history and archaeology by investigating contemporary or near-contemporary monuments, public spaces and literary representations in Athens of cultural and political life during a period of democratic imperialism that characterised the city between the Persian Wars and the fall of the Empire in 403 BC. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the possible relationships and issues in exploring political power, wealth, and the development of culture;

To provide an appreciation of the built environment of Athenian fifth century political life: the role of finance in the state, the use of public writing;

In the final third of the module students will investigate the influence of the ancient world on the development of later political systems and the infrastructure of democracies, including the construction of contemporary democratic spaces. They will also learn about the principal forms of Greek architecture and art along with their stylistic development and socio-political context;

To improve students' critical analysis of primary sources, their writing of critical and analytical essays, and their presentation skills; and their engagement with spatial data.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will possess an improved idea of the ‘narrative’ of imperial Athens;

(LO2) Students should be familiar with key episodes and with written and visual evidence that reflects interaction between the political environment (discrete events and political ideologies) and culture.

(LO3) Students should be able to read and evaluate written and visual documents produced in Athens and be aware of the problems they may present as sources.

(LO4) Students will be able to write coherent and well - argued essays, and prepare presentations, making use of documentary evidence and modern studies.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual): Presentation skills – oral.

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual): Influencing skills – argumentation.

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving: Synthesis.

(S4) Working in groups and teams : Listening skills.

(S5) Information skills: Critical reading.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching method 1 - Lecture.
Description: The lectures will introduce key concepts, events, ideas and material evidence; bibligoraphy and sources relevant to the theme.

Teaching method 2 - Seminar
Description: Students explore set topics in detail, building on sources and modern scholarship they have read in independent study; participate in group and class discussion; and make formal presentations in 5 of the 10 seminars (weeks 3-6; 8; 10-12).

Teaching method 3 - Tutorial.
Description: Tutorial – Teaching staff are available for a tutorial before completion of assessment and to feed-forward on essay 1.

Teaching method 4 - Field Trip.
Description: Field Trip.


Syllabus

 

This module is built around a central problem, namely the degree to which the phenomenal rise of Athens in the fifth century BC as a cultural centre was related to the simultaneous political growth of the city as an imperial power. This underlying question is used to revisit the many important aspects of Athenian culture with which we are so familiar today. In this way a new and challenging context is used to re-examine key aspects of Athenian society, such as the relationship between the individual and the state; the role of festivals; the function of public monuments; state religion and state identity; the openness of the city to movement and inward migration. This module offers students a fresh and critical way of viewing the iconic period of Greek ancient history - the fifth century BC. In the final third of the module you will investigate the influence of the ancient world on the development of later political systems and the infrastructure of democracies, including the constru ction of contemporary democratic spaces. You will also learn about the principal forms of Greek architecture and art along with their stylistic development and socio-political context. It offers an integrated programme of lectures, seminars and skills sessions which will allow students to develop skills in handling primary material, critical writing skills, and presentation techniques. The module is built around a core of lectures and weekly seminars (except in tutorial week 7) and is assessed in a progressive way, by one piece of coursework, a presentation and an online examination.
Topics covered during the module may include:

Lectures Athens, democracy and ‘empire’;

The Athenian Empire: stones that speak;

Athenian democracy; Agon – festival culture;

Architectures of Assembly;

Technologies of democracy;

Cultural boundaries: citizens and foreigners in Athens;

Ideas, monuments, and political identity;

Democr acy and the Greek Revival;

Democratic spaces;

Seminars: Documents from 5C Athens;

How to give presentations;

Empire and culture (student-led seminar);

Empire and money (student-led seminar);

Civic landscapes (participatory seminar);

Forensic rhetoric – Demosthenes and Aeschines slug it out   (student-led seminar);

The ‘Old Oligarch’ (student-led seminar);

The reception of the Athenian democracy.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 10

8

.5

  2

  20.5
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 129.5
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Presentation. There is a reassessment opportunity. Standard UoL penalties will apply. This is not an anonymous assessment.  10 minutes    15       
Online test. There is a reassessment opportunity. Standard UoL penalties will apply. This is an anonymous assessment.  1 hour    45       
Essay. There is a reassessment opportunity. Standard UoL penalties will apply. This is an anonymous assessment.  -1500 words    40       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.