Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title EMPIRES AND CITIZENS: THE CLASSICAL MEDITERRANEAN AND THE NEAR EAST
Code ALGY131
Coordinator Dr PWM Freeman
Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology
P.W.M.Freeman@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 4 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Additional Programme Information

 

Aims

To introduce students to the geographical setting, chronological frameworks and general social, cultural, political and economic developments of the Mediterranean world from the sixth century A.D;

To familiarize students with key themes and forms of evidence relevant to advanced study of Mediterranean Archaeology in the Classical period;

To introduce students to the direct analysis of material culture from the Classical Mediterranean world as well as the role of museum collections in the study of Mediterranean archaeology.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will acquire an introductory knowledge of the geographical setting, chronological frameworks and general social, cultural, political and economic developments of the Mediterranean world from the sixth century B.C. to the sixth century A.D.

(LO2) Students will be gain a comparative appreciation of key similarities and differences between Classical Greece and Imperial Rome from an archaeological perspective;

(LO3) Students will be able to analyse a range of material remains and apply core methodological and theoretical perspectives to answer questions about the social and political dynamics of life in the ancient Mediterranean

(LO4) Students will compare and assess different responses to challenges posed by living in communities and interacting with other communities in the ancient Mediterranean.

(S1) Improving own learning/performance - Reflective practice

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S3) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - Evaluation

(S5) Critical thinking and problem solving - Synthesis

(S6) Research skills - All Information skills

(S7) Research skills - Awareness of /commitment to academic integrity

(S8) Global citizenship - Cultural awareness


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: Lectures will highlight key themes and provide the necessary contextual and thematic background and the general character of material change over the course of more than one thousand years of cultural evolution.
Attendance Recorded: Yes

Teaching Method 2 - Laboratory Work
Description: These will take place in and around the Garstang Museum of Archaeology, and will provide experience of handling and identifying key categories of Greek and Roman material culture. A set of work sheets provides focused exercises. Class discussion around these handling sessions also provides opportunities to develop critical thinking connecting artefacts with their social and topographic contexts.
Attendance Recorded: Yes

Teaching Method 3 - Field Work
Description: Student Field Trip to Ribchester
Attendance Recorded: No

Teaching Method 4 - Online
Description: Using VITAL resources and online Multiple Choice QuizzesAttendance Recorded: No


Syllabus

 

Topics covered during the module may include:

The Physical World: Geography, chronology and environment Sources for understanding the Mediterranean World;

Chronology, geography and environment of the Mediterranean World;

The Rural World;

Mediterranean landscapes and the ‘Mediterranean Triad’;

Town and country in the Roman World;

The Urban World;

The rise of the Polis;

Urbanisation;

Military World;

Greek hoplite warfare: Origins, organisation and execution;

The furniture of warfare;

The World and the ‘Self’: Groups and individuals in architecture and art;

Greek art in its social context;

Roman art in the imperial context;

The World of Religion;

Greek sanctuaries and religious space;

Roman religion: Recognising your gods and obtaining their favours;

The Economic World;

Metals, coinage and economy;

Scaling the ancient economy;

Th e Domestic World;

Greek household and domestic space;

The Roman household;

The Wider World;

The Mediterranean and Europe in the early Iron Age;

The Mediterranean and Europe in the Roman era;

Constructing Social Worlds: Social histories of the Person;

Integrating texts and archaeology;

Society, language, status and identity in the Mediterranean World;

The ethics of Classical Archaeology.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 22

    4

6

10

42
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 108
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Exam There is a resit opportunity. This is an anonymous assessment.  2 hours    50       
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Portfolio There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment.  -2000 words    50       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.