Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title LUXURIES AND CONSUMPTION IN GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITY
Code CLAH364
Coordinator Dr ZH Archibald
Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology
Z.Archibald@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 6 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Additional Programme Information

 

Aims

Students are introduced to the ancient understandings of "luxury", the Latin origins of which word reflect a conscious preoccupation, intensified during sporadic periods of enforced social belt-tightening, with how individuals should deploy wealth; Students will engage with the mechanisms of collective restraint ('sumptuary laws) and explore the ways in which people in Classical antiquity responded to the idea of enforced behaviour; This module aims to explore Greek and Roman material culture from two parallel perspectives: how people in antiquity perceived their resources as opportunities for enjoyment and display; and how they responded to new commodities and materials; Successive sessions will investigate modern theoretical perspectives on consumption offer a broad methodological canvas. The resources for the module will be drawn mainly from the fourth to first centuries BC, with some comparative material from outside these limits where appropriate. The focus of in dividual student research will be largely thematic, but special attention will be given to the effects of broad phase changes and their socio-cultural effects (the creation of the Hellenistic kingdoms; the emergence of the Roman Empire), on given topical areas.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to demonstrate and evaluate (in quantitative and qualitative terms) a representative range of material evidence corresponding to the themes studied and discussed in seminars. 

(LO2) Students will gain confidence and competency in the use of primary data to support original arguments.

(LO3) Students will gain confidence and competency in the conduct of primary research, using different types of evidence, literary, historical, and material.

(LO4) Students will be able to recognize and apply motivational factors for social and economic behaviour across cultures.

(LO5) Students will be able to apply different theoretical models to interpret economic behaviour.

(LO6) Students will be able to recognise the various ethical and moral frameworks governing individual and communal decision-making.

(S1) Improving own learning / performance - reflective practice

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - presentation skills – oral

(S3) Time and project management - personal organisation

(S4) Critical thinking and problem solving - critical analysis

(S5) Working in groups and teams - group action planning

(S6) Numeracy / computational skills - reason with numbers / mathematical concepts

(S7) Global citizenship - ethical awareness

(S8) Communication (oral, written and visual) - influencing skills – argumentation

(S9) Commercial awareness - relevant economic / political understanding


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Lecture:
Short series of informal lectures, introducing the methodological and theoretical framework for the topic.

Seminar:
Students will be asked to prepare material for presentation to the group on selected themes for group discussion. The preparation of presentation material enables students to gain experience of writing and analysing the themes of the seminar topics, which can then contribute to the portfolio.

Tutorial:
Tutorial session to discuss feedback.


Syllabus

 

Topics covered during the module may include:

Introduction to the topic of luxuries and consumption;

Concepts of luxury - ancient and modern; consumption: anthropological and ecologies perspectives;

Limiting consumption and display: sumptuary laws and their consequences;

The expanding world of the Hellenistic kingdoms and the Roman Empire.

Seminars may include :

The loaded table;

Homes and domesticity;

Fashion; spices and perfumes; courtly behaviour - forms of distinction;

Public amenities: Bringing luxury to the masses?


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 8

10

1

      19
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 131
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Seminar write-up There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment.  -1000 words    15       
Portfolio There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment.  -4000 words    85       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.