Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title BRITISH POLITICS II
Code POLI102
Coordinator Dr S Wilks-Heeg
Politics
Swilks@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2020-21 Level 4 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Aims

To examine the distribution of power in Britain and the operation of power within the contemporary British state, with respect to both constitutional design and social divisions of class, gender and ethnicity;

To outline the traditional conception of the British political system as the ‘Westminster Model’, place it in a comparative international context and consider the legacies of the Westminster Model’s imposition on/adoption in former British colonies and dependencies.;

To consider the extent to which the Westminster Model was challenged as a result of EU membership, constitutional reform and electoral change from the 1970s onwards and the extent to which Brexit, constitutional reforms and electoral change from 2015 onwards are leading to its reassertion;

To provide an overview of the key institutional components of the British political system (such as the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Parliament, the judiciary, the civil service, local gov ernment and devolved institutions);

To evaluate the emerging impact of Brexit on the UK political system and for the distribution of political power within it;

To evaluate the legacies of imperialism for the evolution of the contemporary British state and in shaping imaginaries of its post-Brexit future.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) You will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the key controversies associated with the distribution of power in Britain.

(LO2) You will be able to discuss the formal and informal structure and operation of power both within and beyond the contemporary British state, with respect to both constitutional design and social divisions such as gender, ethnicity and social class.

(LO3) You will be able to outline the key elements of the 'Westminster Model’, demonstrate an understanding of how it has been impacted by a variety of reforms and political changes and debate its validity as a description of the location and structuring of power in the British political system today.

(LO4) You will be able to place the Westminster Model in a comparative international context and consider the legacies of its imposition on/adoption in former British colonies and dependencies.

(LO5) You will be able to show an understanding of the role of the key institutions making up the British political system, their relative power and the relationships between them.

(LO6) You will be able to evaluate the emerging impact of Brexit on the UK political system and for the distribution of political power within it.

(LO7) You will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the legacies of imperialism for the evolution of the contemporary British state and in shaping imaginaries of its post-Brexit future.

(S1) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Academic writing (inc. referencing skills)

(S2) Information skills - Critical reading


Syllabus

 

Topics covered during the module may include:

The Westminster model of British politics: power, institutional design and democracy;

Power at the top: Prime Minster and Cabinet;

Parliament;

The Civil Service;

The Monarchy and the Judiciary;

Beyond Westminster: Devolved power;

Regionalism and local government;

The Interest Group Process;

The UK state after Brexit;

The Westminster Model beyond Britain: the legacies of imperialism.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: The lecture series provides a basic introduction and overview to each topic.
Attendance Recorded: Yes
Notes: Lectures take place weekly.

Teaching Method 2 - Seminar
Description: The seminars provide a context in which you are able to express and debate your intepretations of the recommended reading.
Attendance Recorded: No
Notes: Seminars are held fortnightly.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 12

6

        18
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 132
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
24-hour online exam. There is a resit opportunity. This is an anonymous assessment.  2 hours    50       
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Assessment 1 There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment.  -1000 words    50       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.