Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title CORRELATED ELECTRON MATERIALS
Code PHYS486
Coordinator Dr LA O'Brien
Physics
lobrien@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 7 FHEQ First Semester 7.5

Aims

Students will develop an understanding of the physical properties that emerge due to electron-electron interactions and band structure in solids, including a critical awareness of properties that cannot be explained by treating electrons individually. They will be able to conceptually understand the theoretical emergence of, and parallels between, ferromagnetism, superconductivity and exemplar contemporary strongly correlated electron effects. Using these theories, students will be able to design experimental methods to measure such phenomena.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Evaluate the impact of electron-electron interactions on the physical properties of matter

(LO2) Determine the mechanisms underpinning magnetic order and conventional superconductivity in solids, and their interrelation with key physical parameters

(LO3) Analyse experimental data from correlated electron phenomena using appropriate theoretical models

(LO4) Plan suitable experiments/methods to measure correlated electron phenomena


Syllabus

 

- The nearly free electron model and its limitations
- Interrelation between correlated electrons and the physical properties of solids Heisenberg model of magnetism and magnetic exchange (direct and indirect)
- Magnetism in metals, the Stoner criterion and the Slater-Pauling curve
- Magnetism in reduced dimensions
- Phenomenological description of superconductivity
- Theoretical models of superconductivity, London equation, Ginzburg-Landau model
- Phase transitions and mean field theory
- The macroscopic wave function and superfluidity
- Josephson effect and Josephson junctions
- Cooper pairs and introduction to BCS theory
- Contemporary correlated electron effects
- Modern characterisation techniques and numerical methods to investigate example materials


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: Lecture

Teaching Method 2 - Tutorial
Description: Tutorial


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 18

  2

      20
Timetable (if known) 60 mins X 3 totaling 18
 
           
Private Study 55
TOTAL HOURS 75

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Written exam.  90 minutes    100       
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.