Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title THE ATLANTIC WORLD SINCE 1400
Code HIST118
Coordinator Dr LR Sandy
History
L.Sandy@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 4 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Aims

The module aims to introduce students to the concept of the Atlantic world   Enhance their understanding of non-European societies and cultures Encourage them to think beyond the confines of conventional national or continental histories Get students to reflect on the significance of underlying historical processes and key concepts Develop critical and analytical skills through attention to historiography and documentary study Promote the skills of written and oral communication through essay work, presentations, and group discussion.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students who have successfully completed this module should have a critical awareness of the usefulness of the concept of the Atlantic world

(LO2) Be able to reflect on the possibilities of academic history to understand the pasts of non-European peoples

(LO3) Be conscious of the limitations of conventional national and continental histories

(LO4) Have a broad understanding of the underlying processes that both shaped the Atlantic world and acted to tie it together

(LO5) Be able to express an understanding of several key concepts including eurocentricity, Othering, slavery, and globalisation

(LO6) Have practiced the following skills: the identification and exploitation of the growing number of on-line resources; the critical interpretation of documentary evidence; the critical reading of historical texts in the context of the historiography; oral expression (either through presentations or group discussions); essay writing.

(LO7) Have an ability to develop and sustain historical arguments and utilize evidence

(LO8) Have an ability to read, analyse, and reflect critically and contextually upon contemporary texts and other primary sources

(LO9) Have an ability to read, analyse, and reflect contextually upon secondary evidence

(LO10) Have an understanding of the development of history as a discipline and an awareness of different historical methodologies

(S1) Team-working, respect for others' reasoned views, flexibility, and adaptability

(S2) Gathering, analysing, and organising information

(S3) Structure, coherence, clarity and fluency of written expression


Syllabus

 

Topics covered during the module may include:   Introduction   Why Study the Atlantic World?   People on the Move: Atlantic Migration   Cultural Encounters and ‘Othering’   Encountering the ‘Other’: Theoretical Perspectives Travellers’ Tales in the 17 th and 18 th Centuries   Africans, Native Americans, and the Growth of Empires   West Africa between the Sahara and the Atlantic world The Organisation of the Atlantic Slave Trade Growth of Empires Part 1: The Spanish and the Portuguese Growth of Empires Part 2: The British, the Dutch, and the French   Slavery and the Atlantic System   The Atlantic Economy The Impact of the Atlantic Slave Trade on African Societies Slavery and the Industrial Revolution Anglo-American Industrialisation   Empire, Revolution, and Emancipations   Britain’s 17 th Century Revolutions in their Atlantic Context Revolutionary Ideas and the Maritime World Atlantic Re volutions Part 1: The American Revolution Atlantic Revolutions Part 2: The Haitian Revolution     Imperialism, Globalisation, and Exchange   Slave Emancipations in the Americas The Suppression of the Transatlantic Slave Trade: Imperialism or Humanitarianism? The Transatlantic American Civil War The United States and Globalisation American Exceptionalism Module Review: Themes, Connections, and the End of European Empires in the Americas and the Atlantic World   Seminar Programme:   The seminar programme may include the following:     Introductions/ Studying Atlantic History   Cultural Encounters and ‘Othering’ Africans and Native Americans The Atlantic Economy   The Revolutionary Atlantic     The Atlantic World and Globalisation


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: The lectures will introduce you to the principal issues and historiographical debates in the field.
Attendance Recorded: No
Notes: The lectures will introduce you to the principal issues and historiographical debates in the field.

Teaching Method 2 - Seminar
Description: Weekly seminars will concentrate on discussion of the historical literature and relevant source materials.
Attendance Recorded: Yes
Notes: Weekly seminars will concentrate on discussion of the historical literature and relevant source materials.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 22

6

        28
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 122
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.