Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title MAGIC, SCIENCE AND LITERATURE IN THE ENGLISH ENLIGHTENMENT
Code HIST591
Coordinator Dr CG Jones
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
C.G.Jones2@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 4 FHEQ Whole Session 5

Aims

1.   To build confidence in using English in an academic context, both orally and in writing. 2. To develop skills in research, collaborative learning and producing and delivering presentations. 3.   To introduce students to the English Enlightenment from a cultural, historical, literary and scientific perspective.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to speak and write English with increased confidence and competence.

(LO2) Students will be able to research a topic and work collaboratively to produce a presentation and deliver it.

(LO3) Students will be able to demonstrate an introductory understanding of certain aspects of the English Enlightenment including the connections between science, poetry and literature.

(S1) Teamwork

(S2) Communication skills


Syllabus

 

Introduction to the English Enlightenment, with a focus on issues presented by Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818). Magic, Alchemy and Natural Philosophy (Science). A historical and philosophical examination of the Enlightenment as a time of transition. Botany, Taxonomy and Sensitive Plants. This session will consider questions of life as understood by writers including Erasmus Darwin, William Cowper and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Experimental Method, Natural Philosophy and a new conception of God. This session will ask if Isaac Newton should be remembered as an alchemist rather than the father of modern science and look at God as a divine watchmaker. The Home Scientist. This session will consider human responses to new discoveries, and the loss of old certainties, as portrayed in poetry, literature and art.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Seminar
Description: Each week students will attend 2 x 2hr sessions these will consist of short lecture style sessions interspersed with practical activities and group discussion.
Attendance Recorded: Yes
Notes: The summer school programme consists of standardised module formats where by students attend 6 x 2 hr sessions over a 3 week period.

Self-Directed Learning Description: Activities include assigned reading, optional reading of areas of particular interest, homework tasks, web research and preparation for assessment.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours   12

        12
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 38
TOTAL HOURS 50

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
15 minute group presentation Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is not an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Final session  15 minute    25       
Written Essay/Reflection Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Final session  750-850 words    75       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.