Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title EMANCIPATIONS IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD: HAITI, THE BRITISH CARIBBEAN, AND NORTH AMERICA IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE
Code HIST308
Coordinator Dr LR Sandy
History
L.Sandy@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 6 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Aims

To render explicit comparisons that are sometimes implicit in the literature. To highlight crucial similarities and differences between historical experiences of emancipation and to test general hypotheses. To juxtapose different historiographies and historical traditions, each with its own presuppositions. To encourage students to reflect upon the available source materials that range widely from runaway advertisements to Parliamentary papers.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will refine their skills as critical readers by discussing in weekly seminars sophisticated literature and reach comparative conclusions. They will enhance their ability to write research-based essays on major themes drawing on both secondary and primary materials where appropriate. Students will also have the opportunity to explore the life of an individual slave/free black rebel or conspirator in some depth--an exercise that will highlight some of the challenges involved in writing the history of slavery and emancipation. Library and electronic resource skills will be further developed as they undertake these tasks.

(LO2) Students will have the ability to develop and sustain historical arguments and utilise evidence

(LO3) Students will have an ability to read, analyse and reflect critically and contextually upon secondary evidence

(LO4) Students will have an appreciation of the complexity of reconstructing the past, including the problematic and varied nature of historical evidence

(LO5) Students will have a command of comparative perspectives, identifying and assessing similarity and difference by temporal and/or spatial comparison

(S1) Critical thinking and problem solving - Critical analysis

(S2) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills - written

(S3) Information skills - Critical reading

(S4) Communication (oral, written and visual) - Presentation skills – oral


Syllabus

 

LECTURE AND SEMINAR PROGRAMME     There are six front-loaded lectures (see schedule below) and seminars are weekly. Reading week is week 5 (optional tutorials are available in weeks 6 and 7 by appointment).     The lecture programme may include:   The World the Slaveholders Made: Planter Hegemony and Pro-Slavery Ideology                            The World the Slaves Made: Slave Culture, Community, and Resistance The American Revolution and Slavery: Testing Liberty and Loyalty The Haitian Revolution: Causes and Consequences Abolition, Anti- Slavery, and Amelioration     Civil War, Emancipation, and ‘Black Reconstruction’     The seminar programme may include: Slave Culture and Community Slavery, Freedom and the American Revolution Slavery, Freedom and the Haitian Revolution Slave Resistance and Rebellion Abolition, Capitalism, and Slavery The Civil War: ‘Slavery on Trial’ ( Class Debate ) Emancipation and ‘Black’ Reconstruction: Priorities and Contests The Aftermath of Slavery: Jim Crow and Segregation


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: There will be six `front-loaded' lectures that will introduce you to the principal issues and historiographical debates in the field.
Attendance Recorded: No
Notes: There will be six `front-loaded' lectures that will introduce you to the principal issues and historiographical debates in the field.

Teaching Method 2 - Seminar
Description: Weekly seminars will focus on comparative questions and will enable you tp ull tohether material from the three societies we are studying.
Attendance Recorded: Yes
Notes: Weekly seminars will focus on comparative questions and will enable you tp ull tohether material from the three societies we are studying.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 6

11

        17
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 133
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.