Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title GEOGRAPHIES OF BODIES AND BORDERS
Code ENVS344
Coordinator Dr B Evans
Geography and Planning
Bethan.Evans@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2019-20 Level 6 FHEQ First Semester 15

Aims

To develop students' critical understanding of the relationship between bodies, identities and everyday politics ·

To develop students' critical understanding of the ways in which power operates on bodies at a range of scales including geopolitics,national health policy, the home and the media ·

To allow students to apply critical geographical theory(particularly feminist and poststructural theory) to case studies and examplesfrom contemporary geographical research


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Have an understanding of Foucauldian and feminist theory as it relates to bodies and public health

(LO2) Have an understanding of contemporary geopolitics in relation to borders and carceral geographies

(LO3) Be able to recognise and critically assess the role of biopolitics and geopolitics in relation to a range of contemporary institutional spaces

(LO4) Have an understanding of key concepts in the field including: surveillance, biopolitics, governmentality, agency and autonomy, morality, power and resistance, citizenship and civility, geopolitics and boundary-making

(LO5) Be able to engage with debates in the above fields and apply them to empirical (academic) examples

(LO6) Have developed skills in reading and writing critically

(LO7) Be able to provide critical commentary on the importance of politics and governance in everyday life

(S1) Global perspectives demonstrate international perspectives as professionals/citizens; locate, discuss, analyse, evaluate information from international sources; consider issues from a variety of cultural perspectives, consider ethical and social responsibility issues in international settings; value diversity of language and culture

(S2) Problem solving/ critical thinking/ creativity analysing facts and situations and applying creative thinking to develop appropriate solutions.

(S3) Ethical awareness

(S4) Communication skills


Syllabus

 

Indicative subject areas include the following (they may vary slightly according to staff expertise and recent developments in the research field)

Governing bodies

Everyday politics

The practice of everyday life

Biopolitics

Surveillance

Public health

Morality

Race

Class

Gender

Public/ private divide

Resistance

The body

Reproductive rights

The right to life

Citizenship

Civil society

Migration

The home

The main theoretical approaches introduced in this module draw on feminist, feminist geopolitical, and post-structural theory. The module builds on principles introduced in ENVS275 and ENVS161, as well as theoretical foundations introduced in ENVS249.

Teaching and learning strategies will include lectures, assigned readings, workshops, small group discussions. Suggested reading and relevant social media content will be hosted on VITAL.

Assessment comprises two timed essays, sat under exam conditions in weeks 7 and 12 of the course (worth 50% each)


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: In the scheduled lectures, students will be introduced to core theories regarding bodies and borders These lectures will develop the module aims by developing students' awareness and understanding of core theories.
Attendance Recorded: Yes
Notes: Unscheduled directed student hours relate to guided readings (specified for students to do each week in preparation for the lectures), readings to follow up on case studies mentioned in the lectures, and preparation for the timed essays.
Unscheduled Directed Student Hours (time spent away from the timetabled sessions but directed by the teaching staff): 126

Teaching Method 2 - Workshops
Description: There will be a one hour workshop which will involve interactive tasks, early in each of the 2 block. There will also be a one hour workshop at the end of each of 2 the blocks centred on planning for the timed essays.
Attendance Recorded: Yes

Teaching Method 3 - In-class timed essay
Description: Each block will be assessed via an in-class open book seen question timed essay
Attendance Recorded: Yes
Notes: The assessment is a 90min timed essay, students who get extra time for exams will also get extra time for this.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 16

        4

4

126

150
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 0
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Block 1 in-class, seen question, open book timed essay There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (Whe  90 mins in class, se    50       
Block 2 in-class, seen question, open book timed essay There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (Whe  90 mins in class, se    50       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.